Villano III

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This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Díaz and the second or maternal family name is Mendoza.
Villano III
Birth name Arturo Díaz Mendoza
Born (1952-03-23) March 23, 1952 (age 65)[1]
Mexico City, Mexico[1]
Professional wrestling career
Ring name(s) Búfalo Salvaje
Mancha Roja
Pulpo Blanco
Ray Rosas
Rokambole
Villano III
Billed height 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)[1]
Billed weight 96 kg (212 lb)[1]
Trained by Felipe Ham Lee[1]
Ray Mendoza[1]
Debut January 29, 1970[1]
Retired 2015

Arturo Díaz Mendoza (born March 23, 1952) is a retired Mexican professional wrestler best known for performing under the stage name Villano III (in Spanish Villano Tercero). Díaz is a second generation wrestler, son of luchador Ray Mendoza and the father of professional wrestlers Villano III Jr. and El Hijo de Villano III himself. Five of the Díaz brothers all used the Villano name; José de Jesús (Villano I), José Alfredo (Villano II), Tomas (Villano IV) and Raymundo (Villano V). Of the five Villano brothers Arturo is considered the most successful in terms of championship and Lucha de Apuesta (bet match) wins as well as the most talented luchador in the family.[2] He retired from wrestling in 2015 due to health issues stemming from wrestling.

For years Arturo Díaz was one of the featured performers for the Universal Wrestling Association and during his career that spanned from 1970 until 2015 he worked for all major Mexican wrestling promotions such as Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre and AAA as well as a large number of notable smaller Mexican promotions like International Wrestling Revolution Group. Díaz was an enmascarado, or masked wrestler, up until 2000 where he lost to Atlantis and was forced to unmask. The match against Atlantis was later named "Match of the Year" by the Wrestling Observer Newsletter awards.

Professional wrestling career[edit]

Arturo Díaz was born into a wrestling family; his father, Ray Mendoza, was already a successful luchador and his two older brothers José de Jesús and José Alfredo has begun wrestling in early 1969 when Arturo was just 17 years old. Arturo was trained both by his father and by Felipe Ham Lee, a family friend, before making his debut on January 29, 1970, under the name "Ray Rosas" (Ray after his father and "Rosas" after the color of his wrestling attire).[2] He later wrestled as various enmascarado (masked) characters such as Pulpo Blanco (Spanish for "White Octopus") and Mancha Roja ("Red Spot" or "Red Mark").[2] At one point he used the name Búfalo Salvaje ("Savage Buffalo"), a name also used by his older brothers for a while as they wrestled as Búfalo Salvaje I and II. In late 1970 or early 1971, his older brothers began wrestling as Villano I and Villano II and soon established that as the "family" name.[3] Arturo began wrestling as Rokambole, a name later used by his younger brother Raymundo as well, and often teamed with his older brothers.[2]

Universal Wrestling Association (1973-1994)[edit]

In 1973 Arturo's father and older brothers finally deemed him experienced enough to use the Villano name, becoming Villano III (Villano Tercero).[4] In 1975 Arturo's father joined with wrestling promoter Francisco Flores and investor Benjamín Mora, Jr. to form a new wrestling promotion called Universal Wrestling Association in direct competition with the company Ray Mendoza and Flores worked for, Empresa Mexicana de Lucha Libre (EMLL). One of the reasons behind the split was that Mendoza felt EMLL were not giving his sons enough opportunities in the ring.[3] All three of the Villanos followed their father to the newly formed UWA. While his brothers worked as a tag team Arturo, as Villano III, became a singles competitor and pushed as one of the top stars, in no small part thanks to his father, but also because Villano III was the most talented of the Villanos.[3] On December 14, 1975, Villano III became the first ever UWA World Welterweight Champion by winning a tournament for the title.[5] Over the next couple of years Villano III defended the title in several main event matches, earning favorable reviews from the fans. His run with the Welterweight title lasted until May 29, 1977, when he was defeated by El Solar.[5] Following the title loss Villano III moved from the Welterweight division (with a maximum weight of 78 kg (172 lb)) to the light heavyweight division (with a maximum of 97 kg (214 lb)). On March 1, 1981, he defeated Fishman to win the UWA World Light Heavyweight Championship, a title his father had won as well.[6] Villano III lost the title back to Fishman 140 days later, ending the first of his two reigns with that championship.[6]

In the early 1980s Villano III became involved in a long, intense feud with Perro Aguayo, centering on the WWF Light Heavyweight Championship that the UWA promoted at the time. On March 20, 1983, Villano III defeated Aguayo to win the WWF Light Heavyweight Championship, beginning the first of seven reigns for Villano III, tied with Aguayo for most reigns with that title.[7] His first reign lasted 140 days before Aguayo regained the title.[7] The feud between the two also saw Villano III defeated Aguayo in a Lucha de Apuesta, hair vs. mask match, on August 21, 1983.[8] In 1985 Villano III defeated Gran Hamada to win the WWF Light Heavyweight Title for a second time.[7] Villano III's second title reign lasted 826 days, which is the longest of any WWF Light Heavyweight Champion in its history.[7] During the mid-1980s Villano III's brothers, Villano I and his two younger brothers Villano IV and Villano V who had taken the name in 1983, were involved in a heated feud with Los Brazos (El Brazo, Brazo de Oro, and Brazo de Plata); during this time Villano III and Villano IV teamed up with UWA mainstay Dos Caras to win the Mexican National Trios Championship from Los Brazos, but lost it back to them 26 days later.[9] Villano III's brothers would go on to unmask Los Brazos in a Lucha de Apuesta match in 1988.[10] Over the next few years Villano III traded the WWF Light Heavyweight Championship back and forth with Perro Aguayo, Rambo, and Sangre Chicana.[7] In 1991 Villano III began working against a young Canadian known as Pegasus Kid, sent to Mexico by New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW) to train and gain experience. Villano III and Pegasus Kid had a series of matches throughout 1991, including Pegasus Kid winning the WWF Light Heavyweight Title on March 3, 1991.[7] By late 1991. Pegasus Kid's learning excursion to Mexico came to an end, but not before Villano III defeated him in a Lucha de Apuesta match, forcing him to unmask and reveal his real name: Chris Benoit.[8] Villano III's seventh and last reign with the WWF Light Heavyweight Championship began on July 18, 1994, when he defeated El Signo. He held the title until January 1995 when the UWA closed and Villano III vacated the title with which he had been closely associated for more than ten years.[7]

AAA (1995-1998)[edit]

In 1995 the UWA was forced to close down, leaving Los Villanos without a home base for the first time in their careers. The three brothers soon signed with Antonio Peña's AAA and began working for AAA as a trios group, marking Villano III's change from being primarily a singles wrestler to working more trios matches. In March 1996 Los Villanos defeated Cien Caras, Heavy Metal, and Latin Lover to become the inaugural holders of the AAA Americas Trios Championship, a championship created by Peña specifically for Los Villanos as AAA did not have an active Trios title at the time.[11] The team held the title until November 19, 1996, when they lost to Los Oficiales (Guadia, Oficial, and Vigilante), but regained the title less than two months later.[11] Los Villanos also became the first ever Mexican National Atómicos Champions, teaming with Pierroth, Jr. to win the four-man team exclusive championship.[12] By mid-1996 Villano IV and Villano V had begun working for the US based World Championship Wrestling (WCW). In 1997 most of the wrestlers that worked for WCW split off from AAA to form Promo Azteca, which included Villano IV and V as well as their brother. By leaving AAA Los Villanos vacated both the Americas Trios title and the Mexican Atómicos title.[11][12]

World Wrestling Council (1998-1999)[edit]

During this time Villano III toured Puerto Rico several times, working for the World Wrestling Council (WWC) in Puerto Rico. He held the WWC Puerto Rican Championship twice.[13]

Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre[edit]

In late 1998 or early 1999 Villano III began working for Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre (CMLL). On December 25, 1999, Villano III and Super Astro teamed up to wrestle against Lizmark and Fishman in a Relevos Suicidas. When Villano III and Super Astro lost they were forced to wrestle against each other in a Lucha de Apuesta match. In the end Villano III won yet another Apuesta match, forcing Super Astro to unmask.[14]

Unmasked[edit]

on November 22, 1999, Villano III defeated Atlantis to win the CMLL World Light Heavyweight Championship. The title change was just one of the highlights of a long running feud between Atlantis and Villano III, a feud that also included III's younger brothers Villano IV and Villano V who no longer worked for WCW. On March 17, 2000, at CMLL's 2000 Juicio Final event, Atlantis won his biggest Apuesta victory to date as he defeated and then unmasked Villano III in a match that was voted the Wrestling Observer 2000 Match of the Year.[15] In 2010 SuperLuchas Magazine suggested that this may have been the lucha libre match of the decade for the 2000s (decade) A few months later Villano III, IV and V defeated Escuadron de la Muerte ("The Death Squadron"; Cyborg Cop, Maniac Cop, and Vader Cop) to win the IWRG Intercontinental Trios Championship. Los Villano still worked for CMLL but they had a talent sharing arrangement with International Wrestling Revolution Group (IWRG) that allowed them to work for IWRG as well.[16] Villano III's CMLL World Light Heavyweight Championship reign came to an end on September 7, 2001, when he was pinned by Shocker. Following the title loss Los Villanos worked more infrequently for CMLL, taking bookings both in IWRG and on the Mexican independent circuit as well. On March 21, 2002, Villano III's last title reign ended when Los Villanos were stripped of the IWRG Trios title as Villano V was injured and unable to defend the title.[17] In the latter half of the 2000s Villano IV and V have worked for CMLL while Villano III's CMLL appearances have been more sporadic, wrestling on the independent circuit. Villano III frequently appears in Lucha de Apuesta matches, having won the hair of Scorpio, Jr. (twice), Brazo de Oro, Brazo de Platino and El Cobarde II in recent years, only losing one Apuesta match, losing his hair against L.A. Park in a multi-man match on May 5, 2007.[8] In May, 2015 Mendoza announced that he would retire from active competition due to several knee injuries and diminishing eyesight leaving him unable to compete like he used to in the past.[18]

Personal life[edit]

Arturo Mendoza is the third son and third child overall of José Díaz Velazquez and Lupita Mendoza. His brothers, like himself all became wrestlers: José de Jesús (Villano I), José Alfredo (Villano II), Arturo, Raymundo Mendoza, Jr. (Villano V), and Thomas (Villano IV).[3] Lupita Mendoza died in 1986, his second oldest brother José Alfredo died in 1989, his oldest brother José de Jesús died in 2002, and his father José Diaz died on April 16, 2003.[3] Díaz was adamant that his sons get a good education instead of becoming wrestlers, wishing that they become lawyers or doctors as he wanted to spare them the physical suffering he experienced himself. Once he realized that his two oldest sons had begun wrestling under masks he agreed to train them and help their wrestling careers. He was also instrumental in training the rest of his son, although he insisted they both get college degrees before they were allowed to begin wrestling. Since his youngest son Thomas finished his education first he became known as "Villano IV" while Raymundo, the second youngest son, became Villano V".[3] Arturo's sons wrestle under the names Villano III Jr. and El Hijo del Villano III.[18] His nephews (sons of Raymundo) are also wrestlers, known as Kortiz, Kaving and Villano V Jr.

In wrestling[edit]

Championships and accomplishments[edit]

Luchas de Apuestas record[edit]

Winner (wager) Loser (wager) Location Event Date Notes
Villano III (mask) Oso Polar (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Mr. Niebla[Note 2] (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Oso Polar II (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) César Valentino (hair) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Indio Vitela (hair) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Rubén Rubio (hair) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Toro Zúñiga (hair) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) El Cuervo (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) El Cuervo (hair) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) El Mariscal (hair) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Roy Meneses (hair) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Coloso Colosetti (hair) Live event Unknown Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Centella Nolasco (hair) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Carlos García (hair) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Orfeo Negro (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) El Fantasma de Hidalgo (mask) Live event Unknown Unknown  
Villano III (mask) La Momia del Convento (mask) Live event Unknown Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Mr. Dollar (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) El Médico I (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Bestia Roja (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) The Tempest (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) and Unknown (hair) Los Hippies (hair)
(Renato Torres and El Vikingo)
Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III and Búfalo Salvaje II (mask) Los Ángeles Infernales (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) and Unknown (mask) Las Momias de Guanajuato (mask) Unknown Live event Unknown  
Villano III (mask) Rudy Espinosa (hair) Ahuizotla, Mexico State Live event April 22, 1973  
Villano III (mask) La Cobra (mask) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event February 17, 1974  
Villano III (mask) El Jabalí (hair) Tampico, Tamaulipas Live event May 6, 1974  
Villano III (mask) Ray Acosta (hair) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event August 4, 1974  
Villano III and El Matemático (mask) Los Hermanos Corzo I and II (mask) Monterrey, Nuevo León Live event September 27, 1974  
Villano III and El Matemático (mask) Los Hermanos Corzo I and II (hair) Monterrey, Nuevo León Live event October 1974  
Villano III (mask) Rudy Valentino (hair) Tamaulipas Live event December 12, 1974  
Villano III (mask) Zebra Kid (mask) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event 1975  
Villano III (mask) El Infernal II (mask) Unknown Live event February 4, 1975  
Villano III (mask) Orqídea Negra (mask) Unknown Live event February 25, 1975  
Villano III (mask) La Sombra (mask) Unknown Live event April 6, 1975  
Villano III (mask) El Desalmado (mask) Unknown Live event July 13, 1975  
Villano III (mask) Lobo Rubio (hair) Mexico City, Mexico Live event July 26, 1975  
Villano III (mask) Máscara Negra (mask) Monterrey, Nuevo León Live event August 10, 1975  
Villano III (mask) Estrella del Sur (mask) Unknown Live event November 23, 1975  
Villano III (mask) Memo Ventura (hair) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event December 14, 1975  
Villano III (mask) Babe Face (hair) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event June 16, 1976  
Villano III (mask) and Bobby Lee (mask) Los Escorpiones I and II (mask) Mexico City, Mexico Live event August 13, 1978  
Villano III (mask) Alberto Muñoz (hair) Veracruz, Veracruz Live event April 28, 1979  
Villano III (mask) Máquina Salvaje (hair) Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico State Live event December 7, 1979  
Villano III (mask) El Signo (hair) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event August 1, 1982  
Villano III (mask) El Texano (hair) Mexico City, Mexico Live event August 15, 1982  
Villano III and Unknown (mask) El Estudiante I and El Estudiante II (mask) Mexico City, Mexico Live event January 20, 1983  
Villano III (mask) El Fantasma del Himalaya (mask) Unknown Live event July 22, 1983  
Villano III (mask) Perro Aguayo (hair) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event August 21, 1983  
Villano III (mask) Flama Roja (mask) Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua Live event May 1987  
Villano III (mask) Rambo (mask) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event September 25, 1987  
Villano III (mask) and Perro Aguayo (hair) Black Power I and Black Power II (mask) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event May 5, 1988  
Villano III (mask) Lockard (mask) Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico State Live event October 21, 1988 [24]
Villano III (mask) Pegasus Kid (mask) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event November 3, 1991  
Villano III (mask) Rambo (hair) Mexico City, Mexico Live event September 24, 1993  
Villano III (mask) El Signo (hair) Puebla, Puebla Live event July 25, 1994  
Villano III (mask) El Mastodonte (mask) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event February 9, 1997 [Note 3]
Villano III (mask) Super Astro (mask) Tijuana, Baja California Live event December 25, 1999 [Note 4][14]
Atlantis (mask) Villano III (mask) Mexico City, Mexico 2000 Juicio Final March 17, 2000 [25]
Villano III (hair) Máscara Año 2000 Mexico City, Mexico Live event August 4, 2000 [Note 5]
Villano III (hair) Rambo (hair) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event June 21, 2001  
Villano III (hair) El Signo (hair) Mexico City, Mexico Live event July 29, 2001  
Villano III (hair) Super Brazo (hair) Cuernavaca, Morelos Live event February 28, 2002  
Villano III (hair) Brazo de Oro (hair) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event August 8, 2002  
Villano III (hair) Brazo de Plata (hair) Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico State Live event September 16, 2002  
Villano III (hair) Kraken (hair) Mexico City, Mexico Live event March 15, 2003  
Villano III (hair) Pirata Morgan (hair) Reynosa, Tamaulipas Live event October 28, 2003 [Note 6]
Villano III (hair) El Cobarde II (hair) Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua Live event March 21, 2004  
Villano III (hair) Brazo de Oro (hair) Unknown Live event July 11, 2004 [Note 7]
Villano III (hair) El Signo (hair) Querétaro, Querétaro Live event August 13, 2004  
Villano III (hair) Veneno (hair) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event October 17, 2004  
Villano III (hair) El Signo (hair) Naucalpan, Mexico State Live event January 16, 2005 [Note 8]
Villano III (hair) Super Brazo (hair) Tampico, Tamaulipas Live event February 14, 2005 [Note 9]
Villano III (hair) Rambo (hair) Acapulco, Guerrero Live event June 11, 2005  
Villano III (hair) Scorpio, Jr. (hair) Xalapa Live event December 1, 2005  
Villano III (hair) Brazo de Oro (hair) Querétaro Live event January 3, 2006  
Villano III (hair) Brazo de Platino (hair) Cuautitlan Live event May 16, 2006 [Note 10]
Villano III (hair) El Cobarde II (hair) Pico Rivera, California Live event March 10, 2007 [Note 11]
L.A. Park (mask) Villano III (hair) Mexico City, Mexico Live event May 5, 2007 [Note 12]
Draw Villano III (mask)
Mano Negra (mask)
Mexico City, Mexico Live event November 25, 2007 [Note 13]
Villano III (hair) Scorpio, Jr. (hair) Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico State Live event February 26, 2009 [Note 14]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Though Villano III won the title seven times, none of the reigns are officially recognized by the World Wrestling Entertainment. No reign prior to December 1997 is officially recognized by the WWE.
  2. ^ This was the original Mr. Niebla]], not related to the current Mr. Niebla
  3. ^ Steel Cage match
  4. ^ Lost a Relevos Suicidas match against Lizmark and Fishman and were forced to wrestle each other.
  5. ^ Steel cage match that also included Perro Aguayo and Pierroth, Jr.
  6. ^ Steel Cage match.
  7. ^ Lost a Relevos Suicidas match against Shocker and Perro Aguayo, Jr. the previous week.
  8. ^ Part of a Los Villanos vs. Los Misioneros de la Muerte match, the man pinned lost his hair.
  9. ^ Four way match that also included Villano IV and Brazo de Platino
  10. ^ Part of a Los Villanos (III/IV/V) vs. Los Brazos (Oro/Plata/Platino) Cage Match where the last man in the ring had his hair shaved off.
  11. ^ Triangle match that also included Satánico.
  12. ^ Cage of Death match that also included Blue Demon, Jr., Villano IV, Villano V, Silver King, Satánico and Hijo del Solitario.
  13. ^ Exhibition match with wrestlers putting on masks they had lost in the past – and then going to a draw, with both "losing" their masks again.
  14. ^ Finals of a "Losers advance" Ruleta de la Muerte tournament.

References[edit]

General source – Lucha de Apuesta record
  • "Luchas 2000". Villano III y sus Victimas (in Spanish). Juárez, Mexico: Publicaciones citem, S.A. de C.V. pp. 24–27. Especial 30. 
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Pro Wrestling Illustrated 500 – 2000 :75. Villano III". Pro Wrestling Illustrated. Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, United States: Sports and Entertainment publications LLC. August 2000. p. 39. October 2000. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Luchas 2000". Villano III: El Ultimo Rey (in Spanish). Juárez, Mexico: Publicaciones citem, S.A. de C.V. pp. 1–35. Especial 37. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Madigan, Dan (2007). "Dorada de lucha libre: Las Leyendas, las peleas, los fósforos del resentimiento (the golden age of lucha libre: the legends, the feuds, the grudge matches): Ray Mendoza and Los Villanos". Mondo Lucha a Go-Go: the bizarre and honorable world of wild Mexican wrestling. HarperCollins Publisher. pp. 193–197. ISBN 978-0-06-085583-3. 
  4. ^ "Lucha Libre: Conoce la historia de las leyendas de cuadrilátero". Villano III (1952 o 1953) (in Spanish). Mexico. 2008. p. 63. Grandes Figuras de la Lucha Libre. 
  5. ^ a b c Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). "Mexico: Universal Wrestling Federation Welterweight Heavyweight Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 397. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  6. ^ a b c Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). "Mexico: UWA Lightweight Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 400. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2006). "Mexico: UWA WWF World Light Heavyweight Title". Wrestling Title Histories (4th ed.). Archeus Communications. p. 399. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  8. ^ a b c "Luchas 2000". Villano III y sus Victimas (in Spanish). Juárez, Mexico: Publicaciones citem, S.A. de C.V. pp. 24–27. Especial 30. 
  9. ^ a b Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). "Mexico: National Trios Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 393. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  10. ^ "Enciclopedia de las Mascaras". Brazo, Brazo de Oro, Brazo de Plata (in Spanish). Mexico. July 2007. pp. 39–41. Tomo I. 
  11. ^ a b c d Royal Duncan and Gary Will (2000). "Mexico: AAA American Trios Titles". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 399. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  12. ^ a b c Royal Duncan and Gary Will (2000). "Mexico: National Atómicos Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 402. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  13. ^ a b Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2006). "WWC Puerto Rico Heavyweight Title". Wrestling Title Histories (4th ed.). Archeus Communications. pp. 328–329. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  14. ^ a b "Enciclopedia de las Mascaras". Super Astro (in Spanish). Mexico. October 2007. p. 57. Tomo IV. 
  15. ^ "Luchas 2000". Atlantis y sus Victimas (in Spanish). Juárez, Mexico: Publicaciones citem, S.A. de C.V. pp. 32–36. Especial 30. 
  16. ^ a b "2000 Especial!". Box y Lucha Magazine (in Spanish). January 9, 2001. pp. 2–20. issue 2488. 
  17. ^ "2002: considerar detrás". Box y Lucha Magazine (in Spanish). January 19, 2003. issue 2593. 
  18. ^ a b "El Villano III anunció su retiro". MedioTiempo (in Spanish). MSN. May 21, 2015. Retrieved May 23, 2015. 
  19. ^ Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). "Mexico: CMLL EMLL Light Heavyweight Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 395. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  20. ^ Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). "Mexico: Universal Wrestling Federation Light Heavyweight Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 397. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  21. ^ Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). "Mexico: Universal Wrestling Federation Junior Light Heavyweight Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 397. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  22. ^ Meltzer, Dave (January 25, 2016). "January 25, 2016 Wrestling Observer Newsletter: 2015 Observer Awards Issue". Wrestling Observer Newsletter. Campbell, California: 42. ISSN 1083-9593. 
  23. ^ Royal Duncan and Gary Will (2000). "Mexico: WWA Trios Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. p. 401. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  24. ^ "Enciclopedia de las Mascaras". Lockard (in Spanish). Mexico. October 2007. p. 18. Tomo III. 
  25. ^ Centinela, Teddy (March 17, 2015). "En un día como hoy… 2000: Atlantis vence a Villano III en duelo de máscaras… Último Guerrero, estrella del futuro". SuperLuchas Magazine (in Spanish). Retrieved July 1, 2015.