National Capital Area Council

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National Capital Area Council
Council logo
Troop gateway 1993 Jamboree.jpg
Council gateway during the 1993 National Scout Jamboree at Fort A.P. Hill
Owner Boy Scouts of America
Location Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, United States Virgin Islands[1]
Country United States
Coordinates 39°00′26″N 77°05′53″W / 39.007331°N 77.097976°W / 39.007331; -77.097976
Founded 1911[2]
President James Smith
Council Commissioner Garry Lewis
Scout Executive Les Baron
Website
ncacbsa.org
 Scouting portal

The National Capital Area Council (NCAC) is a local council of the Boy Scouts of America within the Northeast Region and serves Scouts in the Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, and the United States Virgin Islands.[1] The council offers extensive training, and administrative support to units.[3] It is rated as a "Class 100" council by the National Council (headquarters office), which denotes that the NCAC is among the very largest in the country. Chartered in 1911, it is also one of the oldest. The council is divided into 23 districts serving ten counties in Northern Virginia, six counties in Maryland, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. The council has a 2.5 to 1 ratio of youth members to adult leaders, which is among the highest of all the councils. The youth retention rate approaches 80%.[4]

History[edit]

William D. Boyce incorporated the Boy Scouts of America at 11:03 am on February 8, 1910 in the district on the advice of railroad executive and later first national president of the organization Colin H. Livingstone, with assistance from lawyers at the firm Ralston, Siddons and Richardson.[5] A year later the National Capital Area Council was formed.[2] The oldest unit in the council is Troop 52, out of All Saints Episcopal Church in Chevy Chase.[6] This unit dates all the way back to 1913.[6] When the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia decided that the security of suffrage marchers in 1916 was not their problem, Troop 52 Scouts took up that duty.[6] Starting in 1996 the council annually sponsored the Commodore Henry I. Nygard Regatta along with the Friends of Sea Scouts of Maryland.[7]:3

Many have served as council executive over the years. Linn Drake "headed the council through two world wars, [and] a depression."[8]:115 Clarence F. Urferr served as council executive from September 1, 1944 to March 1946, when he moved to Dallas to take over Region 3.[8]:115 Kenneth Spears served as council executive from March 1946 to 1851, when he was recalled by the US Air Force in the Korean War.[8]:116 Randolf Flythe left the council executive position to become the Northeast regional director.[9] Ron Carroll served as council executive from 1990 to 2005.[8]:116 The most famous member of the council advisory board was Vince Lombardi.[10]

Organization[edit]

The National Capital Area Council is divided into service areas, districts, and one Learning for Life division. [11]

  • Mountain West Service Area
    • Appalachian Trail District—Mt Airy, Middletown, New Market, Urbana and Frederick City South
    • Catoctin Mountain District—Emmitsburg, Frederick City (North), Libertytown, Mt. Airy, Mt. Pleasant, New Market, Thurmont, Walkersville and Woodsboro
    • Goose Creek District— Loudoun County
    • Powhatan District— Great Falls, Herndon, Reston, Chantilly, Oak Hill and Oakton
    • Sully District— Southwest Fairfax County
  • Montgomery Service Area
    • Potomac District—Montgomery County
    • Seneca District—Montgomery County
    • White Oak District—Montgomery County
  • Virginia Central Service Area
    • Chain Bridge District— McLean and Arlington
    • Colonial District— Alexandria and Eastern Fairfax County
    • George Mason District— Fairfax City, Falls Church City, Vienna, Merrifield, Dunn Loring, and Portions of Oakton
    • Old Dominion District— Falls Church, Annandale, Alexandria, and Springfield
    • Patriot District— Annandale, Burke, Fairfax City, and Fairfax Station
  • Virginia South Service Area
    • Aquia District— Stafford County
    • Bull Run District— Bristow, Gainesville, Haymarket, Manassas, Manassas Park and Nokesville in Prince William County
    • Mattaponi District— Bowling Green, Caroline County, Dahlgren, City of Fredericksburg, King Georges County, and Spotsylvania County
    • Occoquan District— Dumfries, Dale City, Lake Ridge, Occoquan, Triangle, Woodbridge, and Montclair in Eastern Prince William County
    • Piedmont District— Bealeton, Catlett, Delaplane, Midland, Morrisonville, Orlean, Remington, Warrenton, The Plains in Culpeper and Fauquier Counties
  • United States Virgin Islands Service Area
    • St. Croix
    • St. John
    • Water Island
    • St. Thomas islands
  • Three Rivers Service Area
    • Patuxent District—Prince George’s County and parts of Charles County.
    • Washington, DC District—formerly Benjamin Bannekar and Horizon districts.
    • Western Shore District—Calvert and Saint Mary's Counties

Goshen Scout Reservation[edit]

Goshen Scout Reservation
Owner National Capital Area Council
Location 340 Millard Burke Memorial Highway (VA Route 601)
Goshen, Virginia 22439
National Capital Area Council is located in USA Virginia Goshen Scout Reservation
Lake Merriweather
Lake Merriweather
Camp PMI
Camp PMI
Camp Bowman
Camp Bowman
Goshen Dam
Goshen Dam
Camp Post
Camp Post
Camp Olmsted
Camp Olmsted
Camp Ross
Camp Ross
Camp Baird
Camp Baird
Camp Marriott
Camp Marriott
Coordinates 37°58′01″N 79°28′10″W / 37.967°N 79.4695°W / 37.967; -79.4695
Camp size 4,000-acre (16 km2)
Founded 1967 (1967)
Website
ncacbsa.org/outdoors/goshen-camps

Three Boy Scouts of America resident summer camps, two Cub Scout resident camps, and one high adventure resident camp occupy the land purchased in 1960 by the National Capital Area Council that borders the Goshen and Little North Mountain Wildlife Management Area and Little Calfpasture River outside of Goshen, Virginia for $300,000 that is now Goshen Scout Reservation, often called just Goshen.[12] Each camp program includes camping, swimming, merit badge counseling, shooting sports, boating, all-terrain vehicle riding, ecology education and Scoutcraft activities.[13]

The camps are all built around the 425 acres (1,720,000 m2) Lake Merriweather, that was created by damming the Little Calfpasture River in 1966,[12] before it joins with the Calfpasture to become the Maury, with a structure 38 feet (12 m) high and 1,300 feet (400 m) long.[14] Lake Merriweather was named for Marjorie Merriweather Post, an ardent supporter of Scouting in the Washington, DC area.[15]:51 U.S. Steel public relations executive William G. Whyte helped acquire the tract of more than 4,000 acres (16 km2) that is now the land of the Goshen Scout Reservation.[16]

Scout asking a question at a Goshen Scout camp

The Goshen reservation is the sum of seven separate camps circling Lake Merriweather. Camp Baird focuses on high adventure experiences.[17] Camp Bowman, Marriott and Olmsted all focus on Boy Scouts.[18] Camp PMI and Ross focus on Webelos.[18] Bowman is the only camp that still provides meals where each unit's patrols all prepare their own meal at their own campsites, the other camps use dining halls.[18] Camp Post focuses on administrative functions and facilities used by all campers like the COPE climbing tower and ropes course.[19]:286

During the first season of the drama 24 the fictional character Kim Bauer wears a Goshen Boy Scout Reservation shirt.[20] In commemoration of Goshen Scout Reservation's 50th anniversary, the National Capital Area Council is hosting a camporee for all council Scouts and alumni on Memorial Day weekend 2017. The event features an arena show that includes a performance by the Gold Top County Ramblers.[21]

Camp William B. Snyder[edit]

Camp William B. Snyder
Image showing the Marriott Dining Hall at Camp William B. Snyder
Marriott Dining Hall at Camp William B. Snyder
Location 6100 Antioch Road
Haymarket, VA, 20169
Camp William B. Snyder is located in Northern Virginia
Camp William B. Snyder
Camp William B. Snyder
Camp William B. Snyder is located in the US
Camp William B. Snyder
Camp William B. Snyder
Coordinates 38°48′36″N 77°41′26″W / 38.8100879°N 77.6904586°W / 38.8100879; -77.6904586
Camp size 405 acres (1.64 km2)
Founded May 6, 2006 (May 6, 2006) [22]
Website
ncacbsa.org/outdoors/camp-william-b-snyder

Camp William B. Snyder or just Snyder is an 405-acre (1.64 km2) Cub Scout Camp in Prince William, Virginia, owned by the National Capital Area Council of Boy Scouts of America.[22] It is one of the largest Cub Scout Camps in the United States, with a dining hall that can accommodate 600 dinners at one time.[23] The dining hall displays a picture of the building's namesake, Eagle Scout and Marriott International executive Stephen Marriott, during his time as a Scout.[24] Chairman of program development Raymond Johns said that the camp will serve about 1,000 Cub Scouts a week.[25] Program areas include an archaeological site, archery, air rifle range, boating, campfire, ecology education, fishing, ga-ga pit, handicrafts, sailing ship, swimming pool, and western style fort.[26] Both Bald Eagles and Red Tail Hawks can be seen at the camp.[27]

In 1994 Disney Incorporated bought extensive amounts of land in Haymarket, Virginia for a proposed Disney's America theme park.[28] Local resistance to the resort led to its end as a viable idea.[29] William B. Snyder, a local business man convinced Disney to sell the property to him. Snyder, in turn, sold off most of the land to developers, except for the 405 acres (1.64 km2) donated to the National Capital Area Council.[22] Brian Luss served as the initial camp director.[23]

Scouts at Camp William B. Snyder

In addition to summer camps, the camp has also hosted diverse Scouting events. On May 3, 2008 the camp hosted more than 4,000 at the council-wide spring camporee, which included a visit from McGruff the Crime Dog.[30] On May 28-29, 2016 the camp hosted the joint Jewish and Islamic Committee on Scouting Annual Camporee.[31] On October 29, 2016 the camp hosted simulations of both an airplane and a school bus crash where volunteer victims acted out fictional injuries for Scouts to practice emergency aid skills.[32] More than 1,000 Scouts and leaders from the Bull Run, Occoquan, Patriot and Sully Districts participated along with representatives from the Amangamek Wipit Lodge, American Red Cross, Asymmetric Warfare Group, Aviation Institute of Maintenance, Cookies and Cream, Fairfax County Sheriff's Office, George Mason Reserve Officers' Training Corps Cadets, Halloween Spirit Store, Lowe's, Outback Steakhouse, Prince William County Department of Fire and Rescue, Prince William County Police Department, Shawn Landry & Quality Business Engineering, and the Virginia Airborne Search and Rescue Squad.[33] From Jan 20, 2017 to Jan 22, 2017 the camp hosted the Sully District annual Klondike Derby which included competitions in: trail cooking, first aid, tomahawk throwing, pioneering, fishing, orienteering, log sawing, fire building, COPE games, a sled race, and a chili cook-off.[34] The campfire show and awards ceremony were provided by arrowmen of the Amangamek-Wipit Lodge.[34]

The camp has hosted events not connected to Scouting as diverse as USA Cycling Sportif Cross Cup Series, Sound United Drumline rehearsal, and the Northern Virginia Mormon Prom.[35] For several years the The Alexandria-Fairfax Alumni Chapter of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity run Kamp Kappa at Camp Snyder.[36] Kamp Kappa campers are young men between the ages of 10-16 years physical challenges to encourage creative thinking, team building, self-respect, and respect for others.[36] Group discussions and lectures cover health and drug awareness, cultural diversity, personal hygiene, and etiquette.[36] Kamp Kappa also makes use of all the camp outdoor oriented facilities like canoeing, hiking, and swimming.[36] Every September from 2005 to 2008 the Goose Creek district held a model rocket launching event at the camp.[37] The camp was one of many official National Get Outdoors sites on the first annual National Get Outdoors Day on June 14, 2008.[38]:74 On June 4, 2010 at the camp the Forest Service and Prince William County Public Schools partnered to hold a conservation education program for 500 students that culminated in youth participants earning the Junior Forest Ranger distinction.[39] On May 11, 2012 at the camp the Prince William Area Agency on Aging hosted a picnic with over 400 participants.[40] May 13-14, 2014 the camp hosted the inaugural National Capital Area Council Sporting Clays Tournament, which returned in 2015, then in 2016 was renamed the Sporting Clays Classic.[41] On September 19, 2015 the camp hosted the Outdoor Channel production crew of the show National Rifle Association All Access who worked with dozens of local Scouts demonstrating several different types of shooting for a season five episode of the show.[42] On March 26, 2016 the camp hosted an Easter egg hunt for 0-10 year-old children with a costumed Easter Bunny.[43]

Camp Howard M. Wall[edit]

Camp Howard M. Wall
Camp Wall Sunset
Location Boy Scout Camp, Christiansted
Saint Croix, 00820 USVI
Camp Howard M. Wall is located in USA VI Saint Croix
Camp Howard M. Wall
Camp Howard M. Wall
Camp Howard M. Wall is located in the Virgin Islands
Camp Howard M. Wall
Camp Howard M. Wall
Camp Howard M. Wall is located in Earth
Camp Howard M. Wall
Camp Howard M. Wall
Coordinates 17°43′00″N 64°40′01″W / 17.7167907°N 64.6669458°W / 17.7167907; -64.6669458
Camp size 19-acre (0.077 km2)[44]
Website
scoutparadise.org

Named for Howard M. Wall, who added the estates Fareham, Petronella, and Longford to the Castle Nugent Farms cattle ranch in 1951, the Camp Howard M. Wall at Milord Point Beach on Route 62 at Great Pond Bay, in Estate Fareham, USVI is on the southeast end of Saint Croix.[45] The camp is "located at the west side of Great Pond Bay."[46] The camp offers bunkhouses intended to accommodate eight people per room, a shower house with gender segregated facilities, and a dinning hall.[47] Other facilities include a climbing tower, ropes course, central pavilion, and rifle range.[44]

In addition to "summer" camps, Camp Wall is actually open for summer camp type programs year round, other Scouting events take place there. On September 29, 2012 the camp hosted the Eagle Court of Honor ceremony for Ricardo “Danny” Nieves of St. Croix.[48] On May 7, 2016 the camp hosted the Eagle Court of Honor ceremony for Ryan Patrick McCormack of St. Croix.[49]

The camp has also hosted events not connected to Scouting. Since 2016 Catch The Vision International has sponsored an annual mission trip where participants stay at the camp.[47] On June 21, 2012 at the camp the Virgin Islands National Guard hosted Shadow Warriors Fun Day, which included meeting Kofi Kingston.[50] On June 25-30, 2012 at the camp the US Virgin Islands National Guard Youth Program held the St. Croix Youth Leadership Camp.[51]

View of camp facing Great Pond Bay[52]

Camp Roosevelt[edit]

Camp Roosevelt
Location Chesapeake Beach, Maryland
Camp Roosevelt is located in Maryland
Camp Roosevelt
Camp Roosevelt
Camp Roosevelt is located in the US
Camp Roosevelt
Camp Roosevelt
Coordinates 38°38′17″N 76°31′41″W / 38.638052°N 76.528076°W / 38.638052; -76.528076
Founded 1914[53]
Defunct 1967

Camp Roosevelt existed 9 miles (14 km) south of Chesapeake Beach, Maryland from 1914 to 1967.[54] When the camp was a shared summer camp of both Washington and Baltimore councils in 1914 the camp was called Camp Archibald Butt.[55] "Camp Roosevelt was the first permanent Boy Scout camp in the country."[56] The Calvert County visitors guide refers to the camp as, "Maryland's first permanent Boy Scout camp."[57] Camp Roosevelt employed many counselors over the years of the camp's life including Richard A. Adams who would serve in the Royal Air Force then the United States Army Air Forces, and later found Adams Company Realty in Wheaton.[58]:B7 The camp is the location of the founding of the Clan of the Mystic Oak in 1921, an honor society with goals to “further Scouting, advance the interests of Camp Roosevelt, and to promote fellowship among its members.”[55]

Camp sites were called ranches.[55] Each site was named for places related to Theodore Roosevelt like Big Horn, Buckskin, Chimney Butte,Elk Horn, Powder River, and San Juan.[55] "There were several buildings on the property, notably a large mess hall, an infirmary and several Adirondack cabins."[53]

From July 24, 1922 to August 6, 1922 the camp ran a program specifically for Scouts active with the Catholic Churches of Washington organized by Boy Scout Bureau Washington District Council National Council of Catholic Men chairman Dr. TJ Murphy.[59] Trinity Episcopal Church rector, reverend J. C. M. Shrewsbury, took Troop 102 of Upper Marlboro to the camp for two weeks on Jul 25, 1927.[60]:6

On September 24, 1952 during the meeting that dissolved the Clan of the Mystic Oak that organization purchased a memorial in the name of the organization to Dr. Walter H. Merrill, who had served as a doctor at Camp Roosevelt.[55] Ralph Lauren's first time golfing came at the camp when he was age 14 in 1953.[61]:F3 70 flu cases in 1957 caused the camp to close early on July 11.[62]:E1 The camp was sold in the late 1970s.[63] Today the property is "now a residential area."[64]:T1

Amangamek-Wipit Lodge #470 - Order of the Arrow[edit]

Amangamek-Wipit Lodge
Amangamek Wipit.svg
Totem Arrow & Washington Monument superimposed on a shark tooth
Founded 1952
Lodge Chief Nate Dudley
Lodge Vice Chief Beckman Hollis
Lodge Adviser Art Widmann
Staff Adviser Don Durbin
Website
ncacbsa.org/program/order-of-the-arrow

In 1915, at Treasure Island Scout Reservation on the Delaware River E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson started an honor society, Wimachtendienk ("Brotherhood" in the Lenape language), to recognize Scouts who best implemented the Scout Oath and Scout Law as examples to follow.[65] This organization is today known as the Order of the Arrow.[66]

Six years later and 200 miles (320 km) away at Camp Roosevelt a group that called itself the Clan of the Mystic Oak formed in 1921, with the nearly identical goals of “further Scouting, advance the interests of Camp Roosevelt, and to promote fellowship among its members.”[55] While the Clan of the Mystic Oak was specific to Camp Roosevelt in Chesapeake Beach, Maryland, the Order of the Arrow spread across the country as it formed new lodges. Lodges are the smallest standard unit of the order and each is chartered to a local scout council. The National Capital Area Council chartered what is now called the Amangamek-Wipit lodge on March 12, 1952.[67]:14 At the time of the first banquet on December 29, 1952 Amangamek-Wipit had 89 members.[68]:2-1 That growth was enough to convince the Clan of the Mystic Oak members to dissolve the clan and join the order [69] at a meeting on September 24, 1952.[55]

When chartered in 1952 the Amangamek-Wipit lodge had no name.[68]:2-1 With scouts at Camp Roosevelt finding numerous shark teeth along the Chesapeake since 1914 the lodge decided to incorporate that history into their totem by placing the Washington Monument on an arrow on a shark's tooth at a meeting in June 1953.[68]:2-1 Following the advice of a Smithsonian Institution language expert that there was no word for shark, and Amanquemack translated to large fish, the lodge adopted the name Amanquemack at that same meeting.[68]:2-1 In 1952 the members voted to change the lodge name to Amangamek-Wipit after learning that Amangamek was the correct word for large fish and Wipit was the correct word for tooth.[67]:14

As a charter member of Area 3c the lodge participated in the 1953 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Darden.[70] The lodge participated in the 1954 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Rock Enon.[71] The lodge participated in the 1955 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Shawondasee.[72] The lodge hosted the 1956 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Roosevelt.[67]:14 The lodge participated in the 1957 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Powhatan.[73] The lodge participated in the 1958 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Shenandoah.[74] The lodge participated in the 1959 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Shawondasee.[75] The lodge participated in the 1960 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Monocan.[76] The lodge participated in the 1961 area 3c Pow Wow at the Pipsico Scout Reservation.[77] The lodge participated in the 1962 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Rock Enon.[78] The lodge participated in the 1963 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Powhatan.[79] The lodge participated in the 1964 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Monocan.[80] The lodge hosted the 1965 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Wilson.[81] The lodge participated in the 1966 area 3c Training Conference at the Pipsico Scout Reservation.[82] The lodge participated in the 1967 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Shenandoah.[83] The lodge participated in the 1968 area 3c Pow Wow at Camp Powhatan.[84] The lodge participated in the 1969 area 3c Pow Wow at the Virginia State Fairgrounds in Richmond.[85] The lodge participated in the 1970 area 3c Pow Wow at the Siouan Scout Reservation.[86] The lodge participated in the 1971 area 3c Pow Wow at the Pipsico Scout Reservation.[87] The lodge participated in the 1973 section Southeast 1 Pow Wow at Camp Rock Enon.[88] The lodge participated in the 1973 National Order of the Arrow Conference at the University of California-Santa Barbara.[89] The lodge participated in the 1974 section Southeast 1 Conclave at the Siouan Scout Reservation.[90]

Stores[edit]

National Capital Area Council is located in Washington Metropolitan Area
National Capital Scout Shop
National Capital Scout Shop
Northern Virginia Scout Shop
Northern Virginia Scout Shop
NCAC Trading Post at Camp Snyder
NCAC Trading Post at Camp Snyder

The council currently maintains three official stores within the Washington metropolitan area that sell official merchandise like uniform items, pinewood derby supplies, merit badge pamphlets, patches and camping equipment; as well as branded materials like office supplies, home decor, and gift items. The first store, the National Capital Scout Shop, is located at 9190 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814 at the council headquarters. The second store, the Northern Virginia Scout Shop, is located at 5232 Port Royal Rd, Springfield, VA 22151. The third store, NCAC Trading Post at Camp Snyder, is located at 6100 Antioch Rd, Haymarket, VA 20169 within Camp Snyder. The council plans to open another store in the U.S. Virgin Islands.[91]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Virgin Islands Council now part of National Capital Area Council". Scout Wire. 2013-03-21. Retrieved 2014-01-21. 
  2. ^ a b Agnew, Jeff; Durbin, Don; Eyck, Greg (November 1, 2011). "Local Scout Council, Capital Area Food Bank, WUSA-TV, Safeway and The Washington Examiner team up to nourish area's hungry" (PDF). Retrieved 26 February 2017. 
  3. ^ Wood, Bob (August 2015). "NCAC 5 Year Strategic Plan" (PDF). National Capital Area Council. Retrieved 20 February 2017. 
  4. ^ "2013 Annual Report by National Capital Area Council". 
  5. ^ Wendell, Bryan (February 8, 2017). "We know the date (Feb. 8, 1910), but at what time was the BSA founded?". Boy Scouts of America. Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c Hendrix, Steve (June 23, 2012). "Washington's oldest scout troop also its most well-connected". Washington Post. Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  7. ^ Yeckley, Doug (2004). "Henry I. Nygard Regatta". Telegraph (Volume 8, No. 1). Northeast Region Sea Scouting Committee. 
  8. ^ a b c d Davis, Winston (Jun 27, 2013). Men of Schiff, A History of the Professional Scouters Who Built the Boy Scouts of America. Lulu. 
  9. ^ "On the Move". Black Enterprise. Apr 1985. 
  10. ^ Phillips, Donald T. (Apr 1, 2007). Run to Win: Vince Lombardi on Coaching and Leadership. St. Martin's. p. 224. ISBN 1429979348. 
  11. ^ Wood, Bob. "Districts". National Capital Area Council. Retrieved 18 February 2017. 
  12. ^ a b "Chronology of Construction, Operation, and Maintenance of Lake Merriweather and Goshen Dam" (PDF) (Press release). Rockbridge Area Conservation Council. January 16, 2015. Retrieved May 5, 2016. 
  13. ^ Programs include:
    Gangsaas, Anna. "Camp Bowman". Retrieved 18 February 2017. 
    "Falls Church Scouts complete backpacking trek : Falls Church Times". Archived from the original on May 3, 2016. Retrieved 2016-05-03. 
    Mummolo, Jonathan (August 5, 2008). "Boy Scout Camp's Closure Is a First". Washington Post. Retrieved 25 February 2017. :B01
  14. ^ Associated Press. (2010-09-03). "Virginia Residents Worry About 'High Hazard' Dam". Claims Journal. Archived from the original on May 3, 2016. Retrieved 2016-05-03. 
  15. ^ Evans, Rick (Dec 2009). 50 Year Adventure. Rick Evans. ISBN 978-0-557-12732-0. 
  16. ^ Bernstein, Adam (2010-04-27). "U.S. Steel executive and friend of President Ford". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C., United States. pp. –5. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2016-05-03. 
  17. ^ Camp Baird:
    "Falls Church Scouts complete backpacking trek : Falls Church Times". Archived from the original on May 3, 2016. Retrieved 2016-05-03. 
    Boys' Life. Boy Scouts of America. Dec 1988. :34
  18. ^ a b c "Goshen Scout Reservation". Scouting Magazine. Retrieved 22 February 2017. 
  19. ^ Virginia Wildlife. Virginia Commission of Game and Inland Fisheries. 1970. Retrieved 2016-05-02. 
  20. ^ Kim Bauer in Goshen Scout Camps Shirt
  21. ^ "Goshen 50th Anniversary." National Capital Area Council - Boy Scouts of America, <http://www.ncacbsa.org/goshen50/>.
  22. ^ a b c Stewart, Nikita (2006-04-05). "$17 Million Camp Pledges Cub Scout Nirvana in Va.: [FINAL Edition]". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C., United States. pp. –01. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2016-05-08. 
  23. ^ a b Weimar, Carrie (2006-05-01). "For his devotion, a Scouts honor". St. Petersburg Times. St. Petersburg, FL. Retrieved 2016-06-14. 
  24. ^ Bernstein, Adam (June 24, 2013). "Stephen Marriott dies: Hotel chain official was 54". Washington Post. Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  25. ^ Stewart, Nikita (2006-04-05). "Theme Park-Like Camp for Cub Scouts Built on Old Disney Site". The Washington Post. Washington , DC. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2016-06-22. 
  26. ^ Program areas:
    Pruett, Curtis (2011-08-10). "Camp William B. Snyder & Cub World". Museums USA. Retrieved 2016-06-14. 
    Folks, Chris (Aug 31, 2011). "Pack 1673's summer camp fun included hands-on archaeology". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
    Harris, Scott (July 28, 2007). "Camp Snyder". Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
    Durnal, Joseph M. "Cub World at Camp William B. Snyder Day One". Joseph M. Durnal. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
    Richardson, Steve (Sep 21, 2015). "Camp Snyder Wilderness Engineers - A Ga-Ga Success" (Fall 2015). Scouter Digest. Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  27. ^ Pruett, Curtis (2011-08-10). "Camp William B. Snyder & Cub World". Museums USA. Retrieved 2016-06-14. 
  28. ^ Wines, Michael (1993-11-12). "A Disneyland of History Next to the Real Thing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-05-08. 
  29. ^ Powell, Elizabeth A.; Stover, Sarah (2010-07-26). The Third Battle of Bull Run: The Disney's America Theme Park (A). Charlottesville. pp. 1–19. Retrieved 2016-05-08. 
  30. ^ Broderson, Jeff (May 2008). "McGruff Network" (PDF) (5). National Crime Prevention Council. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  31. ^ Tishkoff, Julian; Abdullah, Abdul Rashid; Patel, Tejas (2016). "Jewish Committee on Scouting & Islamic Committee on Scouting Annual Camporee". Marriott Scout Service Center. Archived from the original on 8 March 2017. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  32. ^ Foley, Mary (October 10, 2016). "This is the ultimate get dirty, act out, sacrifice your old clothes event". Potomac Local. Retrieved 22 February 2017. 
  33. ^ Byrne, Dave (November 3, 2016). "Boy Scouts practice emergency skills at "Trauma-Rama" Camporee in Haymarket". What's Up Woodbridge. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  34. ^ a b "Sully District Scouts Compete in Klondike Derby". Fairfax Connection. February 15, 2017. Retrieved 22 February 2017. 
  35. ^ USA Cycling Sportif Cross Cup Series:
    "USAC BikeneticX 2016". December 11, 2016. Retrieved 18 February 2017. 
    Sound United Drumline rehearsal:
    "Rehearsal – Saturday, November 16th". November 15, 2014. Retrieved 18 February 2017. 
    Northern Virginia Mormon Prom:
    "Enchanted Forest". Retrieved 18 February 2017. 
  36. ^ a b c d Washington, Conrad. "Kamp Kappa". Alexandria-Fairfax (VA) Alumni Chapter (E) of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  37. ^ "Webelos-O-ree Rocket events". Boy Scout Troop 970. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  38. ^ "Motorhomes". National RV Trader (July 2008). Dominion Enterprises. July 2008. 
  39. ^ Samman, Safiya. "ED OUT" (PDF). US Forest Service. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 23 February 2017. 
  40. ^ Rothrock, James (2012). "Older Americans Month" (PDF). Virginia Division for the Aging. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  41. ^ Sporting Clays Tournament, renamed the Sporting Clays Classic:
    2014: Schloss, Margo (May 8, 2014). "Inaugural Boy Scouts of the National Capital Area Clay Shoot Tournament at Camp Snyder Haymarket VA May 14". Prince William Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
    2015: "2015 Sporting Clays Tournament". The Scouter Digest. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
    2016: "Sporting Clays". Capitol Area Council. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  42. ^ "Boy Scouts Get A Surprise at NRA All Access Filming". NRA Blog. September 22, 2015. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  43. ^ "Easter Egg Hunt at Camp William B. Snyder". Dulles Moms. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  44. ^ a b Loveland, Jimmy. "USVI Open/Atlantic Blue Marlin Tournament". Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
  45. ^ Namesake:
    Barrett, John. "Castle Nugent Farms Special Resource Study". National Park Service. Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
    Location:
    Bowman, Russ. "A Lot Can Happen In Five Years". Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
  46. ^ Adams, Roy E. (September 21, 1993). "U.S. Virgin Islands St. Croix Great Pond and Great Pond Bay Area of Particular Concern (APC) and Area of Preservation and Restoration (APR) a Comprehensive Analytic Study" (PDF). Virgin Islands Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Coastal Zone Management Program. Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  47. ^ a b French, Jerry (2017). "2017 St. Croix Guide" (PDF). Catch The Vision International. Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
  48. ^ "Scout Preserves the Past to Fly Like an Eagle". St. Croix Realty Blog. October 2, 2012. Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  49. ^ "St. Croix Boy Scout earns Eagle Scout award". Virgin Islands Daily News. May 3, 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  50. ^ "June 21" (PDF). Inside (5). Virgin Islands National Guard. June 2012. Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  51. ^ Matthew, Marvin L (2012). "Annual Report" (PDF). US Virgin Islands National Guard Youth Program. Retrieved 25 February 2017. 
  52. ^ Trotter, Andrew (May 25, 2016). "St. Croix: What A Place". Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
  53. ^ a b Mike Benton; Gregg Dotson; Randy Hummel; Greg McNeill; Gwen Schiada; Ken Wilcox (2013-07-15), Bayside History Museum, Calvert County Tourism 
  54. ^ 1914 to 1967:
    Mike Benton; Gregg Dotson; Randy Hummel; Greg McNeill; Gwen Schiada; Ken Wilcox (2013-07-15), Bayside History Museum, Calvert County Tourism 
    "Best Bets" (Final Edition). Washington Post. Jan 25, 2007.  :T5
  55. ^ a b c d e f g Eby, David; Myers, Paul (1994). "Clan of the Mystic Oak". U. S. Scouting Service Project. Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
  56. ^ First US Boy Scout camp:
    Mike Benton; Gregg Dotson; Randy Hummel; Greg McNeill; Gwen Schiada; Ken Wilcox (2013-07-15), Bayside History Museum, Calvert County Tourism 
    Lazarus, Elizabeth (April 9, 1987). "Getting an Inside Look at Area Homes and Gardens" (Final Edition). Washington Post.  :T10
  57. ^ Vassallo, Linda (2012). "Choose Calvert". Calvert County Department of Economic Development. Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
  58. ^ "Rear Adm. Richard Lane Dies at 82". Washington Post. Apr 28, 1994. 
  59. ^ McCann, Francis (1922). "Boy Scouts Active in National Capital". National Catholic Welfare Council Bulletin. 4 (1): 22. 
  60. ^ "In the Capital Suburbs". Washington Post. July 24, 1927. 
  61. ^ Hyde, Nina (July 9, 1989). "Fashion Notes" (Final Edition). Washington Post. 
  62. ^ Brown, David (Aug 25, 2009). "Lessons From the Flu of '57". Washington Post. 
  63. ^ "Shorpy Historical Photo Archive :: Group Shot: 1925". Shorpy.com. 1925-07-09. Retrieved 2014-01-21. 
  64. ^ Wan, William (June 25, 2006). "Sands of Time Stand Still in a Calvert Beach House". Washington Post. 
  65. ^ Origin of the Order of the Arrow:
    Order of the Arrow Handbook. Boy Scouts of America. 1977. ISBN 0-8395-5000-6. 
    "Extended History of the Order of the Arrow". Quelqueshoe Lodge 166. Archived from the original on November 19, 2008. Retrieved February 7, 2009. 
  66. ^ "Extended History of the Order of the Arrow". Quelqueshoe Lodge 166. Archived from the original on November 19, 2008. Retrieved February 7, 2009. 
  67. ^ a b c Nicely, Brocky (Apr 1981). "SE-1 Manual of Lodges" (PDF). Retrieved 18 February 2017. 
  68. ^ a b c d Lodge Operating Procedures. National Capital Area Council. Feb 20, 2012. 
  69. ^ members would say “join the brotherhood”
  70. ^ Charter member:
    Nicely, Brocky (Apr 1981). "SE-1 Manual of Lodges" (PDF). Retrieved 18 February 2017. :14
    Pow Wow:
    Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1953 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  71. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1954 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  72. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1955 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  73. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1957 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  74. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1958 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  75. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1959 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  76. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1960 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  77. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1961 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  78. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1962 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  79. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1963 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  80. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1964 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  81. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1965 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  82. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1966 Area 3-C Training Conference". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  83. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1967 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  84. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1968 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  85. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "196_ Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  86. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1970 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  87. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 31, 2010). "1971 Area 3-C Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  88. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 26, 2010). "1973 SE-1 Pow Wow". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  89. ^ Chase, Glenn (Jan 18, 2011). "1973 National OA Conference". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  90. ^ Chase, Glenn (December 26, 2010). "1974 SE-1 Conclave". Virginia Order of the Arrow. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  91. ^ "Scout Store". National Capital Area Council. Retrieved August 29, 2016.