Virginia Senate, District 5

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District 5 of the Virginia Senate is a senatorial district that encompasses portions of the independent cities of Chesapeake and Norfolk in the U.S. state of Virginia. This district is represented by Democrat Kenny Alexander of Norfolk, who was elected in a special election on September 4, 2012 to replace the previous senator who died in office.

Historic boundaries[edit]

The 5th District was, from before 1940 until 1971, a Southside Virginia senate district, encompassing the counties of Isle of Wight, Nansemond, Southampton, and the City of Suffolk. On December 22, 1961, when the town of Franklin in Southampton County became an independent city, it was included in the 5th.[1] During most of this period, most African Americans throughout Virginia were disfranchised by provisions of the state constitution and discriminatory administration of the law. The district elected only white conservative Democrats.

The federal Voting Rights Act of 1965 authorized the federal government to oversee states and enforce the constitutional right to vote, and minorities regained their ability to exercise their franchise. In a late 20th-century realignment of political parties, white conservatives moved into the Republican Party. Democrats in Virginia now generally have liberal views, and the party has white and minority members, including most African Americans. The district elected Kenny Alexander in a special election to fill the position left empty after the incumbent died in office.

In 1971, a federal judge ordered the creation of a consolidated 3-member Senate District which included all of the City of Norfolk. This was to satisfy the federal constitutional requirement that all legislative districts be roughly equal in population.

Current boundaries[edit]

The 5th District comprises parts of the cities of Chesapeake, and Norfolk in the Hampton Roads area. The district includes Downtown Norfolk and most of Chesapeake inside the Hampton Roads Beltway.

Election history[edit]

Most recent elections[edit]

2012[edit]

Virginia special election, September 4, 2012: Senate District 5[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Kenny Alexander 3,643 98.51 +2.92%
Majority 3,588 98.51
Turnout 3,698 3.79%
Democratic hold

Previous elections[edit]

2011[edit]

Virginia state elections, 2011: Senate District 5[3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Yvonne Miller 11,090 95.59 -1.32%
Majority 10,579 91.19 -2.64%
Turnout 11,601
Democratic hold

2007[edit]

Virginia state elections, 2007: Senate District 5[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Yvonne Miller 10,977 96.91
Majority 10,627 93.83
Turnout 11,327 14.00%
Democratic hold

District officeholders[edit]

Since 1940

Years Senator, District 5 Counties/Cities in District
1940 - 1941 Edward Everett Holland (D) Isle of Wight County, Nansemond County, Southampton County, and the City of Suffolk
1941 - 1944 A. E. S. Stephens (D)
1944 - 1948
1948 - 1952
1952 - 1956 Mills Godwin (D)
1956 - 1960
1960 - 1961
1961 - 1964 William V. Rawlings (D) Isle of Wight County, Nansemond County, Southampton County, the City of Franklin and the City of Suffolk
1964 - 1968
1968 - 1972
1972 - 1976 Stanley C. Walker (D)
Peter K. Babalas (D)
Thomas R. McNamara
City of Norfolk, City of Virginia Beach (part). (Consolidated with Districts 6 and 7 to form a multi-member district)
1976 - 1980 Stanley C. Walker (D)
Peter K. Babalas (D)
Joseph T. Fitzpatrick (D)
1980 - 1982
1982 - 1984 Stanley C. Walker (D)
Peter K. Babalas (D)
Evelyn Momsen Hailey (D)
1984 - 1988 Peter K. Babalas (D) City of Norfolk (part).
1988 - 1992 Yvonne Miller (D)
1992 - 1996 City of Chesapeake (part), City of Norfolk (part).
1996 - 2000
2000 - 2004
2004 - 2008
2008 - 2012
2012 - 2016 Kenny Alexander (D)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tourism and History". City of Franklin, Virginia. Retrieved 19 November 2012. 
  2. ^ "September 4, 2012 Special Election Official Results". Office of the State Board of Elections (Virginia). Retrieved 19 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "November 2011 General Election Official Results". Office of the State Board of Elections (Virginia). Retrieved 14 August 2012. 
  4. ^ "November 2007 General Election Official Results". Office of the State Board of Elections (Virginia). Retrieved 19 September 2012.