Village Roadshow Pictures

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Village Roadshow Pictures
Company typeSubsidiary
IndustryMotion picture
Founded1989; 35 years ago (1989)
FounderGreg Coote
HeadquartersLos Angeles, California, U.S.
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Jillian Apfelbaum (EVP, Feature Film)
Tristen Tuckfield (EVP, Feature Film)
ProductsFilm Production
ParentVillage Roadshow
Websitevreg.com

Village Roadshow Pictures is an American film and television production company and subsidiary of the Australian co-producer and co-financier of major Hollywood motion pictures established in 1989. It is a division under Village Roadshow Entertainment Group (VREG),[1] which in turn is owned by an Australian media company of the same name. It has produced over 100 films since its establishment in 1989 including, as co-productions with Warner Bros., The Matrix series, the Sherlock Holmes series, the Happy Feet series, the Ocean's series, The Lego Movie and Joker. The films in the Village Roadshow library have achieved 34 number-one U.S. box office openings and received 50 Academy Award nominations, 19 Academy Awards and six Golden Globe Awards.[2][3]

Village Roadshow Pictures self-distributes its film entertainment through affiliates in several territories around the world, including Australia, New Zealand and Singapore (the latter through Golden Village).[4] J.P. Morgan Chase and Rabobank International provides some funding for Village Roadshow's film slate with Warner Bros.[1] Village Roadshow had a secondary finance slate with Sony Pictures which ended in 2016.[5]

History[edit]

Village Roadshow Pictures was formed in 1989 by company executive Greg Coote, when the company purchased the assets of De Laurentiis Entertainment Group. The company has deals with major producers such as Warner Bros., and television production company Wilshire Court Productions. The first films were the Silver Series line, in which they able to represent to duplicate De Laurentiis' aborted strategy for the films, as well as the film The Delinquents, which was overall the first ever film produced by the company.[5][6][7][8] The company made its first hit, Fortress in 1992.[6] In 1993, Village Roadshow Pictures expanded into television series production with the launch of its first television show Paradise Beach.[6][9]

In 1995, Village Roadshow Pictures was heading into their television division, headed by Greg Coote and Jeffrey Hayes.[10][11] Also that year, Village Roadshow Pictures started an international sales division called Village Roadshow Pictures International, that was led by Bobby Myers, who deal with Coote to acquire U.S. and international films for Roadshow in certain markets.[12]

In 1996, the Village Roadshow Pictures Television unit started up a joint venture with animator Yoram Gross to start a venture company that was dedicated to animation.[13] In 1997, Village Roadshow Pictures inked a deal with Intermedia to launch a joint venture company Village Intermedia Pictures.[14] The deal up broke several months later.[15] Also, Yoram Gross-Village Roadshow had signed EM.TV & Merchandising to a joint pact.[16] On 4 September 1997, the company underwent restructuring with Michael Lake joined the company as managing director.[17]

In 1997, the company had signed a first-look deal with Warner Bros. Pictures to finance their films for a five-year period. Bruce Berman, of the aborted Plan B Entertainment company was signed on as president of the studio.[18] Later that year, Village Roadshow Pictures and Intermedia decided to cut their ties and became independent again.[19]

On 2 October 1998, Village Roadshow Pictures announced that they would selling its television division in a management buyout to two Roadshow heads Greg Coote and Jeffrey Hayes, who had renamed Village Roadshow Pictures Television to Coote/Hayes Productions. Around the same time, Roadshow announced it was shutting down the international sales unit.[20] As part of its exit plan from the sales business, Roadshow sold international rights to its Western productions to Icon Entertainment International, and the Australian films to Beyond Films Limited.[21][22] Also that year, Village Roadshow sold off its 50% stake in the Yoram Gross animated studio venture to EM.TV & Merchandising, which would become Yoram Gross-EM.TV.[13]

In 2012, Warner Bros. Pictures and Village Roadshow Pictures had extended their co-financing first look deal through 2017.[23] In May 2014, VRPG established a supplementary co-financing production deal with Sony Pictures Entertainment which commenced with the release of The Equalizer and Annie.[5] A second agreement was made due to the large amount of available capital.[5]

In 2015, VREG, the holding company of Village Roadshow Pictures and Village Roadshow Television, was recapitalized with a $480 million investment that included funds from Falcon Investment Advisors and Vine Alternative Investments.[24] Falcon Investment Advisors and Vine Alternative Investments added additional capital in April 2017 to take a controlling stake in the corporation.[25] This was to fund a new strategic plan for an expanded film slate and add production of television programs and other content forms.[26]

More recently, his Phantom Four company held by David S. Goyer has struck a first look deal with Village Roadshow Pictures.[27] On 27 September 2021, Bruce Berman announced that they would step himself down as CEO of the film studio.[28] On 14 December 2021, the company had signed a pact with Fox Entertainment to distribute pictures for Tubi and partnered with Kevin Garrett to launch Black Noir Cinema.[29][30]

Filmography[edit]

Feature films[edit]

1980s[edit]

Title Distributor Release date Notes Budget Box office
The Delinquents Warner Bros. Pictures 21 December 1989 First film $9 million N/A

1990s[edit]

Title Distributor Release date Notes Budget Box office
Bloodmoon Carolco Pictures 22 March 1990 N/A $419,769
Blood Oath Skouras Pictures 26 July 1990 co-production with Sovereign Pictures, Charles Waterstreet Productions and Siege Productions $10 million $707,194
Until the End of the World Warner Bros. Pictures 25 December 1991 $23 million $752,856
Dead Sleep Vestron Video 29 January 1992 N/A
Hurricane Smith Warner Bros. Pictures 31 January 1992 $5 million $89,467
The Power of One 27 March 1992 co-production with Regency Enterprises, Le Studio Canal+ and Alcor Films $18 million $2.8 million
Turtle Beach 1 May 1992 co-production with Regency Enterprises and Le Studio Canal+ N/A $778,535
Over the Hill New Line Home Video 30 June 1992 N/A
Fortress[31] Dimension Films 3 September 1993 co-production with Davis Entertainment $12 million $48 million
Lightning Jack Savoy Pictures 11 March 1994 co-production with Lightning Ridge Productions N/A $25 million
The Phantom Paramount Pictures 7 June 1996 co-production with The Ladd Company $45 million $23.5 million
Hotel de Love LIVE Entertainment 12 September 1996 co-production with Pratt Films N/A $747,372
Bullet New Line Home Video October 1996 co-production with Clipsal Film Partnership N/A
Paradise Road Fox Searchlight Pictures 11 April 1997 co-production with YTC Pictures and Planet Pictures $19 million $4 million
Broken English Sony Pictures Classics 2 May 1997 N/A $541,377
The Winner LIVE Entertainment 25 July 1997 co-production with Clipsal Film Partnership N/A
Critical Care 31 October 1997 co-production with ASQA Film Partnership and Live Film and Mediaworks $12 million $271,000
Diana & Me Hollywood Pictures Home Video 4 December 1997 N/A $205,783
Joey Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures 26 December 1997 co-production with Pratt Films N/A
Tarzan and the Lost City Warner Bros. Pictures 24 April 1998 co-production with Clipsal Film Partnership, Dieter Geissler Productions and Alta Vista Productions $20 million $2.2 million
Disturbing Behavior Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures (North America)
Sony Pictures Releasing (International)
24 July 1998 co-production with Village-Hoyts Film Partnership and Beacon Pictures $15 million $17.5 million
Practical Magic Warner Bros. Pictures 16 October 1998 co-production with Fortis Films and Di Novi Pictures $75 million $68.3 million
Occasional Coarse Language Roadshow Film Distributors November 1998 $40,000 $909,475
Analyze This Warner Bros. Pictures 5 March 1999 co-production with NPV Entertainment, Baltimore Spring Creek Pictures, Face Productions and TriBeCa Productions $30 million $176.9 million
The Matrix 31 March 1999 co-production with Silver Pictures and Groucho II Film Partnership $63 million $467.2 million
A Walk on the Moon Miramax Films 2 April 1999 co-production with Punch Productions and Groucho Film Partnership $14 million $4.7 million
Love Lies Bleeding Warner Bros. Pictures 23 June 1999 N/A
Deep Blue Sea 28 July 1999 co-production with Riche-Ludwig Productions and Groucho II Film Partnership $60 million $164.6 million
Three Kings 1 October 1999 co-production with Village-A.M. Film Partnership, Coast Ridge Films and Atlas Entertainment $48 million $107.7 million
Three to Tango 22 October 1999 co-production with Village-Hoyts Film Partnership and Outlaw Productions $20 million $10.6 million

2000s[edit]

Title Distributor Release date Notes Budget Box office
Eye of the Beholder Destination Films 28 January 2000 co-production with Ambridge Film Partnership, Behaviour Worldwide, Hit & Run Productions and Filmline International $35 million $17.6 million
Gossip Warner Bros. Pictures 21 April 2000 co-production with NPV Entertainment and Outlaw Productions $24 million $12 million
Space Cowboys 4 August 2000 co-production with Clipsal Films, Mad Chance Productions and Malpaso Productions $60–65 million $128.9 million
Red Planet 10 November 2000 co-production with NPV Entertainment and The Canton Company $80 million $33.5 million
Miss Congeniality 22 December 2000 co-production with Fortis Films and Castle Rock Entertainment $45 million $212.7 million
Valentine 2 February 2001 co-production with NPV Entertainment and Dylan Sellers Productions $29 million $36.7 million
Saving Silverman Sony Pictures Releasing 9 February 2001 co-production with Columbia Pictures, NPV Entertainment and Original Film $22 million $26 million
Down to Earth Paramount Pictures 16 February 2001 co-production with NPV Entertainment, 3 Arts Entertainment and Alphaville $30 million $71.2 million
See Spot Run Warner Bros. Pictures 2 March 2001 co-production with Robert Simonds Productions and NPV Entertainment $16 million $43 million
Exit Wounds 16 March 2001 co-production with NPV Entertainment and Silver Pictures $33 million $80 million
Swordfish 8 June 2001 co-production with NPV Entertainment, Silver Pictures and Jonathan D. Krane Productions $102 million $147.1 million
Cats & Dogs 4 July 2001 co-production with NPV Entertainment, Mad Chance Productions, Zide/Perry Productions and Cat Fight Pictures $60 million $200.7 million
Don't Say a Word 20th Century Fox 28 September 2001 co-production with NPV Entertainment, Regency Enterprises, Further Films, and Kopelson Entertainment $50 million $100 million
Zoolander Paramount Pictures co-production with VH1 Films, NPV Entertainment, Red Hour Films and Scott Rudin Productions $28 million $60.8 million
Hearts in Atlantis Warner Bros. Pictures co-production with NPV Entertainment and Castle Rock Entertainment $31 million $30.9 million
Training Day 5 October 2001 co-production with NPV Entertainment and Outlaw Productions $45 million $104.9 million
Ocean's Eleven 7 December 2001 co-production with Jerry Weintraub Productions, NPV Entertainment and Section Eight Productions $85 million $450.7 million
The Majestic 21 December 2001 co-production with Castle Rock Entertainment, NPV Entertainment and Darkwoods Productions $72 million $37.3 million
Queen of the Damned 22 February 2002 co-production with NPV Entertainment and Material Productions $35 million $45.4 million
Showtime 15 March 2002 co-production with NPV Entertainment, Material Pictures and TriBeCa Productions $85 million $77.7 million
Eight Legged Freaks 17 July 2002 co-production with NPV Entertainment and Electric Entertainment $30 million $45 million
The Adventures of Pluto Nash 16 August 2002 co-production with Castle Rock Entertainment, NPV Entertainment and Bregman Productions $100 million $7.1 million
Ghost Ship 25 October 2002 co-production with NPV Entertainment and Dark Castle Entertainment $20 million $68.3 million
Analyze That 6 December 2002 co-production with NPV Entertainment, Baltimore Spring Creek Pictures, Face Productions and TriBeCa Productions $60 million $55 million
Two Weeks Notice 20 December 2002 co-production with Castle Rock Entertainment, NPV Entertainment and Fortis Films $60 million $199 million
Dreamcatcher 21 March 2003 co-production with Castle Rock Entertainment, NPV Entertainment, WV Films II and Kasdan Pictures $68 million $75.7 million
Fat Pizza Roadshow Films 10 April 2003 N/A $2.1 million
The Matrix Reloaded Warner Bros. Pictures 15 May 2003 co-production with NPV Entertainment and Silver Pictures $127–150 million $741.8 million
Mystic River 15 October 2003 co-production with Malpaso Productions and NPV Entertainment $25–30 million $156.6 million
The Matrix Revolutions 5 November 2003 co-production with NPV Entertainment and Silver Pictures $110–150 million $427.3 million
Torque 16 January 2004 co-production with Original Film $40 million $46.5 million
Taking Lives 19 March 2004 co-production with Atmosphere Pictures $45 million $65.4 million
Catwoman 23 July 2004 co-production with Di Novi Pictures, Frantic Films, Maple Shade Films and Catwoman Films $100 million $82.1 million
Ocean's Twelve 10 December 2004 co-production with Jerry Weintraub Productions and Section Eight Productions $110 million $362.9 million
Constantine 18 February 2005 co-production with Vertigo DC Comics, The Donners' Company, Weed Road Pictures and 3 Arts Entertainment $70–100 million $230.9 million
Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous 24 March 2005 co-production with Castle Rock Entertainment and Fortis Films $45 million $101.3 million
House of Wax 6 May 2005 co-production with Dark Castle Entertainment $40 million $70.1 million
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory 15 July 2005 co-production with Theobald Film Productions, The Zanuck Company and Plan B Entertainment $150 million $475 million
The Dukes of Hazzard 5 August 2005 co-production with Gerber Pictures $53 million $109.8 million
Rumor Has It... 25 December 2005 co-production with Section Eight Productions and Spring Creek Productions $70 million $88.9 million
Firewall 10 February 2006 co-production with Beacon Pictures and Thunder Road Pictures $50 million $82.8 million
The Lake House 16 June 2006 co-production with Vertigo Entertainment and Sidus Pictures $40 million $114.8 million
Happy Feet 17 November 2006 co-production with Animal Logic, Kennedy Miller Productions and Kingdom Feature Productions $100 million $384.3 million
Unaccompanied Minors 8 December 2006 co-production with The Donners' Company $25 million $21.9 million
Music and Lyrics 14 February 2007 co-production with Reserve Room Productions and Castle Rock Entertainment $40 million $145.9 million
The Reaping 5 April 2007 co-production with Dark Castle Entertainment $40 million $62.8 million
Lucky You 4 May 2007 co-production with Deuce Three Productions, Flower Films and Di Novi Pictures $55 million $8.4 million
Ocean's Thirteen 8 June 2007 co-production with Jerry Weintraub Productions and Section Eight Productions $85 million $311.7 million
License to Wed 3 July 2007 co-production with Phoenix Pictures, Robert Simonds Productions, Underground Films and Management and Proposal Productions $35 million $70.2 million
No Reservations 27 July 2007 co-production with Castle Rock Entertainment $28 million $92.6 million
The Invasion 17 August 2007 co-production with Silver Pictures and Vertigo Entertainment $65–80 million $40.2 million
The Brave One 14 September 2007 co-production with Silver Pictures $70 million $69 million
December Boys Warner Independent Pictures co-production with Becker Entertainment $4 million $1.2 million
Rogue Dimension Films 8 November 2007 co-production with Emu Creek Productions $25 million $4.6 million
I Am Legend Warner Bros. Pictures 14 December 2007 co-production with Weed Road Pictures, Overbrook Entertainment, Heyday Films and Original Film $150 million $585.4 million
Speed Racer 9 May 2008 co-production with Silver Pictures and Anarchos Productions $120 million $93.9 million
Get Smart 20 June 2008 co-production with Mosaic Media Group, Atlas Entertainment, Mad Chance Productions and Callahan Filmworks $80 million $230.7 million
Nights in Rodanthe 26 September 2008 co-production with Di Novi Pictures N/A $84.8 million
Gran Torino 12 December 2008 co-production with Double Nickel Entertainment and Malpaso Productions $25–33 million $270 million
Yes Man 19 December 2008 co-production with The Zanuck Company and Heyday Films $70 million $223.2 million
Where the Wild Things Are 16 October 2009 co-production with Legendary Pictures, Playtone, Wild Things Productions, KLG Film Invest GmbH and The Worldwide Maurice International Company, Inc. $100 million $100.1 million
Sherlock Holmes 25 December 2009 co-production with Silver Pictures and Wigram Productions $90 million $524 million

2010s[edit]

Title Distributor Release date Notes Budget Box office
Sex and the City 2 Warner Bros. Pictures 27 May 2010 with New Line Cinema; co-production with HBO Films $95 million $294.7 million
Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore 30 July 2010 co-production with CD2 Pictures, Mad Chance Productions and Polymorphic Pictures $85 million $112.5 million
Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole 24 September 2010 co-production with Animal Logic and GOG Productions $80 million $140.1 million
Life as We Know It 8 October 2010 co-production with Gold Circle Films and Josephson Entertainment $38 million $105.71 million
Happy Feet Two 18 November 2011 co-production with Dr. D Studios and Kennedy Miller Mitchell $135 million $150.4 million
Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows 16 December 2011 co-production with Silver Pictures and Wigram Productions $125 million $543.8 million
The Lucky One 10 April 2012 co-production with Di Novi Pictures $25 million $99.4 million
Dark Shadows 11 May 2012 co-production with Infinitum Nihil, GK Films and The Zanuck Company $150 million $245.5 million
Gangster Squad 11 January 2013 co-production with Lin Pictures and Kevin McCormick Productions $60–75 million $105.2 million
Journey to the West Huayi Brothers 10 February 2013 as Village Roadshow Pictures Asia; co-production with Bingo Movie Development, Chinavision Media Group, Edko Films, China Film Group and Huayi Brothers N/A $215 million
101 Proposals New Classics Media 12 February 2013 as Village Roadshow Pictures Asia; co-production with Fuji Television Network, China Film Group and Asia Times Cultural Media $31.2 million
The Great Gatsby Warner Bros. Pictures 10 May 2013 co-production with A&E Television, Bazmark Productions and Red Wagon Entertainment $105–190 million $353.6 million
Man of Tai Chi[32] RADiUS-TWC (North America)
Universal Pictures (International)
1 November 2013 as Village Roadshow Pictures Asia; co-production with China Film Group and Wanda Media $25 million $5.5 million
The Lego Movie Warner Bros. Pictures 7 February 2014 co-production with Warner Animation Group, RatPac-Dune Entertainment, Lego System A/S, Vertigo Entertainment and Lin Pictures $60–65 million $468.1 million
Winter's Tale 14 February 2014 co-production with RatPac-Dune Entertainment, Weed Road Pictures and Marc Platt Productions $75 million $30.8 million
Edge of Tomorrow 6 June 2014 co-production with RatPac-Dune Entertainment, 3 Arts Entertainment, Viz Productions and TC Productions $178 million $370.5 million
Into the Storm 8 August 2014 with New Line Cinema, co-production with Broken Road Productions and RatPac-Dune Entertainment $50 million $161.7 million
The Equalizer Sony Pictures Releasing 26 September 2014 co-production with Columbia Pictures, LStar Capital, Escape Artists, Mace Neufeld Productions and Zhiv Productions $55–73 million $192.3 million
The Judge Warner Bros. Pictures 10 October 2014 co-production with RatPac-Dune Entertainment, Team Downey and Big Kid Pictures $45–50 million $84.4 million
Annie Sony Pictures Releasing 19 December 2014 co-production with Columbia Pictures, Overbrook Entertainment, Olive Bridge Entertainment and Marcy Media Films $65–78 million $133.8 million
American Sniper Warner Bros. Pictures 25 December 2014 co-production with RatPac-Dune Entertainment, Mad Chance Productions, 22nd & Indiana Pictures and Malpaso Productions $59 million $547.4 million
Jupiter Ascending 6 February 2015 co-production with RatPac-Dune Entertainment and Anarchos Productions $176–210 million $183.9 million
Zhong Kui: Snow Girl and the Dark Crystal Well Go USA Entertainment (United States)
Desen International Media (China)
Warner Bros. Pictures (International)
19 February 2015 as Village Roadshow Pictures Asia; co-production with Beijing Enlight Pictures, K. Pictures and Shenzhen Wus Entertainment $30 million $64.47 million
Mad Max: Fury Road Warner Bros. Pictures 15 May 2015 co-production with RatPac-Dune Entertainment and Kennedy Miller Mitchell $154.6-185.1 million $415.2 million
San Andreas 29 May 2015 with New Line Cinema; co-production with RatPac-Dune Entertainment and Flynn Picture Company $110 million $474 million
Mountain Cry Fortissimo Films 10 October 2015 as Village Roadshow Pictures Asia; co-production with Beijing Hairun Pictures N/A
Goosebumps Sony Pictures Releasing 16 October 2015 co-production with Columbia Pictures, Sony Pictures Animation, LStar Capital, Original Film and Scholastic Entertainment $58–84 million $158.3 million
In the Heart of the Sea Warner Bros. Pictures 11 December 2015 co-production with Imagine Entertainment, RatPac-Dune Entertainment, Roth Films, COTT Productions, Enelmar Productions A.I.E., Spring Creek Pictures and Kia Jam $100 million $93.9 million
Concussion[33] Sony Pictures Releasing 25 December 2015 co-production with Columbia Pictures, LStar Capital and Scott Free Productions $35–57 million $48.6 million
The Brothers Grimsby Sony Pictures Releasing 11 March 2016 co-production with Columbia Pictures. LStar Capital, Four by Two Films, Big Talk Productions and Working Title Films $35 million $28 million
The Legend of Tarzan Warner Bros. Pictures 1 July 2016 co-production with RatPac-Dune Entertainment, Jerry Weintraub Productions, Riche/Ludwig Productions and Beaglepug Films $180 million $356.7 million
Ghostbusters Sony Pictures Releasing 15 July 2016 co-production with Columbia Pictures, The Montecito Picture Company, Pascal Pictures, Feigco Entertainment and Ghost Corps $144 million $229.1 million
Sully[34] Warner Bros. Pictures 9 September 2016 co-production with Flashlight Films, The Kennedy/Marshall Company, Malpaso Productions and Orange Corp. $60 million $240.8 million
The Magnificent Seven[citation needed] Sony Pictures Releasing 23 September 2016 co-production with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, Columbia Pictures, LStar Capital, Pin High Productions, Escape Artists and Fuqua Films $90–107 million $162.4 million
Hide and Seek[citation needed] N/A 4 November 2016 as Village Roadshow Pictures Asia; co-production with New Clues Films N/A
Collateral Beauty[citation needed] Warner Bros. Pictures 16 December 2016 co-production with New Line Cinema, RatPac-Dune Entertainment, Overbrook Entertainment, Anonymous Content, PalmStar Media and Likely Story $36–40.3 million $88.5 million
Passengers[citation needed] Sony Pictures Releasing 21 December 2016 co-production with Columbia Pictures, LStar Capital, Wanda Pictures, Original Film, Company Films and Start Motion Pictures $110–150 million $303.1 million
Fist Fight[35] Warner Bros. Pictures 17 February 2017 co-production with New Line Cinema, 21 Laps Entertainment, Wrigley Pictures and RatPac-Dune Entertainment $22–25 million $41.1 million
Going in Style[citation needed] 7 April 2017 co-production with New Line Cinema, RatPac-Dune Entertainment and De Line Pictures $25 million $84.9 million
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword[35] 12 May 2017 co-production with RatPac-Dune Entertainment, Weed Road Pictures, Safehouse Pictures and Ritchie/Wigram Productions $175 million $148.7 million
The House[citation needed] 30 June 2017 co-production with New Line Cinema, Gary Sanchez Productions and Good Universe $40 million $34.2 million
Bleeding Steel[citation needed] Lionsgate Films 22 December 2017 as Village Roadshow Pictures Asia; co-production with Heyi Pictures and Perfect World Pictures $65 million $48.8 million
The 15:17 to Paris[36] Warner Bros. Pictures 9 February 2018 co-production with Malpaso Productions and Access Entertainment $30 million $57.1 million
Ready Player One[35] 29 March 2018 co-production with Amblin Partners, Amblin Entertainment, Access Entertainment, De Line Pictures and Farah Films & Management $155–175 million $592.2 million
Ocean's 8[35] 8 June 2018 co-production with Smokehouse Pictures and Larger Than Life Productions $70 million $297.8 million
Joker[citation needed] 4 October 2019 co-production with Bron Creative, Joint Effort and DC Films $55–70 million $1.074 billion

2020s[edit]

Title Distributor Release date Notes Budget Box office
The Matrix Resurrections Warner Bros. Pictures 22 December 2021 co-production with Venus Castina Productions and Deutscher Filmförderfonds $190 million $159.2 million
Cinnamon Tubi 23 June 2023 co-production with Fox Entertainment Studios and Content Cartel Studios N/A
Murder City 29 June 2023
Wonka Warner Bros. Pictures 15 December 2023 co-production with Heyday Films and The Roald Dahl Story Company $125 million $605.8 million

Upcoming[edit]

Title Distributor Release date Notes
Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga[37] Warner Bros. Pictures 24 May 2024 co-production with Kennedy Miller Mitchell
Joker: Folie à Deux[38] 4 October 2024 co-production with Bron Creative, Joint Effort and DC Studios
Ready Player Two[39] TBA co-production with Amblin Entertainment, De Line Pictures and Farah Films & Management
San Andreas 2[40] co-production with Flynn Picture Company
Sherlock Holmes 3[41] co-production with Rideback, Team Downey and Silver Pictures
Training Day: Day of the Riot[42] co-production with Outlaw Productions
The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon[43] TBA co-production with Vertigo Entertainment, Stampede Ventures, Sanibel Films and Origin Story
I Am Legend 2[44] Warner Bros. Pictures co-production with Westbrook Studios, Weed Road Pictures and Outlier Society

Television series[edit]

Year Series Network Notes Seasons Episodes
1993-1994 Paradise Beach[6] Nine Network co-production with Genesis Entertainment 2 260
1995-1999 Flipper[6] Syndication/PAX first three seasons only; co-production with Samuel Goldwyn Television, Tribune Entertainment and MGM Television 5 61
1995-1996 Space: Above and Beyond[45] Fox co-production with Hard Eight Pictures and 20th Century Fox Television 1 23
1996-1997 Pacific Drive[6] Nine Network co-production with New World Entertainment 2 390
1997-1998 Night Man[46] Syndication season 1 only; co-production with Glen Larson Entertainment Network, Atlantis Films and Tribune Entertainment 1 22
1998-1999 Tales of the South Seas[6] Network Ten co-production with CLT-UFA, Gaumont Television and South Pacific Pictures
Skippy: Adventures in Bushtown Nine Network co-production with Yoram Gross Film Studios, Teleimages I-T-I and Videal 26
Dumb Bunnies CBS co-production with Yoram Gross Film Studios, Nelvana and Scottish Television Enterprises

Television movies[edit]

Title Network Release date Notes
Trapped in Space Sci-Fi Channel 19 October 1994 co-production with CNM Entertainment and Wilshire Court Productions
Sahara Showtime 25 April 1995 co-production with TriStar Television
The Ticket USA Network 6 August 1997 co-production with CNM Entertainment and Wilshire Court Productions
Meteorites! 3 June 1998 co-production with Wilshire Court Productions
The Fury Within 28 October 1998 co-production with Wilshire Court Productions
Alien Cargo UPN 28 January 1999 co-production with Wilshire Court Productions
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World TNT 3 April 1999 pilot movie only; co-production with St. Clare Entertainment, Telescene and The Fremantle Corporation
Monster UPN 12 November 1999 co-production with Wilshire Court Productions
The Magicians 10 March 2000 co-production with Wilshire Court Productions
Code 11-14 CBS 24 August 2003 co-production with Wilshire Court Productions and Carlton America

Television miniseries[edit]

Title Network Release date Notes Episodes
The Thorn Birds: The Missing Years CBS 11–13 February 1996 co-production with The Wolper Organization and Warner Bros. Television 2
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea ABC 11–12 May 1997 co-production with The Frederick S. Pierce Company

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lang, Brent (19 April 2017). "Village Roadshow Sells Controlling Stake". Variety. Retrieved 19 April 2017.
  2. ^ Groves, Don (26 February 2015). "Village Roadshow Pictures Bets on Three Potential Hollywood Franchises". Forbes. Retrieved 15 March 2016.
  3. ^ Ellingson, Annlee (14 September 2015). "Village Roadshow closes $480 million in capital for 'Ghostbusters,' Spielberg flick". Los Angeles Business. Retrieved 15 March 2016.
  4. ^ Eller, Claudia (5 March 2009). "For Warner and Roadshow Studios, No Need to Analyze Joint Ventures". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 15 March 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d Cheney, Alexandra (5 May 2014). "Village Roadshow Inks Co-Finance Deal with Sony Pictures (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Variety Media. Retrieved 30 November 2015.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Goldsmith, Ben (2010). Local Hollywood. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 9780702238017.
  7. ^ Denison, Rayna (26 May 2015). Superheroes on World Screens. University Press of Mississippi. ISBN 9781626746749.
  8. ^ Groves, Don (3 March 1994). "Asian market boom may be local". Variety. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  9. ^ "Paradise found" (PDF). Broadcasting Magazine. 14 December 1992. p. 18. Retrieved 8 June 2023.
  10. ^ Groves, Don (18 September 1995). "Roadshow subsid bows TV division". Variety. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  11. ^ Littleton, Cynthia (2 October 1995). "Village Roadshow expands TV reach" (PDF). Broadcasting & Cable. p. 30. Retrieved 8 June 2023.
  12. ^ Groves, Don (24 April 1995). "VILLAGE ROADSHOW MOVES INTO PIX SALES". Variety. Retrieved 14 June 2023.
  13. ^ a b Muttalib, Bashirah (11 May 2000). "Yoram Gross Studios flips for animated series". Variety. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  14. ^ Petrikin, Chris; Weiner, Rex (21 April 1997). "Intermedia & Roadshow link". Variety. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  15. ^ Cox, Dan (15 October 1997). "Village, Intermedia split". Variety. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  16. ^ Guider, Elizabeth (7 October 1997). "Yoram Gross, EM.TV pact". Variety. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  17. ^ "Lake takes new post at Village Roadshow". Variety. 4 September 1997. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  18. ^ Karon, Paul (10 December 1997). "WB takes a Village". Variety. Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  19. ^ Cox, Dan (15 October 1997). "Village, Intermedia split". Variety. Retrieved 14 June 2023.
  20. ^ Groves, Don (2 October 1998). "Roadshow will ankle L.A." Variety. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  21. ^ Carver, Benedict (29 October 1998). "Village's Roadshow". Variety. Retrieved 14 June 2023.
  22. ^ Groves, Don (9 October 1998). "Village goes Beyond". Variety. Retrieved 14 June 2023.
  23. ^ Fritz, Ben (26 November 2012). "Village Roadshow, Warner Bros. renew film finance deal". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 14 June 2023.
  24. ^ "Village Roadshow Entertainment Group Secures $480M in Capital". www.businesswire.com. 14 September 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2023.
  25. ^ Lang, Brent (19 April 2017). "Village Roadshow Sells Controlling Stake". Variety. Retrieved 14 June 2023.
  26. ^ Hipes, Patrick (25 October 2018). "Steve Mosko Lands At Village Roadshow Entertainment Group As CEO". Deadline. Retrieved 25 October 2018.
  27. ^ Kroll, Justin (10 September 2021). "David Goyer's Phantom Four Films Signs First-Look Deal With Village Roadshow, Sets 'Reincarnation Of Peter Proud' As First Project". Deadline. Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  28. ^ Lang, Brent (27 September 2021). "Bruce Berman Steps Down as Village Roadshow Pictures CEO, Ending 24-Year Run". Variety. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  29. ^ Jackson, Angelique (14 December 2021). "Village Roadshow and Kevin Garnett Launch Black Noir Cinema Franchise on Tubi (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Retrieved 6 July 2023.
  30. ^ "TUBI STRIKES MAJOR FILM DEAL WITH VILLAGE ROADSHOW ENTERTAINMENT GROUP". stylemagazine.com. Retrieved 6 July 2023.
  31. ^ "Miramax takes domestic rights to CTHV's 'Fortress'". 5 April 1993. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  32. ^ Davidson, Mike (20 May 2013). "Keanu Reeves makes director debut with Kung Fu film". Reuters. Retrieved 30 July 2019.
  33. ^ Busch, Anita (30 September 2015). "'Concussion' To Get World Premiere at AFI Fest". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  34. ^ "Film releases". Variety Insight. Archived from the original on 2 March 2016. Retrieved 28 August 2018.
  35. ^ a b c d "Film releases". Variety Insight. Archived from the original on 18 February 2017. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  36. ^ "Film releases". Variety Insight. Archived from the original on 5 February 2018. Retrieved 10 February 2018.
  37. ^ Slatter, Sean (19 April 2021). "George Miller's 'Mad Max' prequel 'Furiosa' to film in NSW". IF Magazine. Retrieved 19 April 2021.
  38. ^ Gonzalez, Umberto (10 December 2022). "'Joker 2': Joaquin Phoenix Returns in First Look at Sequel (Photo)". TheWrap. Retrieved 11 December 2022.
  39. ^ Houghton, Rianne (22 December 2020). "Ready Player Two movie is in the works despite brutal reviews". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on 24 December 2020. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  40. ^ Webb, Katherine (12 April 2020). "San Andreas 2? Alexandra Daddario Still Sounds Game For Sequel With Dwayne Johnson". CinemaBlend.
  41. ^ "Film releases". Variety Insight. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  42. ^ Snider, Jeff (10 October 2019). "Exclusive: 'Training Day' Prequel in the Works at Warner Bros". Collider. Archived from the original on 12 October 2019. Retrieved 11 October 2019.
  43. ^ N'Duka, Amanda (30 April 2020). "Village Roadshow Boards Film Adaptation Of Stephen King Novel 'The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon'; Christy Hall Scripting". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 24 November 2020.
  44. ^ France, Lisa Respers (16 February 2023). "'I Am Legend' sequel will rely on alternate ending of original". CNN. Retrieved 18 February 2023.
  45. ^ Bierbaum, Tom (25 September 1995). "Space: Above and Beyond". Variety. Retrieved 8 June 2023.
  46. ^ Woods, Mark (7 February 1997). "Easy living for TV producers". Variety. Retrieved 8 June 2023.

External links[edit]