Virginia Barrier Islands

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The Virginia Barrier Islands forming a line along the eastern coast of Delmarva.

The Virginia Barrier Islands are a continuous chain of long, narrow, low-lying, sand and scrub barrier islands separated from one another by narrow inlets and from the mainland by a series of shallow marshy tidal bays along the entire coast of the Virginia end of the Delmarva Peninsula.[1][2][3] The sole remaining habitation on these islands, the town Broadwater, Virginia, was evacuated in 1936 following a hurricane.[4] Because they are uninhabited they form an important ecological region, and several make up the Virginia Coast Reserve.[5]

The Virginia Barrier Islands terminate to the south at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and are preceded to the north by Fenwick Island, a barrier spit, not a true island, spanning the Maryland and Delaware border (Transpeninsular Line). They are, in order from north to south:


See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Barrier Islands Center on Virginia's Eastern Shore
  2. ^ Charles McGuigan (July–August 2012). "Virginia's Barrier Islands". North of the James Magazine. Retrieved 2014-07-27.
  3. ^ Brooks M. Barnes, Barry R. Truitt, and William W. Warner, eds., Seashore Chronicles: Three Centuries of the Virginia Barrier Islands, University Press of Virginia, 1997. ISBN 0-8139-1879-0
  4. ^ Fariss Samarrai (July 2000). "Shifting sands". University of Virginia, Arts & Sciences Magazine. Retrieved 2014-07-27.
  5. ^ Connie Bond. "Shifting sands". Chesapeake Bay Magazine. Retrieved 2014-07-27.
  6. ^ http://www.bayjournal.com/article/last_cedar_island_house_slips_into_sea
  7. ^ Barry Truitt, "Robert E. Lee: An Account of His Visit to Smith Island" in Brooks M. Barnes, Barry R. Truitt, and William W. Warner, eds., Seashore Chronicles: Three Centuries of the Virginia Barrier Islands, University Press of Virginia,1997.
  8. ^ Rowlett, Russ. "Lighthouses of the United States: Virginia". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

References[edit]

  • Brooks M. Barnes, Barry R. Truitt, and William W. Warner, eds., Seashore Chronicles: Three Centuries of the Virginia Barrier Islands, University Press of Virginia, 1997. ISBN 0-8139-1879-0
  • colespointmarina.com/shark-tooth-island/
Preceded by
Wallops Island
Beaches of Delmarva Succeeded by
Southernmost point