Virginia A. Phillips

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Virginia Anne Phillips
Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
In office
July 1, 2016 – May 31, 2020
Preceded byGeorge H. King
Succeeded byCormac J. Carney
Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
Assumed office
November 15, 1999
Appointed byBill Clinton
Preceded byWilliam Matthew Byrne Jr.
Personal details
Born
Virginia Anne Ettinger

(1957-02-14) February 14, 1957 (age 64)
Orange, California
EducationUniversity of California, Riverside (B.A.)
UC Berkeley School of Law (J.D.)

Virginia Anne Phillips (born February 14, 1957) is a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California.

Early life and education[edit]

Born (as Virginia Ettinger)[1] and raised in Orange, California,[2] Phillips received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, Riverside, in 1979 and a Juris Doctor from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law in 1982. She was in private practice in Riverside, California, from 1982 to 1991. She was a Commissioner for the Riverside County Superior Court from 1991 to 1995.

Judicial service[edit]

In 1995, Phillips became a United States Magistrate Judge of the Central District of California. On January 26, 1999, Phillips was nominated by President Bill Clinton to be a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California, to a seat vacated by William Matthew Byrne Jr. She was confirmed by the United States Senate on November 10, 1999, and received her commission on November 15, 1999. Phillips served as Chief Judge from July 1, 2016 to May 31, 2020.[3][4] Phillips has announced her intention to leave active judicial service on February 14, 2022, her sixty fifth birthday and her first day of eligibility to retire or take senior status. The Federal Judicial Center is unclear as whether her intention is to retire or take senior status, listing her vacancy reason as unknown.[5]

Notable cases[edit]

On September 9, 2010, Phillips ruled that the United States Department of Defense's "don't ask, don't tell" policy is unconstitutional in the case Log Cabin Republicans v. United States of America.[6] On October 12, Phillips issued a permanent worldwide injunction ordering the military to immediately "suspend and discontinue any investigation, or discharge, separation, or other proceeding, that may have been commenced" under "don't ask, don't tell".[7][8] The Ninth Circuit stayed the injunction pending appeal[9] but on July 6, 2011, lifted the stay.[10] On September 29, 2011, the Ninth Circuit vacated the district court's decision, ruling that the legislative repeal of "don't ask, don't tell" had rendered the case moot.[11][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Judge in "Don't ask" case: activist or model jurist?". Sign On San Diego. 2010-10-15. Retrieved 2010-11-03.
  2. ^ Mark Thompson (2010-10-19). "The Widow Judge Who Ended "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"". Time. Archived from the original on October 22, 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-03.
  3. ^ "Judge Virginia A. Phillips Succeeds Judge George H. King as Chief Judge - Central District of California - United States District Court". www.cacd.uscourts.gov.
  4. ^ "Judge Cormac J. Carney Succeeds Judge Virginia A. Phillips as Chief Judge of the Central District of California" (Press release). June 1, 2020. Retrieved June 7, 2020.
  5. ^ "Future Judicial Vacancies". United States Courts.
  6. ^ Schwartz, John (September 9, 2010). "Judge Rules That Military Policy Violates Rights of Gays". The New York Times. Retrieved September 10, 2010.
  7. ^ Adam Levine (October 12, 2010). "Judge orders military to stop enforcing 'don't ask, don't tell'". CNN. Retrieved October 12, 2010.
  8. ^ Pettersson, Edvard (October 12, 2010). "U.S. Military Barred by Judge From Enforcing 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Rule". Bloomberg L.P. Retrieved October 12, 2010.
  9. ^ "Ninth Circuit Order" (PDF).
  10. ^ "DADT Repeal: Court Orders Immediate Halt To Gay Military Ban". Huffington Post. July 6, 2011. Retrieved July 7, 2011.
  11. ^ Levine, Dan (September 29, 2011). "U.S. court vacates ruling on gays in military". Reuters. Retrieved October 24, 2011.
  12. ^ "Ninth Circuit opinion" (PDF). September 29, 2011. Retrieved November 20, 2011.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
1999–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
2016–2020
Succeeded by