Vingie E. Roe

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Vingie E. Roe, from a 1918 publication.

Vingie E. Lawton Roe (December 7, 1879 — August 13, 1958) was an American novelist and screenwriter.

Early life[edit]

Vingetta Elizabeth Roe (some sources give her middle name as "Eve") was born in Oxford, Kansas,[1] and raised in Oklahoma Territory,[2] the daughter of Maurice Pool Roe, a physician, and Clara Castanien Roe.[3] As a child she was kept from school to preserve her weak eyesight.[4] She briefly attended Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College in 1902.[5]

Career and filmography[edit]

Advertisement for Wild Honey (1918), crediting Vingie E. Roe as co-writer
An advertisement for North of the Rio Grande (1922), crediting Vingie E. Roe for the story

Roe wrote more than thirty novels, mostly Westerns "with a feminist twist",[6] and dozens of stories published between 1906 and 1930, in publications including Sunset, Munsey's, McCall's and Collier's.[7] Her stories were also serialized in newspapers.[8][9] Her first novel was The Maid of the Whispering Hills (1912),[10] which was praised as "a big novel by an author of great promise" in a San Francisco Call review.[11] "I stand for clean literature," she told an audience of writers in 1929. "I have never written a dirty sex story and I never will."[4]

Her stories were the bases[12] of eight silent films and one sound picture:

She was a member of the Berkeley Branch of the California Writers Club, of the Sacramento Branch of the League of American Penwomen, of the Author's League of America.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Vingie E. Roe married Raymond C. Lawton, an electrical engineer, in 1907. They lived in Oregon and owned an orchard. After they divorced, Vingie Roe lived with her mother at Lost Valley Ranch, in Napa County, California.[4] She hosted annual gatherings of women writers on her ranch.[21][22] She died in 1958, from heart problems, aged 78 years. Her papers are archived at Oklahoma State University.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Binheim, Max; Elvin, Charles A (1928). Women of the West; a series of biographical sketches of living eminent women in the eleven western states of the United States of America. p. 79. Retrieved 8 August 2017.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ Charles Robert Goins, Danney Goble, James H. Anderson, eds., Historical Atlas of Oklahoma (University of Oklahoma Press 2006): 232. ISBN 9780806134833
  3. ^ "Vingie E. Roe, by Herself" Sunset Monthly (March 1918): 21.
  4. ^ a b c "Vingie Roe, Successful Author, Gives Glimpses of her Writing Career" Press Democrat (June 16, 1929): 10. via Newspapers.comopen access publication – free to read
  5. ^ a b Vingie E. Roe Collection, Oklahoma State University.
  6. ^ Mary Jo Winter, "Forthright and Female: Vingie E. Roe" The Press Democrat (September 21, 2014).
  7. ^ Vingie E. Roe, Standard Index of Short Stories, 1900-1933.
  8. ^ Vingie E. Roe, "Nameless River" Nashua Reporter (July 29, 1925): 6. via Newspapers.comopen access publication – free to read
  9. ^ Vingie E. Roe, "Sidney of Red Mountain House" Winnipeg Tribune (November 14, 1919): 12. via Newspapers.comopen access publication – free to read
  10. ^ Vingie E. Roe, The Maid of the Whispering Hills (1912).
  11. ^ "The Maid of the Whispering Hills" San Francisco Call (February 25, 1912): 7. via Newspapers.comopen access publication – free to read
  12. ^ Alan Goble, The Complete Index to Literary Sources in Film (Walter de Gruyter 1999). ISBN 9783110951943
  13. ^ Vingie E. Roe, Heart of the Night Wind (Grosset & Dunlap 1913).
  14. ^ Larry Langman, A Guide to Silent Westerns (Greenwood Publishing 1992): 340. ISBN 9780313278587
  15. ^ "Wild Honey" Wichita Daily Eagle (May 17, 1919): 2. via Newspapers.comopen access publication – free to read
  16. ^ Larry Langman, A Guide to Silent Westerns (Greenwood Publishing 1992): 96. ISBN 9780313278587
  17. ^ Henryk Hoffmann, Western Film Highlights: The Best of the West, 1914-2001 (McFarland 2009): 11. ISBN 9781476608655
  18. ^ Larry Langman, A Guide to Silent Westerns (Greenwood Publishing 1992): 304-305. ISBN 9780313278587
  19. ^ Larry Langman, A Guide to Silent Westerns (Greenwood Publishing 1992): 424. ISBN 9780313278587
  20. ^ " "Vingie E. Roe Story Sold in England" Press Democrat (August 2, 1945): 10. via Newspapers.comopen access publication – free to read
  21. ^ "Writers to Honor Vingie E. Roe, Anna B. Mesquida" Press Democrat (June 19, 1935): 6. via Newspapers.comopen access publication – free to read
  22. ^ "Pen Women Enjoy Hospitality of Vingie Roe" Press Democrat (May 26, 1936): 8. via Newspapers.comopen access publication – free to read

External links[edit]