List of Lucchese crime family mobsters

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This article is about current and past members of the Lucchese crime family.

Contents

Current members[edit]

Peter Argentina[edit]

Peter Argentina is a soldier and younger brother to Ray Argentina, a made member in the family. In 1992, he was acquitted of participating in an armored car heist.[1] On June 21, 2011, Carl Lastorino, the son of Frank Lastorino, shot Argentina in the hand and shoulder. While escaping Carl Lastorino was shot to death by the police.[2]

Carmine Avellino[edit]

Carmine Avellino (born July 15, 1944) is a capo and younger brother to Salvatore Avellino a made member in the family. In 1984, Avellino and his brother Salvatore had a sitdown with Bonanno crime family members Steven Cannone, Joseph Massino, Salvatore Vitale over King Caterers.[3] It was decided that Avellino would leave King Caterers, a Farmingdale, Long Island company that sold pre-cooked dishes to street vendors alone because the company was protected by the Bonanno family.[4] In 1995, Avellino was indicted along with his brother Salvatore Avellino, Anthony Baratta, Frank Federico and Rocco Vitulli for the August 1989, murders of Robert Kubecka and Donald Barstow.[5][6] Avellino was released from prison on February 25, 2004.[7] On May 13, 2014, Avellino was charged with sending Lucchese associates and brothers Michael and Daniel Capra, in 2010 to collect a $100,000 loan and assaulted the victim.[8] On August 12, 2016, Avellino plead guilty to an extortionate collection of credit conspiracy. On May 23, 2017, Avellino was sentenced to 1 year of house arrest, 5 years probation and fined $100,000.[9] His lawyer said at the trial that Avellino has suffered 2 heart attacks and is suffering from Parkinson's disease.[10]

Anthony Baratta[edit]

Anthony "Bowat" Baratta (born July 3, 1938) is a made man and former capo in the Lucchese family.[11] In 1978, Baratta became a made man in the Lucchese crime family operating under the family's Bronx faction.[11] Baratta owned a restaurant in East Harlem and regularly spent time at Rao's on Pleasant Avenue.[12] In the early 1980s, Anthony Baratta was promoted caporegime (or capo) of the "Harlem Crew", controlling the Pleasant Avenue narcotics ring in East Harlem and other rackets in the Bronx and Long Island.[13] Baratta placed soldier Joseph "Joey Bang Bang" Massaro in charge of running his Long Island topless bars operations.[13][14] In 1980, Massaro started a feud with the Bonanno crime family, when he began taking over their topless bars.[14] FBI agent Joseph D. Pistone, who was working undercover in the Bonanno family as "Donnie Brasco", heard of the two families having a sitdown over Long Island topless bars.[13][14]

In November 1989, Baratta along with boss Vic Amuso, underboss Anthony Casso, capos Al D'Arco, Sal Avellino, Peter Chiodo, Bobby Amuso and Frank Lastorino inducted Richie Pagliarulo, Mike DeSantis, Frank Federico and two others into the crime family.[15] In January 1991, boss Vic Amuso and underboss Anthony Casso were hiding they promoted Alphonse D'Arco to acting boss, Baratta was promoted to acting underboss and Steven Crea, a Bronx soldier was promoted to acting consigliere.[12] In 1991, Baratta serving as acting underboss viewed a Genovese family list of proposed new members, he commented to D'Arco, after seeing the name Ralph Desimone "He is a rat.".[16] A sitdown was arranged between the two family's. The Genovese family acting boss Liborio Bellomo, acting underboss Michael Generoso and consigliere James Ida attended the meeting to discuss "Ralph Desimone" with Lucchese family acting boss Alphonse D'Arco and Baratta as acting underboss.[16] The Genovese leaders asked Baratta about Desimone he said "Desimone had been a government witness", the Genovese leaders leave saying "will take care of it".[16] On June 13, 1991 Desimone's dead body was found in a trunk of a car at LaGuardia Airport.[16]

FBI surveillance photograph of Baratta, Lastorino and Chiodo

In early September 1991, Amuso demoted D'Arco and created a "Ruling panel" to run the family, Baratta became a member along with Salvatore Avellino, Frank Lastorino and Alpnonse D'Arco.[17] Baratta was also given control of the Garment center racket with Sidney Liberman.[17] Amuso transferred Patty Dellorusso, a soldier in charge of running the airport rackets from Al D'Arco crew into Baratta's crew.[17] Baratta was in charge of arranging the panel meetings the first was held in East Harlem.[17] On September 18, 1991, Baratta along with capo Frank Lastorino and soldiers Mike DeSantis and Frankie Frederico conspired to kill Alphonse D'Arco in the Kimberly Hotel in Manhattan but failed, D'Arco defected on September 21, 1991 and became a government witness.[18][19] The ruling panel continued to control the family in October 1991, they inducted (made) Thomas D'Ambrosia, Joseph Tortorello, Jr., Frank Gioia, Jr., Gregory Cappello and Jody Calabrese into the Lucchese family.[11] In June 1992, Baratta was jailed [11] on murder and racketeering charges.[11][20]

In November 1993, Baratta took a plea deal [11] and was sentenced to fifteen years in prison.[21] In January 1995, Baratta was indicted along with Carmine Avellino, Frank Federico and Rocco Vitulli on the August 1989, murders of Robert M. Kubecka and Donald Barstow two executives of a Long Island trash-collection company.[22][23] In September 1996, Baratta was imprisoned in the Otisville Federal Correctional Institution.[21] He began working with DeCavalcante crime family associates in trafficking Asian heroin.[21] On September 23, 1997, Baratta along with Albert Puco and twelve others were arrested and charged with conspiracy to sell narcotics.[24] Baratta was sentenced to eight years in prison. Baratta was released from prison on September 25, 2012.[25]

John Baudanza[edit]

John Baudanza is a soldier, operating in his father-in-law Domenico Cutaia's crew.[26] His father Carmine and uncle Joseph are both members of the Colombo crime family. During the early 1990s, Baudanza worked with his cousin Joseph M. Baudanza running stock fraud crimes for the Colombo family.[27] He married Danielle Cutaia the daughter of Domenico Cutaia a capo in the Lucchese family.[26] In 1995, he was inducted into the Lucchese family.[26]

On March 23, 2006, Baudanza was indicted along with his father Carmine, his uncle Joseph, Colombo family soldier Craig Marino, Colombo family associates Craig Leszczak, Robert Podlog and Arthur Gunning on racketeering charges related to operating a "pump and dump" stock scam.[28] He pleaded guilty on April 17, 2007, to extortion charges. In December 2007, he was sentenced to seven years in prison.[29] In February 2008, Baudanza was indicted along with his father-in-law capo Domenico Cutaia, soldiers Salavatore Cutaia, Michael Corcione, associates Steven Lapella, Victor Sperber, Louis Colello, and John Rodopolous on loansharking, illegal gambling and extortion charges.[30] He was released from prison on July 31, 2015.[31]

Dominic Capelli[edit]

Dominic "Nicky Pepsi" Capelli is a soldier in the family. On October 1, 2009, Capelli was indicted along with acting capo Andrew DiSimone and associates John Alevis, Peter Veltri, Tomislav Dobrilovic, Seth Trustman, Steven Mayer, Clemente Castracucco, Edgar Concepcion, Paul Cuzzo, Ernest Cuzzo, Anthony Cuzzo, Vincent Laface, Thomas Mantey, Paul Aust, Philip Mercurio, Michael Silverman, Anthony Garcia and Osama Ghoubrial on bribery and illegal gambling charges uncovered during the federal investigation dubbed "Operation Open House".[32][33] On March 27, 2018 the FBI concluded its investigation deemed “Operation The Vig Is Up” and three separate indictments were released the first charged Capelli and his crew based out of New Rochelle with loan sharking and bookmaking activities the second charged Michael Lepore and Vincent Tardibuono with running an online bookmaking operation via website and the finale indictment charged Lucien Cappello with criminal sale of a controlled substance.[34] Capelli was arrested and charged along with his crew of associates Robert Wagner, Frank McKiernan, Anthony Martino, Michael Wagner, Steve Murray, Seth Trustman, Richard Caccavale, Robert Wagner Jr. and Jessica Bismark on loan-sharking operation operating from the Bronx and Westchester County that collected interest payouts exceeding a million dollars just during the approximately one-year investigation.[35]

John Capra[edit]

John "Johnny Hooks" Capra (born April 6, 1940) is a current capo with operations in the Bronx and Westchester. In the early 2000s, the New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice secretly recorded conversations during one of these conversations Matthew Madonna discussed how they placed John Capra in charge of the New Jersey crew in order to bring back peace between the factions.[36] Capra was later succeeded as capo of the New Jersey crew by Nicodemo S. Scarfo, who was later replaced by Ralph V. Perna.[36] In 2005, Capra was indicted along with Lucchese family associates Al Alvarez and Mark Denuzio, Genovese crime family soldier Pasquale Deluca, Gambino crime family acting boss Arnold Squitieri, acting underboss Anthony Megale, capo Gregory DePalma and others on extortion charges in Westchester and illegal gambling charges in the Bronx.[37][38] Capra received an eighteen-month sentence[39] and was released from federal prison on September 10, 2008.[40]

Robert Caravaggio[edit]

Robert "Bucky the Boss" Caravaggio is a soldier and former capo of the New Jersey faction. From 1986 to 1988, Caravaggio was one of the twenty defendants in the 21-month-long trial of Lucchese crime family's New Jersey faction.[41] In August 1997, Caravaggio, along with other members of the Lucchese family's New Jersey faction, was indicted and charged with racketeering, loan-sharking and gambling.[42] In 2004, the New Jersey Commission of Investigation stated that Caravaggio was the head of the Lucchese crime family's North Jersey faction.[43] Caravaggio was overseeing operations in Northern Jersey, especially in Morris County.[44]

Joseph Caridi[edit]

Joseph "Joe C." Caridi (born 1949), the former Consigliere of the family. He resides in East Northport. He was nicknamed by the media the "Tony Soprano of Long Island" for running his crew from "Sinderella" a strip club in Brentwood similar to the "Bada Bing!" in the TV crime drama The Sopranos.[45] In the early 2000s, he worked closely with former acting boss Louis Daidone and was picked up in wiretaps discussing loan sharking, extortion and drug dealing with Daidone and other Brooklyn faction mobsters.[46]

On November 14, 2002, the police arrested Caridi along with Aniello "Neil" Colello, Ronald Galiano, Milton Bialostok,[45] John Cerrella, Vincent Mancione, Carmelo Profeta, Vincent Salanardi and other wiseguys, who were charged with enterprise corruption.[47] The charges included loan-sharking, gambling, construction payoffs, restaurant extortion and other profit-skimming operation that stretched from Suffolk County to the Bronx.[48] In December 2002, Caridi, along with capo John Cerrella and others, was indicted on extortion charges.[49] Caridi's crew took control of the Hudson & McCoy Fish House restaurant in Freeport, Long Island, after the owner asked him for help.[49] The owner's partner, Lewis Kasman, a Gambino crime family associate, had been stealing money from the restaurant. Caridi's crew successfully removed Lewis and started stealing up to $10,000 per night from the restaurant.[49] He also forced the owner to buy his Italian bread from a Colombo crime family soldier.[49] After the indictment soldier Vincent Salanardi began cooperating with the government while he continued to collect gambling debts. On March 23, 2003, Caridi pleaded guilty to extortion, to federal tax evasion and to running a sports betting operation from his home in East Northport.[50] As part of this federal plea agreement, the State of New York dropped its November 2002 charges.[50] On November 27, 2009, Caridi was released from prison.[51][52]

Eugene Castelle[edit]

Eugene "Boopsie" Castelle is a soldier and former capo of the Bensonhurst Crew. Castelle has two brothers John Castellucci a member of the Bensonhurst crew and Anthony Castelle the owner of "Coney Island Container" a private carting company that came under investigation for a suspicious fire in 2009.[53] In 1997, Castelle was charged with bribing guards to smuggle food and steroids into the Brookyln Metropolitan Detention Center.[54] In early 2000, Castelle served as acting underboss, while operating from Bath Ave in Brooklyn.[55] On November 12, 2000, Castelle was indicted along with capo Joseph Tangorra, soldiers Joseph Truncale and Scott Gervasi and associates John Castellucci, Lester Ellis and Robert Greenberg on drug trafficking, extortion and loansharking charges.[56] On August 28, 2008, Castelle was released from prison.[57] On May 26, 2016, Eugene Castelle along with Anthony Grecco, Gaetano "Tommy" Zuccarello, Vincent Mormile, Theodore Vasilakis and Ioannis "John" Dinos [58] were arrested and charged with running an online gambling operation that made over $13 million.[59] On January 12, 2018, Castelle, along with Bonanno family Acting Boss Joseph Cammarano Jr. and seven other members of the Bonanno family and one member of the Genovese family were arrested and charged with racketeering and loan sharking related offenses.[60][61] In the indictment Castelle was charged with conspiracy to commit extortion.[62][63]

John Castellucci[edit]

John "Big John" Castelle (born June 18, 1959), also known as "John Castellucci",[64] is the current capo of the Bensonhurst Crew.[65] Castellucci has two brothers, Eugene Castelle, a member of the Bensonhurst crew, and Anthony Castelle, the owner of "Coney Island Container", a private carting company that came under investigation for a suspicious fire in 2009.[53] On November 12, 2000, Castellucci was indicted along with acting underboss Eugene Castelle, capo Joseph Tangorra, soldiers Joseph Truncale and Scott Gervasi and associates Lester Ellis and Robert Greenberg on drug trafficking, extortion and loansharking charges.[56] Castellucci was released from prison on October 20, 2004.[66] On May 31, 2017, John Castelucci along with Street Boss Matthew Madonna, Underboss Steven Crea Sr., Consigliere Joseph DiNapoli and other members of the family were indicted and charged with racketeering, murder, narcotics (cocaine, heroin, marijuana, prescribed medication), and firearms offenses.[67][68]

John Cerrella[edit]

John "Sideburns" Cerrella is a soldier and former capo. During the 1970s, Cerrella was a soldier in the Genovese family operating in Broward County, Florida.[69] Cerrella worked with soldier Vincent Romano in South Florida.[70] In 1977, Cerrella was sentenced to 16 years for extorting valet businesses in Fort Lauderdale and was released in 1983.[69] In 1998, Cerrella was indicted along with Vincent Romano and others on illegal gambling charges.[71] In 2002, Cerrella was indicted along with consigliere Joseph Caridi, soldier Vincent Salanardi and others.[49] The group was charged with extorting the Hudson & McCoy Fish House restaurant in Freeport, Long Island.[49] On November 27, 2009, Cerrella was released from prison.[72] In 2011, the FBI discovered a list of contacts that included Cerrella and others in Bonanno family soldier Mike Virtuoso's butcher shop on Graham Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.[73]

Domenico Cutaia[edit]

Domenico "Danny" Cutaia (born November 22, 1936 East New York Brooklyn), is the capo of the Vario Crew operating from Brooklyn. His son Salvatore Cutaia is a member of his crew.[30] His daughter Danielle married John Baudanza, who later became a member of the Lucchese family.[74] Cutaia worked as a loan shark and as a chauffeur for capo Paul Vario.[75] While working for capo Paul Vario, Cutaia also controlled some illegal gambling operations and had control of the carpenters union local in Brooklyn.[75] He later took over becoming capo of Vario's crew in Brooklyn.[76] In 1995, Cutaia was indicted for extortion, loan sharking, and racketeering; in 1996, he pled guilty to extortionate extensions of credit and was sentenced to thirty months in prison.[77][30] In 2002, Cutaia was indicted on loan sharking charges; he pled guilty and was sentenced to two years and three years of supervised probation upon his release.[77] In August 2005, he was released from prison.[77]

His parole terms banned him from communicating with family members until August 2008. However, in January 2007 it was reported that Cutaia was the primary liaison between jailed boss Vittorio "Vic" Amuso and three man panel of capos, who were running the family.[78] On February 28, 2008, Cutaia, his son Salvatore, his son-in-law John Baudanza, and former acting capo Michael Corcione were indicted on federal racketeering charges that included loansharking, extortionate collection of credit, extortion, marijuana distribution conspiracy, illegal gambling, bank fraud, and mail fraud for activities dating back to the 1980s.[30][79] On October 25, 2009, Cutaia was sentenced to 39 months in federal prison for bank fraud. At the sentencing, Cutaia's attorney asked the court for home confinement, saying that Cutaia suffered from depression and advanced multiple sclerosis; the request was denied.[80] In October 2012, Cutaia was sentenced to one year in prison for loan sharking.[81] Cutaia was released from prison on October 4, 2013.[82]

Salvatore Cutaia[edit]

Salvatore Cutaia is a soldier operating in his father's Domenico Cutaia crew. His son Joseph Cutaia is an associate in the Lucchese family. In 2008, Cutaia was indicted along with his father capo Domenico Cutaia, soldiers John Baudanza, Michael Corcione, associates Steven Lapella, Victor Sperber, Louis Colello, on loansharking, illegal gambling and extortion charges.[30] On February 24, 2010, Cutaia was indicted along with father capo Domenico Cutaia, soldier Carlo Profeta, his son associate Joseph Cutaia, associates Eric Maione and Nicholas Bernardo, Bonanno family capo Anthony Mannone and associate Jerome Carameilli and John Rodopolous on racketeering and extortion charges.[30][83] Cutaia was released from prison on September 14, 2016.[84]

George Conte[edit]

George "Georgie Goggles" Conte (born July 25, 1960) is a soldier, and former capo. In 1991, Conte along with other capos inducted five new members into the crime family.[20] The ceremony was held in a Howard Beach, Queens and Conte filled in for capo George Zappola and sponsored Frank Gioia Jr.[11] In January 1996, Conte and George Zappola were indicted and charged with murdering James D. Bishop, the former head of the painters union.[85][86] In 1996, Conte was indicted along with soldier James Galione and other members on drug dealing charges in Brooklyn.[87] Conte was released from prison on March 10, 2014.[88]

Michael Corcione[edit]

Michael "Mikey Bones" Corcione is a soldier and former acting capo in Domenico Cutaia's crew.[89] In 2008, Corcione was indicted along with capo Domenico Cutaia, soldiers John Baudanza, Salvatore Cutaia, associates Steven Lapella, Victor Sperber, Louis Colello, and John Rodopolous on loansharking, illegal gambling and extortion charges.[30] On July 3, 2012, Corcione was released from prison.[90]

Tindaro Corso[edit]

Tindaro "Tino" Corso (born 1961) is a soldier and current acting capo operating from Staten Island and Manhattan. Corso was indicted along with Anthony Tortorello in 1997.[91] On May 31, 2017, Corso along with Street Boss Matthew Madonna, Underboss Steven Crea Sr., Consigliere Joseph DiNapoli, Capo Steven Crea Jr., Capo Dominic Truscello, Capo John Castelucci, Soldier(s) Joseph Venice, James Maffucci, Joseph Datello, Paul Cassano, Christopher Londonio and Associate(s) Terrence Caldwell, Vincent Bruno, Brian Vaughan, Carmine Garcia, Richard O'Connor, Robert Camilli and John Incatasciato were indicted and charged with racketeering, murder, narcotics (cocaine, heroin, marijuana, prescription medication), and firearms offenses.[67][68] The indictment builds on charges previously filed against Lucchese soldier Christopher Londonio and Lucchese associate Terrence Caldwell who were charged in February 2017 with racketeering offenses, including the murder of Michael Meldish in the Bronx on November 15, 2013.[92]

Joseph Cosentino[edit]

Joseph "Joey Blue Eyes" Cosentino is a soldier.[1] His two sons Joseph and Adam became mobsters.[93] During the 1950s, Cosentino and John Petrucelli operated in Pelham Parkway for the Lucchese family.[93] On September 13, 1989, Consentino and Anthony Mangano murdered Petrucelli on his front lawn in White Plains, New York for harboring Gus Farace.[93] Cosentino was released from prison on October 18, 1993.[94]

Steven Crea Jr.[edit]

Steven Crea Jr. (born 1972) is a current capo in the family and the son of Steven Crea. On May 31, 2017, Crea Jr. along with Street Boss Matthew Madonna, his father Underboss Steven Crea Sr., Consigliere Joseph DiNapoli, Capo Dominic Truscello, Capo John Castelucci, Acting Capo Tindaro Corso and other members of the family were indicted and charged with racketeering, murder, narcotics (cocaine, heroin, marijuana, prescribed medication), and firearms offenses.[67][68] The indictment builds on charges previously filed against a reputed Lucchese soldier and associate in February 2017 with the murder of Michael Meldish in the Bronx on November 15, 2013; Mathew Madonna, Crea, and Crea Jr. were charged and suspected of serving as co-conspirators in the Meldish gangland exuection too.[67][68][92]

Anthony Croce[edit]

Anthony Croce is a soldier and former acting capo. In November 2008, Croce was arrested for running a sport gambling ring operating in the Bronx and Manhattan.[95] In October 2009, Croce along with Joseph DiNapoli, Matthew Madonna and 26 other members of the Lucchese family were indicted on bribery, loansharking, gun trafficking, extortion, gambling and racketeering charges.[96] In November 2009, Croce was indicted in "Operation Night Gallery" along with soldier Joseph Datello on illegal gambling charges.[97] He controlled the sports gambling operations from Datello's bar "Night Gallery" in New Dorp, Staten Island.[98] The indictment also stated Croce would have conversations with mobsters on the streets of the Financial District and the Staten Island Ferry.[98]

Joseph Datello[edit]

Joseph "Big Joe" Datello (born May 16, 1951) is a soldier in the "Prince Street Crew". In December 1999, Datello and Steven Crea talked about bribery and extortion with Sean Richard, the son-in-law of John Riggi who was wearing a hidden recording device.[99] On September 6, 2000, the district attorney used the information obtained from Richard's to indict [99] Datello, Steven Crea, Joseph Tangorra and Dominic Truscello, soldiers Philip DeSimone, Arthur Zambardi, Anthony Pezzullo, and Joseph Truncale on labor racketeering, extortion, and bid-rigging charges.[100] On March 7, 2003, Datello pleaded guilty to extorting "Commercial Brick" a construction company, wire fraud in relation to a construction project at the Park Central Hotel, and loansharking.[101] He was released from prison on August 5, 2005.[102] In November 2009, Datello was indicted along with acting capo Anthony Croce and charged with running a sports gambling operations from his bar "Night Gallery" in New Dorp, Staten Island.[98] On May 31, 2017, Datello along with Street Boss Matthew Madonna, Underboss Steven Crea Sr., Consigliere Joseph DiNapoli, Capo Steven Crea Jr., Capo Dominic Truscello, Capo John Castelucci, Acting Capo Tindaro Corso and other members of the family were indicted and charged with racketeering, murder, narcotics (cocaine, heroin, marijuana, prescribed medication), and firearms offenses.[67][68]

Andrew DiSimone[edit]

Andrew DiSimone is a soldier and former acting capo. On October 1, 2009, DiSimone was indicted along with soldier Dominic Capelli and associate John Alevis on bribery and illegal gambling charges.[32] The bribery charges dated back to 2006 and 2007 when DiSimone and others tried to bribe a NYPD sergeant and a detective, who were posing undercover in "Operation Open House" as corrupt officers, to protect illegal gambling operations around the city.[103] On August 7, 2013, DiSimone was released from prison.[104]

Salvatore DiSimone[edit]

Salvatore "Sally Bo" DiSimone (sometimes spelled DeSimone), is a soldier and former capo. His son Anthony was a member of the Tanglewood Boys.[105] In 1994, his son Anthony went into hiding after the murder of Louis Balancio.[105] In 1999, his son Anthony turned himself in to the police and was sentenced in 2000 to 25 years to life.[106] In 2005, the FBI revealed that DiSimone and Lucchese soldier Daniel Latella had meetings in doctor offices with Gambino family capo Greg DePalma.[107]

James Galione[edit]

James "Jimmy Frogs" Galione is a soldier.[1] In October 1996, Galione was indicted and charged with running a crack-cocaine ring that operated in Bensonhurst and Bay Ridge, Brooklyn since 1992.[87] In 1997, Galione and Mario Gallo pleaded guilty to the murder of Bonanno/Colombo families associate Constable "Gus" Farace in 1989. Galione was released from prison on December 24, 2015.[108]

Joseph Giampa[edit]

Joseph "Joey" Giampa a former capo operating in the Bronx.[109] Giampa ran an auto shop on Boston Post Road in the Bronx.[109] Along with his brother Santo "Jay" Giampa, he ran a loan sharking racket in Hunts Point Markets in the Bronx.[109] In 1990, Giampa was order by Amuso and Casso to murder his former capo Michael Salerno.[109] In 1992, Giampa was charged with murder and later was acquitted.[110] In December 1993, Giampa and his stepson Gennaro Vittorio decided to trust Richard Sabol, a government informant in establishing a company to import and export large amounts of heroin and cocaine in Bergen County, New Jersey.[110] Giampa then began planning with capo Anthony Baratta to smuggle drugs and firearms into New Jersey.[110] In February 1994, Gennaro Vittorio learned from New York City police officer Vincent Davis that Sabol was a government informant.[111] In August 1994, Giampa was indicted along with Gennaro Vittorio, Joseph Gaito, Guy Fatato, Benjamin Segarra, Louis Dorval, Elliot Porco, and John Capra on racketeering charges.[110] In August 1995, Giampa was found guilty of conspiring to establish gambling operations and racketeering in New Jersey.[112] On September 21, 2001, Giampa was released from prison.[113]

Frank Lastorino[edit]

Frank "Big Frank" Lastorino (April 9, 1939) is a made man, a former capo and served as consigliere in the past in the Lucchese family. Lastorino was formally inducted into the crime family in 1987.[20] In the late 1980s, the family's consigliere Christopher Furnari appointed Lastorino in charge of the Lucchese family's portion of a bootleg gasoline scheme with Russian mobster Marat Balagula.[114] In August 1990, Lastorino was ordered by Anthony Casso to murder mobster Bruno Facciola.[115] The orders to murder Facciola were given after Casso had received information from two NYPD police detectives Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa on his payroll that Bruno Facciola was an informant.[115] On August 24, 1990, Frank Lastorino, Louie Daidone and Richard Pagliarulo murdered Bruno Facciola.[116] Lastorino arranged to bring Facciola to a Brooklyn garage, inside the garage Lastorino stabbed Facciola and Pagliarulo shot him six times in the face and chest. Daidone stuffed a dead canary into Facciola's mouth and left his body in the trunk of his 1985 Mercury sedan and abandoned the car on East Fifty-Fifth Street in Canarsie.[116][115] In April 1991, Lastorino was ordered by Anthony Casso to murder Gambino family capo Bartholomew Boriello who was a former bodyguard of John Gotti. On April 13, 1991 Lastorino shot Boriello to death outside his Bensonhurst, Brooklyn home. The Boriello murder was allegedly performed with assistance of Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa.[117] In September 1991, during a Staten Island meeting, Vic Amuso and Anthony Casso replaced Alphonse D'Arco as acting boss and created a four-man ruling panel that consisted of Lastorino, Alphonse D'Arco, Anthony Baratta, and Salvatore Avellino.[118][119] On September 18, 1991, Lastorino along with capo Anthony Baratta and soldier Mike DeSantis conspired to kill Alphonse D'Arco in the Kimberly Hotel in Manhattan but failed, D'Arco defected on September 21, 1991 and became a government witness.[120][121]

FBI surveillance photograph of Lastorino, Baratta and Chiodo

In October 1991, Lastorino, along with Anthony Baratta, Salvatore Avellino, Richard Pagliarulo, Anthony Tortoerllo, George Conte, Thomas Anzellotto and Frank Papagni inducted (made) Thomas D'Ambrosia, Joseph Tortorello Jr., Frank Gioia Jr., Gregory Cappello and Jody Calabrese into the crime family during a ceremony that was held in a Howard Beach, Queens home.[20][11][122] Some time after, Lastorino was appointed consigliere in the family.[123] It was later revealed by government informant Frank Gioia Jr. that Lastorino was ordered by Anthony Casso to murder Patrick Testa on December 2, 1992 with intentions of blaming the Gambino family in a plot to kill John A. Gotti.[124] In April 1993,[11] Lastorino was indicted and jailed along with Michael DeSantis and Richard Pagliarulo on murder conspiracy, extortion and other racketeering charges.[125] During the May 16, 1994 trail the prosecution planned to use government witness's and former Lucchese mobsters Alphonse D'Arco, Peter Chiodo, and associate Corrado Marino for the case against Lastorino.[125] In June 1995, Lastorino took a plea deal and was sentenced to 18 years in prison.[126] Lastorino was released from prison on December 23, 2008 after serving 14 years in prison on conspiracy to commit murder, racketeering and several other murders, including the murder of painters union official James Bishop.[127][128] On June 22, 2011, his son Carl Lastorino attempted to kill Peter Argentina shooting him in the hand and shoulder at a Brooklyn tire shop, while Carl tried to make an escaped he was shot to death by the police in an attempted suicide-by-cop death.[129]

Joseph Lubrano[edit]

Joseph Lubrano

Joseph Lubrano (born October 26, 1970 New York), also known as "Giovanni", "John", "Big Joe" is a caporegime in the family with ties to mobsters on Arthur Avenue in The Bronx.[130] His crew is operating around the Bronx, Manhattan, Staten Island and Westchester. In 1996, Lubrano was wrongfully sent to prison for beating a black police officer in 1994 and was released two years later.[131] During the trial, it was alleged that Lubrano was a member of the Lucchese recruitment gang, The Tanglewood Boys.[131] In 1997, Darin Mazzarella, a member of the Tanglewood Boys became a federally protected witness. Mazzarella gave information to investigators and prosecutors about the Lubrano assault; he admitted participating in the assault with Alfred "Freddy Boy" Santorelli, the son of Anthony Santorelli, and asserted that Lubrano was not a Tanglewood member.[131]

In May 2010, Lubrano was listed on wanted poster by the FBI for armed robbery and racketeering.[132] On September 11, 2010, Lubrano was captured in Yonkers, New York.[133] He was later convicted and sentenced to 57 months in federal prison.[134] Lubrano was released from prison on October 31, 2014.[135]

Vincent Mancione[edit]

Vincent "Vinny Casablanca" Mancione is a soldier and former acting capo. In 2002, Mancione was indicted along with consigliere Joseph Caridi, capo John Cerrella and soldier Carmelo Profeta for extorting the Hudson & McCoy Fish House restaurant in Freeport, Long Island.[47] Mancione was released from prison on August 2, 2006.[136]

Frank Papagni[edit]

Frank "Frankie Bones" Papagni (born July 18, 1957) is a soldier.[11] In 1991, Papagni attended a making ceremony in Howard Beach, Queens.[20] He served as consigliere in the late 1990s.[137] In 1993, Papagni along with George Zappola and Frank Gioia Jr. plotted to have Steven Crea killed.[138] In 1996, Papagni was indicted along with George Zappola, George Conte and Frank Giacobbe on murder charges.[139] He was charged with two 1992 murders: the first was the murder of Gambino crime family associate Frank Mariconda and the second was the murder of Richard Taglianetti.[139] Papagni was released from prison on November 24, 2015.[140]

John Perna[edit]

John G. Perna (born 1977) is a soldier and son of Ralph V. Perna.[141] His brother's Joseph and Ralph M. are members of the New Jersey faction. On April 13, 2006, Perna was released from prison.[142] In November 2007, John and his brother Joseph were made into the Lucchese family.[141] On December 18, 2007, Perna along with his father Ralph V., his brothers Joseph and Ralph M., and other members and associates of the New Jersey faction were arrested on gambling, money laundering and racketeering charges.[143] On May 14, 2010, Perna was indicted along with thirty three other members and associates of the New Jersey faction on the 2007 charges of gambling, money laundering and racketeering.[144] In January 2016, John along with his brother Joseph each received 10 year sentences, while his father Ralph V. received an eight-year state prison sentence for pleading guilty to running a multibillion-dollar gambling enterprise, and his brother Ralph M. had charges still pending.[145]

Joseph M. Perna[edit]

Joseph M. "Little Joe" Perna (born 1969) is a soldier and son of Ralph V. Perna.[141] His brothers John and Ralph M. are members of the New Jersey faction. On May 18, 2006, Perna was released from prison.[146] In November 2007, Joseph Perna and his brother John were made into the Lucchese family by Joseph DiNapoli and Matthew Madonna and other members of the family's hierarchy.[141] On December 18, 2007, Perna along with his father Ralph V., his brothers John and Ralph M., his wife Roseanna and other members and associates of the New Jersey faction were arrested on gambling, money laundering and racketeering charges.[143] On May 14, 2010, Perna was indicted along with thirty three other members and associates of the New Jersey faction on the 2007 charges of gambling, money laundering and racketeering.[144] The indictment revealed that Perna and Michael Cetta financed a scheme to smuggle drugs and cell phones into East Jersey State Prison with members of the Nine Trey Gangsters (a set of the Bloods) and corrupt corrections officer.[144] In January 2016, Joseph and his brother John Perna each received 10 year sentences, while his father Ralph V. Perna received an eight-year state prison sentence for pleading guilty to running a multibillion-dollar gambling enterprise, and his brother Ralph M. had charges still pending.[145]

Michael Perna[edit]

Michael J. Perna is a soldier in the New Jersey faction. Perna's father Joseph Perna was a mob bookmaker and shylock during the 1960s operating from Newark, New Jersey.[141] His brother Ralph V. Perna is also a member in the New Jersey faction. During the 1980s, Perna was a member of Michael Taccetta's inner circle and controlled operations from the Hole in the Wall, a luncheonette in Newark's Down Neck section.[147] In August 1988, Perna was acquitted in the 21-month trial along with the other twenty members of the New Jersey faction.[148] On April 18, 1991, Perna was charged in two separate indictments.[149] The first indictment charged Perna along with Michael Taccetta, Martin Taccetta, Anthony Accetturo and Tommy Ricciardi with racketeering.[149] The second indictment charged Perna along with Michael Taccetta, Anthony Accetturo and Tommy Ricciardi with corrpution.[149] On August 13, 1993, Perna convicted in the first trial.[149] During the second trial both Thomas Ricciardi and Anthony Accetturo agreed to become Government witnesses they testified against Perna and Taccetta.[149] On September 20, 1993, Perna and Michael Taccetta pleaded guilty to federal racketeering.[149] In the plea deal both Perna and Michael Taccetta admitted they bribed or tried to bribe jurors in the 1988, trial against 20 members of the Lucchese family and the 1991 trial of John Riggi the boss of the DeCavalcante crime family.[150] Perna and Michael Taccetta were sentenced to twenty five years each.[149] He was released from prison on July 31, 2015.[151]

Ralph V. Perna[edit]

Ralph Vito Perna (born 1946) is a capo and head of the New Jersey faction. Perna's father Joseph Perna was a mob bookmaker and shylock during the 1960s operating from Newark, New Jersey.[141][152] His brother Michael J. Perna is a member of the New Jersey faction. Perna's three sons Joseph, John and Ralph M. are members of the New Jersey faction.[141] On August 18, 2006, Perna was released from prison.[153] On December 18, 2007, Perna along with Joseph DiNapoli, Matthew Madonna, Martin Taccetta, his three sons Joseph, John, Ralph M. and twenty five other members and associates of the New Jersey faction were arrested on gambling, money laundering and racketeering charges.[143] The arrests resulted from the investigation "Operation Heat", which alleged that the New Jersey faction ran an illegal gambling operation that earned approximately $2.2 billion over a 15-month period and smuggled drugs and pre-paid cell phones into a New Jersey prison.[154][155] On May 14, 2010, Perna was indicted along with DiNapoli, Madonna and twenty nine other members and associates of the New Jersey faction on the 2007 charges of gambling, money laundering and racketeering.[156] According to the indictment Perna "allegedly became top capo of the New Jersey faction of the family when Nicky Scarfo Jr. was deposed in 2007".[144] In 2012, New Jersey state began investigating the possibility of money laundering for legal costs in Perna's case.[157] In January 2016, Ralph V. received an eight-year state prison sentence for pleading guilty to running a multibillion-dollar gambling enterprise, while two of his sons John and Joseph each received 10 year sentences his third son Ralph M. had charges still pending.[145]

Carlo Profeta[edit]

Carlo Profeta is a soldier and former acting capo in Domenico Cutaia's crew. He once served as a bodyguard to Gambino family mobster Roy DeMeo.[158] In early 2009, Profeta had a sitdown with Bonanno family capo Anthony Mannone about a Lucchese soldier who owed him $200,000 in a loanshark debt.[158] On February 24, 2010, Profeta was indicted along with capo Domenico Cutaia, soldier Salvatore Cutaia, associates Joseph Cutaia, Eric Maione and Nicholas Bernardo, Bonanno family capo Anthony Mannone and associate Jerome Carameilli on racketeering and extortion charges.[83] In February 2011, Profeta and associate Eric Maione pleaded guilty to extortion charges.[159] On July 23, 2013, Profeta was released from prison.[160]

Anthony Santorelli[edit]

Anthony "Blue Eyes" Santorelli is a soldier operating in Westchester and the Bronx. In the 1990s, Santorelli led The Tanglewood Boys, a recruitment gang for the Lucchese family.[161] His son Alfred "Freddy Boy" Santorelli was a member of the gang.[162] In 1994, Santorelli was observed by an FBI agent, dumping something into a garbage can, which turned out to be clothes covered in blood.[161] A DNA check on the blood led to members of the gang being arrested for murdering college student Louis Balancio at a Yonkers sports bar.[161] In December 2003, his older brother Leonard Santorelli, the owner of CMS, a company that prints and distribute bank reports and documents was under investigation by law enforcement agency's in London and New York for allegedly bribing merchant banks to win contracts and his ties to his brother Anthony Santorelli.[163][164]

Carlo Taccetta[edit]

Carlo Taccetta (born 1973) is a soldier and son of Michael Taccetta a leader in the family's New Jersey faction. In 2004, the New Jersey Commission of Investigation stated that Carlo Taccetta began to take over after his father was imprisoned but New York leaders did not recognize his role.[44] He was imprisoned on weapons charge and released on November 29, 2004.[165] On January 26, 2014, Taccetta was arrested with 65 pounds of marijuana.[166] He was charged with possession and possession with intent to distribute marijuana.[166]

Joseph Tangorra[edit]

Joseph "Joey Flowers" Tangorra (born August 2, 1949) is a soldier, and former capo of the "Bensonhurst Crew". In September 2000, Tangorra was indicted along with acting boss Steven Crea, capo Dominic Truscello and othes members of the Lucchese Construction Group on labor racketeering charges.[100] In November 2000, Tangorra was indicted along with soldier Joseph Truncale and was charged with the 1988 murder of Victor Filocamo.[167] In June 2001, his wife Carol Ann Tangorra wrote a letter on behalf of her husband who had been denied bail.[168] Tangorra was released from prison December 9, 2014.[169]

Dominic Truscello[edit]

Dominic "Crazy Dom" Truscello (born April 29, 1934) is the capo of the "Prince Street Crew".[170] In the 1990s, Truscello along with Steven Crea and Joseph Tangorra formed the "Lucchese Construction Group", supervising all the Lucchese family's construction related rackets.[100] On September 6, 2000, Truscello was indicted along with acting boss Steven Crea, capo Joseph Tangorra, soldiers Joseph Datello, Philip DeSimone, Arthur Zambardi, Anthony Pezzullo, and Joseph Truncale on labor racketeering, extortion, and bid-rigging charges.[100] In September 2002, Truscello and Steven Crea were indicted on information supplied by Joseph Defede, who became a government witness in February.[171] The indictment charged Truscello with extorting "Commercial Brick", a construction company.[171] In October 2003, Truscello pleaded guilty to federal extortion charges.[172] On January 9, 2006, Truscello was released from prison.[173] On May 31, 2017, Truscello along with Street Boss Matthew Madonna, Underboss Steven Crea Sr., Consigliere Joseph DiNapoli and other members of the family were indicted and charged with racketeering, murder, narcotics (cocaine, heroin, marijuana, prescribed medication), and firearms offenses.[67][68]

Rocco Vitulli[edit]

Rocco Vitulli is a soldier. On August 10, 1989, Vitulli along with Frank Federico murdered Robert M. Kubecka and Donald Barstow, two executives of a trash-collection company in East Northport, New York.[174] In 1995, Vitulli was indicted along with Salvatore Avellino, Carmine Avellino, Anthony Baratta and Frank Federico for the murders of Robert Kubecka and Donald Barstow.[5] Vitulli was released from prison on September 7, 2000.[175]

George Zappola[edit]

George "Georgie Neck" Zappola (born 1960) is a former capo, and close ally to Anthony Casso.[176] In the late 1980s, Zappola and Alfonse D'Arco murdered Lucchese capo Michael Pappadio after he refused to give up control of his garment district rackets.[177] After surprising Pappadio in a bagel shop, Zappola shot him in the head with a .22-caliber pistol.[177] On May 17, 1990, Zappola and George Conte murdered James Bishop, the former secretary-treasurer of painters union Local 37, who had begun cooperating with the district attorney's office.[178] In 1993, Zappola along with Frank Papagni and Frank Gioia Jr. plotted to have Steven Crea killed.[138] In 1996, Zappola was indicted along with Frank Papagni, George Conte and Frank Giacobbe on murder charges.[139] In June 1996, Zappola pleaded guilty to several murders, including the 1990 Bishop slaying.[179] In October 1996, while being held at Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, Zappola bribed a federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) guard $1,000 to smuggle his sperm out of the facility.[180] Zappola was released from prison on March 3, 2014.[181]

Imprisoned members[edit]

Ray Argentina[edit]

Ray Argentina is a soldier and older brother to Peter Argentina a made member in the family. In 1992, Argentina along with Louis Daidone, Alan Taglianetti and Robert Molinelli were found guilty in the $1.2 million robbery of an armored truck in Brooklyn in 1988.[182] In 2001, Argentina was indicted along with Louis Gampero and Ken Cardona they were charged with illegal mortgage fraud activities in Brooklyn, upstate New York and Long Island, and running an illegal cocaine ring in Long Island.[183] Argentina is currently incarcerated with a projected release date of October 4, 2024.[184]

Louis Daidone[edit]

Louis "Louie Bagels" Daidone (born February 23, 1946), also known as "Louie Cross Bay", is a made man who once served as Acting Capo, then Consigliere and finally became Acting Boss in the Lucchese family.[185] Daidone was born and raised in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn.[186] Daidone played as a quarter-back for New Utrecht High School and was even offered a football scholarship to Indiana State University in 1963, instead Daidone stayed in Bensonhurst.[187] Daidone's nickname "Louie Bagel" came from the fact that he owned part of a Howard Beach bagel shop "Bagels by the Bay" on Cross Bay Boulevard where he controlled most of his illegal rackets, he also ran a car service and was heavily active in hijacking cigarettes and tires.[188][189] He became an associate of the Canarsie crew under Capo Paul Vario.[190] On August 23, 1982, Daidone, Alphonse D'Arco and four other men were made into the Lucchese family, the ceremony was conducted by Boss Anthony Corallo, Underboss Salvatore Santoro, Capo Paul Vario, and members Frank Manzo, Peter DiPalermo, Charles DiPalermo and Salvatore DeSimone.[186][190]

In late 1988, Lucchese boss Vic Amuso ordered Daidone to murder Lucchese associate Thomas "Red" Gilmore after becoming suspicious of him being an informant.[185] Gilmore ran a chop shop, operated a limousine service and was involved in loansharking operations. On February 5, 1989, Daidone along with Patty Dellorusso and another associate waited for Gilmore near his apartment in Richmond Hills, Queens when they ambushed him and shot him three times in the head and neck.[191][185][192]

In August 1990, Anthony Casso gave Frank Lastorino the contract to murder mobster Bruno Facciola after Casso had received information from two NYPD police detectives Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa on his payroll that Facciola was an informant.[115] On August 24, 1990, Frank Lastorino, Louie Daidone and Richard Pagliarulo murdered Bruno Facciola.[116] Lastorino arranged to bring Facciola to a Brooklyn garage, inside the garage Lastorino stabbed Facciola and Pagliarulo shot him six times in the face and chest. Daidone stuffed a dead canary into Facciola's mouth and left his body in the trunk of his 1985 Mercury sedan and abandoned the car on East Fifty-Fifth Street in Canarsie.[116][115] In early 1991, Daidone was promoted to acting capo of the Canarsie crew when Alponose D'Arco was promoted to acting boss.[193]

On May 1, 1992, Daidone and Robert Molinelli, Raymond Argentina and Alan Taglianetti were convicted of conspiring to rob the Rapid Armored Truck Co. vehicle on March 25, 1988.[194] Daidone was sentenced to five years in prison. The stolen $1.2 million was never recovered.[195] Daidone was paroled in 1996, under orders preventing him from speaking to known criminals for three years, he almost violated his parole when he allegedly contacted Lucchese mobster Raymond Argentina.[189] He was promoted to consigliere during this time.[185]

In 2000, after Steven Crea was indicted on corruption charges, Daidone was promoted to Acting boss of the family.[189] On November 15, 2002, Daidone was charged along with Consigliere Joseph Caridi and twelve others on racketeering and extortion charges of Long Island a strip club Sinderella among other business.[196] In December 2002, Daidone was indicted along with Consigliere Joseph Caridi, acting capo John "Johnny Sideburns" Cerrella, soldier Vincent "Vinny Baldy" Salanardi and twenty others on racketeering and extortion charges of a Long Island business.[197] In March 2003, Daidone was indicted again for racketeering, loan-sharking, gambling and conspiracy to commit murder the 1989 Gilmore murder and the 1990 Facciolo murder among other crimes.[198] Former Lucchese family acting boss Al D'Arco testified against Daidone during his trial.[199] In 2004, Daidone's daughter Lori's fiancé John Micali a Gambino family associate pleaded guilty to bank burglary charges in Brooklyn federal court and agreed to serve up to six years behind bars.[200] On June 30, 2004, Daidone was sentenced to life in prison, after being convicted of loansharking charges and the conspiracy to murder in Gilmore and Facciolo.[201][185] As of May 2018, Daidone is incarcerated at the high-security United States Penitentiary (USP) in Allenwood, Pennsylvania.[202]

Joseph Massaro[edit]

Joseph "Joey Bang Bang" Massaro is a soldier. He was a member of the "Harlem Crew" and reported to capo Anthony Baratta.[203] During the early 1980s, Massaro extorted Long Island topless bars starting a feud with the Bonanno crime family. In 1990, Massaro and Patrick Esposito murdered Joseph Fiorito.[204] In 1993, Massaro was found guilty of extortion and arson to take over Long Island topless bars.[203] At his trial FBI agent Joe Pistone discussed what he learned about a 1980 Bonanno-Lucchese family sit-down over the topless bars in Long Island.[203] Former Lucchese family acting boss Alphonse D'Arco also testified against him.[204] Massaro is currently serving life in USP Lewisburg Prison. (Register Number: 83413-020)[205]

Associate(s)[edit]

Joseph Cutaia[edit]

Joseph Cutaia is an associate. His father Salvatore is a soldier and his grandfather Domenico is a capo in the Lucchese family. On December 24, 2009, Cutaia and Nicholas Bernardo were charged with attempted robbery and stick up of a Bensonhurst, Brooklyn couple.[206] In February 2010, Cutaia was indicted along with his grandfather capo Domenico Cutaia, his father soldier Salvatore Cutaia, soldier Carlo Profeta, associates Eric Maione and Nicholas Bernardo, Bonanno family capo Anthony Mannone and associate Jerome Carameilli on racketeering and extortion charges.[83] He is currently in prison with a projected release date of May 31, 2027.[207]

Ralph M. Perna[edit]

Ralph M. Perna (born 1972) is an associate and son of Ralph V. Perna.[141] His brother's Joseph and John are members of the New Jersey faction. On December 18, 2007, Perna along with his father Ralph V., his brothers Joseph and John, and other members and associates of the New Jersey faction were arrested on gambling, money laundering and racketeering charges.[143] On May 14, 2010, Perna was indicted along with thirty three other members and associates of the New Jersey faction on the 2007 charges of gambling, money laundering and racketeering.[144] In January 2016, his father Ralph V. received an eight-year state prison sentence for pleading guilty to running a multibillion-dollar gambling enterprise, and his brothers Joseph and John each received 10 year sentences, while he had charges still pending against him.[145]

Past members[edit]

Joseph Abate[edit]

Joseph F. Abate (1902-1994), also known as "Joe", was a capo in the family's New Jersey faction.[208] In the 1920s, Abate served as an enforcer for Al Capone in Chicago before settling in New Jersey.[209] In June 1976, Abate attended Anthony Accetturo induction ceremony into the Lucchese family.[209] In 1979, Abate went into semiretirement and Accetturo succeed him as boss of the New Jersey faction.[210] He moved to Margate, New Jersey and served as a liaison between families in New Jersey until 1989 when he retired from Mafia affairs.[211] In 1992, his daughter Catherine Abate was appointed New York City's new Correction Commissioner.[212] She was confronted about her father's past and denied that he was ever involved in organized crime.[213] In 1994, Joseph Abate died of natural causes.[214] In 1998, his daughter Catherine admitted that she could no longer dismiss allegations that father belonged to the Lucchese crime family.[214]

Settimo Accardi[edit]

Settimo "Big Sam" Accardi (October 23, 1902 in Vita, Sicily-December 3, 1977) he served as capo in the family's New Jersey faction up until his deportation.[215] and was one of the largest heroin traffickers during the 1950s. Accardi emigrated to the U.S. shortly before World War I and associated with mobsters Joseph Sica, Willie Moretti, Joe Adonis and Abner Zwillman. During World War II, Accardi sold counterfeit food ration cards.[216] On January 22, 1945, he became a naturalized US. citizen until July 10, 1953 when his naturalization was revoked because he had not disclosed two previous arrests during his naturalization hearing.[217]

In 1955, Accardi was arrested on a federal narcotics charge in Newark, New Jersey. After posting a $92,000 bond, Accardi skipped bail and fled to Turin, Italy, where he continued smuggling heroin into the US and Canada.[218] Accardi later moved to Toronto, Canada, to oversee this operation. In 1960, U.S. authorities finally located Accardi in Turin, Italy and on November 28, 1963, after a long legal fight, Accardi was extradited back to New York.[218] On July 21, 1964, Accardi was convicted on narcotics conspiracy and skipping bail. On August 24, he was sentenced to fifteen years of imprisonment and a $16,000 fine.[219] He died on December 3, 1977.

Alfonso Cataldo[edit]

Alfonso T. "Tic" Cataldo (died August 21, 2013) was a soldier in the New Jersey faction. Cataldo grew up in Newark, New Jersey with his cousins Michael and Martin Taccetta.[220] From 1986 to 1988, Cataldo was one of the twenty defendants in the 21-month-long trial of Lucchese crime family's New Jersey faction.[41] During the trial Cataldo was listed as a member supervising numbers and loansharking operations in New Jersey.[41] In 2002, Cataldo was indicted on illegal gambling and for the October 7, 1981 murder of William Kennedy.[221] In 2004, the New Jersey Commission of Investigation stated that Cataldo was running illegal gambling operations in New Jersey.[44] In December 2007, Cataldo was indicted along with capos Joseph DiNapoli, Matthew Madonna and Ralph V. Perna and others on gambling, money laundering and racketeering charges.[222] On August 21, 2013, Cataldo died of natural causes.[223]

Ralph Cuomo[edit]

Ralph "Raffie" Cuomo (died 2008), also known as "Raffaele", was a soldier who owned Ray's Pizza on Prince Street between Elizabeth and Mott Streets in Little Italy.[224] In 1959, Cuomo opened the first "Rays Pizza", he later opened another in the Upper East Side.[225] In 1969, he was convicted of drug trafficking after being found with 50 pounds of heroin.[226] In 1998, Cuomo was sentenced to four years in prison for making heroin sales in the pizzeria.[224] He was released from prison on May 24, 2002.[227] Cuomo died in 2008 and his "Ray's Pizza" on Prince Street closed over a rent dispute in October 2011.[228]

Paul Correale[edit]

Paul "Paulie Ham" Correale (April 25, 1911 - died) was a capo in the family. Correale controlled gambling and narcotics in East Harlem.[229] In December 1930, Correale and Carmine Tramunti had charges of robbery dropped and they were released from jail.[230] Correale ran a Lucchese family gambling club between Secound Avenue and East 112th Street in East Harlem. In 1952, Joseph Valachi and others murdered Eugenio Giannini near Correale's club.[231]

Anthony Delasco[edit]

Anthony "Ham" Delasco (sometimes spelled Dolasco) was a former boxer and capo in New Jersey.[210] In the 1950s, he took over the Jersey crew after Settimo Accardi was deported.[215] Delasco ran his crew from East Orange, New Jersey where he controlled jukebox machines, cigarette vending machines,[232] illegal gambling and loan-sharking operation in Newark, New Jersey.[210] In the late 1950s, Delasco took Anthony Accetturo as his protege.[210] Delasco died in the late 1960s, his rackets were taken over by Accetturo.[233]

Anthony DiLapi[edit]

Anthony DiLapi (February 9, 1936 – February 4, 1990), also known as "Blue Eyes over the Bridges" or "Fat Anthony", was a soldier. His uncle, Salvatore Santoro, was a former underboss in the Lucchese family.[234] DiLapi controlled the Lucchese family's Teamsters union in New York City's Garment District and a bookmaking business, and owned part of a vending machine company in Brooklyn.[234] He also worked with Thomas Gambino, the son of Carlo Gambino and son-in-law of Tommy Lucchese, in extorting businesses in the Garment District. After being released from prison, DiLapi was summoned to a meeting with Anthony Casso, and fled.[234] Casso ordered Burton Kaplan to use two NYPD detectives on his payroll, Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa, to track down DiLapi.[234] The two detectives found him in Reseda, California. Vic Amuso and Anthony Casso then ordered Joseph "Little Joe" D'Arco to kill DiLapi.[234] On February 4, 1990, D'Arco shot DiLapi to death in his Hollywood, California, apartment building's underground garage.[234] DiLapi was shot five times in the face and four times in the body.[235] On April 6, 2006, Eppolito and Caracappa were convicted of murder for their role in eight mob killings, including that of Anthony DiLapi.[236]

Stefano LaSalle[edit]

Stefano "Steve" LaSalle (real name LaSala[237]) was an early member of the Morello family; he later joined Reina's family.[238] In 1915, East Harlem's Italian lottery "king" Giosue Gallucci was murdered, allowing LaSalle and Tommaso Lomonte to take over the lottery games.[238] LaSalle served as underboss to Tom Lucchese and later Carmine Tramunti, until he retired in the 1970s.

Anthony Loria Sr.[edit]

Anthony "Tony" Loria Sr., also known as "Tony Aboudamita", was a mobster who played a major role in the French Connection heroin scandal. In October 1973, Loria was indicted along with the boss of the Lucchese Family Carmine Tramunti and 42 other mobsters on drug dealing charges.[239] Loria was known to federal agents and the BNDD as a major drug trafficker within the Lucchese Crime Family. He was implicated along with his longtime partner Vincent Papa, Anthony Passero, Virgil Alessi and Frank D'Amato in the New York Police Department scandal which over $70 million worth of drugs seized during the French Connection operation was stolen from the police property room. The crew stole 398 pounds of heroin and 120 pounds of cocaine from 1969 to 1972.[240] Loria was convicted in 1961 trafficking heroin but was overturned on appeal 1968 for a violation of the Fourth Amendment. The case People v. Loria is still cited today in case law. Loria, along with Papa and his crew are known as "The Men who Stole The French Connection" In 1989, he died from natural causes.

Joseph Lucchese[edit]

Joseph "Joe Brown" Lucchese was a capo and brother to Tommy Lucchese the boss of the Lucchese crime family. He controlled gambling operation along with Aniello Migliore.[241] In 1963, during the Valachi hearings Lucchese was identified as a capo in the Lucchese family. He died during the early 1970s.[242]

Anthony Luongo[edit]

Anthony "Buddy" Luongo was a former capo. In 1986, Luongo tried to take over the Lucchese crime family after boss Anthony Corallo was imprisoned during the Commission case.[243] In December 1986, Luongo met Vic Amuso, Anthony Casso, Bobby Amuso and Dom Carbucci in Brooklyn when Bobby Amuso shot Luongo dead.[244]

Mariano Macaluso[edit]

Mariano "Mac" Macaluso was a former member. He served as consigliere during the 1960s.[245] In 1986, after the Mafia Commission Trial, Macaluso became the new underboss.[246] In 1989, boss Vic Amuso forced him into retirement.[247] In 1992, he died from natural causes.

Frank Manzo[edit]

Frank Manzo in an FBI surveillance photograph

Frank Manzo (February 2, 1925 – October 23, 2012), also known as "Francesco Manzo", "Frank Manse", and "Frankie the Wop", was a soldier in the Vario Crew who oversaw the family's interests at John F. Kennedy International Airport ("JFK") in Queens, New York.[248] He served as a union delegate in the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, controlled Local 295 and owned two trucking companies: LVF Air Cargo, Inc., and LVF Airport Service Inc. at JFK Airport.[249] Manzo also owned Villa Capra, a restaurant in Cedarhurst, New York, where he conducted illegal activities.[250]

In 1972, Manzo was kidnapped by James McBratney, Eddie Maloney, Tommy Genovese, and Richie Chaisson; they held him on $150,000 in ransom, which was paid, and he was released.[251] In 1983, Manzo was overheard in an FBI wiretap, saying, "We rule this airport".[252][253] In 1985, Manzo along with Local 295 President Frank Calise, Local 851 Vice-President Harry Davidoff and others were indicted on charges of extorting shipping and trucking companies at JFK Airport.[254] In 1986, Manzo pleaded guilty to racketeering[255] and was sentenced to twelve years in prison and fined $325,000. On April 8, 1987, Manzo was banned from New Jersey casinos due to his history of involvement with organized crime.[256]

Manzo was released from prison in 1994.[257] In 1995, Manzo was charged with racketeering for extorting $2 million in payoffs from cement company owner John Quadrozzi over a 13-year period, between 1978 and 1991.[258] However, the charges were dropped when the judge ruled that the crimes were covered under his 1986 plea agreement. On October 23, 2012, Manzo died in his sleep.[258]

Richard Pagliarulo[edit]

Richard "Toupe" Pagliarulo (November 30, 1948 – 1999) was a former capo. Pagliarulo took over as capo of Peter Chiodo's old Bensonhurst crew. In 1991, Pagliarulo served as a member of a panel that conducted a Lucchese crime family induction ceremony in Howard Beach, Queens.[20] He sponsored both Gregory "Whitey" Cappello and Jody Calabrese for membership during the ceremony.[11] In the late 1990s, Pagliarulo died of natural causes in prison.

Vincent Papa[edit]

Vincent C. Papa (1917 - July 1977), became notorious for masterminding the theft of the French Connection heroin from the New York Police Department (NYPD) property office.[259] Papa grew up in Astoria, Queens and owned a tire-company in the neighborhood.[260] He had been arrested 28 times, two of the arrests were on drug charges.[260] Papa ran his criminal operations from Ditmars Car Service, in Astoria, Queens, and from the Astoria Colts Social Club.[261] He worked closely with mobsters Anthony Loria and Virgil Alessi.[261]

Between 1969 and 1972, New York Police Department detectives James Farley, Joseph Nunziata, Frank King and other were paid by Papa to steal approximately $70 million in confiscated narcotics (heroin) from the New York City Police Property Clerk's office in Lower Manhattan.[259] Papa was arrested on February 3, 1972, in a car parked on Bronxdale Avenue with Joseph DiNapoli in the back seat there was a suitcase with $967,500 in hundred dollar bills.[260] In 1975, Papa was convicted and sent to the Atlanta Federal Prison in Atlanta, Georgia.[261] In 1977, Papa was stabbed to death in prison.[259] He is buried in St. John's Cemetery in Queens. Papa's infamous theft became famous after the movie The French Connection II.

Joseph Pinzolo[edit]

Bonaventura "Joseph" Pinzolo (1887 – September 5, 1930), also known as "Fat Joe", was the boss of the family during 1930. In July 1908, Pinzolo was arrested for trying to bomb 314 East 11th Street in an effort to force owner Francisco Spinelli to pay Black Hand extortion demands.[262] After his arrest Pinzolo, gave up his boss Giuseppe Costabile, a Camorrista who controlled the area south of Houston Street to Canal Street and from East Broadway to the East River.[262] Pinzolo served 2 years and 8 months to 5 years after refusing to testify against Costabile.[262]

In February 1930, Gaetano Reina was murdered and boss Joseph Masseria backed Pinzolo to take control of the Reina family. Pinzolo may have been responsible for Reina's murder, though the most widely suspected culprit for that crime remains Vito Genovese.[263] As boss Pinzolo was unfamiliar with the members of the family and the East Harlem area.[264] His promotion angered Tommaso Gagliano, Tommy Lucchese and Dominick Petrilli who formed a splinter group within the family and planned his murder.[265] On September 5, 1930, Pinzolo's body was found in the Brokaw building on 1487 Broadway in suite 1007 occupied by California Dry Fruit Importers.[265] The office was leased by Tommy Lucchese four months earlier.[266] According to Joseph Valachi the killer was Girolomo Santuccio.[265] Valachi also mentioned that after Pinzolo's assassination a meeting was held on Staten Island to uncover who was responsible for the murder.[266]

Vincenzo Rao[edit]

Vincenzo John Rao (June 21, 1898 Palermo, Sicily – September 25, 1988),[267] also known as Vincent or Vinny, was a former Consigliere in the family. His father was Antonio Rao and his mother Liboria Gagliano.[268] He had a brother Calogero "Charles" and a sister Maria Speciale.[269] On his mother's side, Rao was a distant relative to Tommaso Gagliano. He was a cousin to gangster Joseph Rao.[270] He married Carmelina Alberti and the couple had two daughters, Nina Vento and Liboria Pancaldo.[267] On December 5, 1921, Vincenzo Rao became a naturalized United States citizen in New York City.[267] He began his criminal career working for the Gagliano's in East Harlem.[268] Rao became a powerful mobster in lathing industry.[268] He became partners in Five Boro Hoisting Company, United Lathing Company, Westchester Lathing Corporation and Ace Lathing Company operating from the Bronx and Westchester.[268] In the 1950s, boss Gaetano Lucchese promoted Rao to Consigliere in the family.

In 1957, Rao was arrested with 60 other mobsters at the abortive Apalachin meeting in rural Apalachin, New York.[271] When asked by investigators why he was at the meeting, Rao said he went there for the luncheon buffet and did not speak to anyone else because he was not "introduced".[272] During the 1963 Valachi hearings, Rao was listed as the Lucchese family's consigliere. In 1965, Rao was convicted on perjury charges and was sentenced to five years in prison.[273] At the same time the longtime boss Tom Lucchese had become ill and Rao was thought as suitable successor. His chance to become the new boss never happened due to his trials.[274] During the early 1970s, Rao retired. On September 25, 1988, Rao died of natural causes and is buried at Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York.

Patrick Testa[edit]

Patrick "Patty" Testa is a former soldier.[1] Testa was the younger brother to Joseph Testa. In 1984, he was indicted on fraud and theft charges along with members of the Gambino family's DeMeo crew.[275] Testa was sentenced to two years in prison and after his release joined the Lucchese crime family. On December 2, 1992, Testa was murdered, shot in the back of the head nine times.[276] It was later revealed that Anthony Casso had ordered Frank Lastorino to murder Testa.[277]

Past associate(s)[edit]

Guido Penosi[edit]

Guido "the Bull" Penosi a former associate. He lived in Beverly Hills, and was a narcotics dealer active in Los Angeles and the West Coast.[278] In the 1980s, Penosi along with his cousin Frank Piccolo (a member in the Gambino crime family) stopped Genovese family mobsters from extorting his friend Wayne Newton (Wayne Newton v. NBC).[279][280]

Abraham Telvi[edit]

NYPD mugshot of Abraham Telvi

Abraham "Abe" Telvi (September 12, 1934 – July 28, 1956) was an associate of Johnny Dio.[281] In 1956, Telvi was ordered by Dio to throw acid on New York journalist Victor Riesel for making radio and television appearances about labor union corruption.[282] In the morning of April 5, 1956, Telvi attacked Victor Riesel as he was leaving Lindy's, a Broadway restaurant, throwing sulfuric acid onto his face leaving him permanently blind.[282] In the attack, Telvi had burned himself badly on the right side of his face and neck with some of the acid that splashed on him. He was paid $1,175 in cash and began demanding more money from Dio.[281] On July 28, 1956, Telvi was found dead on Mulberry Street with a bullet in his head.[282]

Government informants and witnesses[edit]

Joseph D'Arco[edit]

Joseph "Little Joe" D'Arco is a former soldier who is currently in witness protection along with his father former acting boss Alphonse D'Arco. In early 1990, Vic Amuso and Anthony Casso ordered D'Arco to kill Anthony DiLapi, a soldier who was in hiding.[234] On February 4, 1990, he shot DiLapi to death in his Hollywood, California apartment buildings underground garage.[234] In September 1991, D'Arco's father became a marked man (being targeted for death), and, fearing for his own life, surrendered to the F.B.I. and agreed to become a witness.[283]

Donald Frankos[edit]

Donald "Tony the Greek" George Frankos, (born November 10, 1938 Hackensack, New Jersey – died March 30, 2011 Dannemora, New York), was a Greek-Italian contract killer and mob associate of the Lucchese family, who later became a government witness. His father George Argiri Frango was left his home town of Kardamyla on Chios, Greece in 1905 as a crewman on a ship.[284] George Frango married Irene, an immigrant from Syracuse, Italy and had three children: Georgia (1932), James (1935) and Donald (1938).[284] In 1974, Frankos murdered Lucchese associate Richard Bilello.[285]

In 1992, Frankos claimed to author William Hoffman he took part in the murder of Jimmy Hoffa, with a hit team consisting of himself, and Irish-American mobsters John Sullivan " Mad Dog " and James Coonan from Hell's Kitchen [286] According to Frankos, Hoffa was lured by his close friend Chuckie O'Brien to a house owned by Detroit mobster Anthony Giacolone. Once there, Hoffa was shot and killed by Coonan and Frankos using suppressed .22 pistols.[287] Hoffa was then dismembered by Coonan, Sullivan, and Frankos. It has been asserted that he sealed the body in an oil drum and buried it underneath Giants Stadium, however no evidence has ever been found to substantiate this claim.[288] Author Jerry Capeci found these claims false because Frankos was in prison during Hoffa's disappearance.[289]

Eugenio Giannini[edit]

Eugenio Giannini a former soldier who became an informant to the Bureau of Narcotics.[290] In 1942, Giannini was charged with heroin conspiracy and served fifteen months in prison.[290] He moved to Europe in 1950, and began smuggling U.S. medical supplies into Italy. While in Italy he formed a connection to Charles Luciano and began informing on Luciano to the Bureau of Narcotics.[290] Giannini was arrested on counterfeiting charges in Italy but the charges were dropped and he moved back to New York. The Mafia in New York discovered that Giannini was an informer and ordered his murder. Genovese family capo Anthony "Tony Bender" Strollo gave the contract to Joseph Valachi.[231] On September 20, 1952, Giannini's body was found on 107th Street shot to death.[231] Valachi later revealed he recruited brothers Joseph and Pasquale Pagano and Fiore Siano to carry out the hit. They murdered Giannini near a gambling club run by Lucchese family soldier Paul Correale between Second Avenue and East 112th Street.[231]

Frank Gioia Jr.[edit]

Frank "Spaghetti Man" Gioia Jr. (born August 10, 1967) is a former soldier who is currently in witness protection along with his father former soldier Frank Gioia Sr. In 1991, Gioia Jr. was inducted into the Lucchese crime family in a ceremony held in Howard Beach, Queens.[20] He was sponsored by George Conte, who was filling in for his real sponsor George Zappola.[11] In June 1992, Gioia Jr. was arrested in Brooklyn on a gun charge.[11] In 1993, Gioia Jr. along with George Zappola and Frank Papagni plotted to have Steven Crea killed.[138] In 1993, Gioia was arrested for trafficking heroin from Manhattan to Boston.[11] In 1994, Gioia found out that Frank Papagni planned to murder his father Frank Gioia Sr., prompting the son to become a government witness.[20] Since becoming a government witness, Gioia Jr. has testified against 60 defendants.[291]

According to investigator Robert Anglen, a Phoenix, Arizona real estate developer Frank Capri is really former mob informant Frank Gioia Jr. Since 2015, Capri and his company have been accused in multiple lawsuits from failing to pay rent, to stiffing contractors and walking off with money meant to pay for construction.[292]

Burton Kaplan[edit]

Burton Kaplan was an associate and government informant. During the 1980s Kaplan was the go-between guy for Lucchese crime family underboss Anthony Casso and NYPD Detectives Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa.[293] In 2006, Kaplan was released from federal custody and his remaining 18-year sentence for marijuana trafficking was dropped for cooperating in the case against Eppolito and Caracappa.[293] In July 2009, Kaplan died from prostate cancer.[294]

Dominick Petrilli[edit]

Dominick "The Gap" Petrilli was a former member. He got the nickname "The Gap" after losing two front teeth in a childhood fight. Petrilli met Joseph Valachi in Sing Sing prison in Ossining, New York.[295] In 1928, after Valachi was released from prison Petrilli introduced him to Girolama "Bobby Doyle" Santucci and Tom Gagliano.[295] In 1942, Petrilli was convicted on narcotic charges and was deported to Italy.[296] In November 1953, he reentered the U.S. and it was rumored he was working with the government.[296][297] On December 9, 1953, he was murdered in a bar on East 183rd Street in the Bronx by three gunmen.[296]

Thomas Ricciardi[edit]

Thomas "Tommy Boy" Ricciardi is a former soldier who is currently in witness protection. Both Thomas and his brother Daniel were associated with the Lucchese family's New Jersey faction before becoming government informants.[298] Ricciardi was a member of Michael Taccetta's inner circle and controlled the groups illegal gambling operations.[147] In August 1988, Ricciardi along with his brother Daniel and twenty other members of the New Jersey faction were acquitted in a 21-month trial.[148] On April 18, 1991, Ricciardi was indicted along with Michael Taccetta, Anthony Accetturo, Michael Perna on corrpution charges.[149] On August 13, 1993, they were all convicted of racketeering and both Thomas Ricciardi and Anthony Accetturo agreed to become government witnesses and testified against Taccetta and Perna.[149] On September 6, 2001, Ricciardi was released from prison after serving 10 years, and is now currently in the witness protection program.[299]

Vincent Salanardi[edit]

Vincent "Vinny Baldy" Salanardi is a former soldier who became a government informant. In 2002, Salanardi was indicted along with consigliere Joseph Caridi, capo John Cerrella and others.[49] The group was charged with extorting the Hudson & McCoy Fish House restaurant in Freeport, Long Island.[49] He began cooperating with the government, and continued to collect money from a loanshark debt and was dropped from the witness protection program.[300] In March 2006, Salanardi was sentenced to 11 years and three months in prison.[301] Salanardi was released from prison on October 29, 2012.[302]

Frank Suppa[edit]

Frank "Goo Goo" Suppa is a former soldier who is currently in witness protection. Suppa was soldier in the Lucchese family's New Jersey faction operating in Florida as Anthony Accetturo right-hand man.[303] In 1983, Suppa attended a sitdown along with Anthony Accetturo, Michael Taccetta, Thomas Ricciardi and Philadelphia crime family mobsters Jackie the nose DiNorscio and Joseph Alonzo over DiNorscio joining the Lucchese family.[304] In 1993, Suppa was indicted along with others on charges that they conspired to distribute up to 1,650 pounds of cocaine in the United States.[305] In December 1996, Suppa along with his son Anthony Suppa, Joseph Marino, David Deatherage and Steven Cassone testified against Fabio Dicristifaro and Irving Schwartz in the murder case of Joseph Martino.[306] In 1997, Dicristifaro and Schwartz received life sentences, on the testimony of Suppa and the other witnesses.[307]

Notes[edit]

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  14. ^ a b c Capeci, (Gang Land, 2003) "November 9, 1993 Really Long Wait for Sign from God" p.142-143
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References[edit]

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