Virginia Tech Hokies women's soccer

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Virginia Tech Hokies
2019 Virginia Tech Hokies women's soccer team
Virginia Tech Hokies logo.svg
Founded1980; 40 years ago (1980)
UniversityVirginia Tech
Head coachCharles Adair (9th season)
ConferenceACC
LocationBlacksburg, VA
StadiumSandra D. Thompson Field
(Capacity: 2,500)
NicknameHokies
ColorsChicago Maroon and Burnt Orange[1]
         
NCAA Tournament College Cup
2013
NCAA Tournament Quarterfinals
2013
NCAA Tournament Round of 16
2009, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2018
NCAA Tournament Round of 32
2009, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2018
NCAA Tournament appearances
2004, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2018, 2019

The Virginia Tech Hokies women's soccer team began in 1980 with two club teams under the guidance of Everett Germain and his two daughter's Betsy and Julie. Virginia Tech's women's soccer became a college soccer program that competes in NCAA Division I in 1993.[2] The team played in the A-10 and the Big East before moving to the Coastal Division of Atlantic Coast Conference in 2014. The team has advanced to the NCAA Women's soccer tournament nine times. Their best appearance is reaching the semifinals in 2013. Their home games are played at Sandra D. Thompson Field.[3]

History[edit]

1990s[edit]

The Virginia Tech Hokies women's soccer team began play under coach Sam Okpodu in 1993. The team had a respectable first season, finishing 6–10–1. The team began play without a conference. A small improvement followed in the team's second season. The Hokies finished with a record of 8–11–0. In 1995 the Hokies would begin play in the Atlantic 10 Conference, where the school was a member in other sports. The move proved difficult, with the Hokies finishing 3–12–3 overall, and 1–3–1 in their first conference season. However, improvement quickly followed, with the team achieving a .500 record in overall play and a winning record in conference play in 1996. The team won 9 games in each season from 1996-1999. Their loss record was remarkably consistent as well, with the Hokies losing 9 games from 1996-1998 and 10 in 1999.

2000s[edit]

The decade of the 2000s started in a very similar fashion with the team going 9–10–0. In 2000, the team did not participate in a conference as the university transitioned into joining the Big East Conference.[4] 2001 would be the team's first season in the Big East, and prove a difficult one. The Hokies finished 8–9–3 overall, but 1–8–1 in conference play. After the season, Sam Okpodu would leave as head coach to pursue an opportunity with the Nigerian National Team. Jerry Cheynet would switch from the men's team head coach to coach the women's team.[5] In his only season as head coach, the team would finish 6–11–1 and 2–4 in conference play. Kelly Cagle would take over as the programs third head coach in program history in 2003. She would achieve a 9–9 record in her first season. 2004 would prove to be a turning point year for the Hokies. First, the school joined the Atlantic Coast Conference.[6] In their first year in the ACC, the team would achieve their first winning season in program history, finishing 11–9–0. Additionally, they would qualify for their first postseason, qualifying for both the ACC Tournament and the NCAA Tournament. The 2004 postseason qualification was not followed up until 2008. The team posted losing records in 2005 and 2006. Despite a 8–7–3 record in 2007, the Hokies did not qualify for either tournament. In 2008, the Hokies were runners up in the ACC Tournament, their best finish in program history. They also began a run of qualifying for 8 straight NCAA tournaments in 2008. The decade closed with a program best for wins, with 16. The previous record was 2004, with 11. The Hokies also achieved only their second winning conference record in 2009.

2010s[edit]

The decade would start with the Hokies continuing to qualify for the ACC and NCAA tournaments, and winning double digit games. 2010 marked the third straight year the Hokies achieved each of those milestones. However, after the season coach Kelly Cagle resigned to relocate her family to the Southwest. Charles Adair was hired as her replacement. Adair had been the associate head coach for the past 5 years at Virginia Tech.[7] Adair would pick up where Cagle left off. In his first season, the Hokies won 14 games, and finally broke through the first round of the NCAA tournament. The team would reach the Sweet 16 for the first time in program history. In 2012, the Hokies finished 4–5–1 in conference play for the third straight year. This record was good enough to qualify for the ACC Tournament in the previous two years, but was not good enough in 2012. However, the team did make another NCAA Tournament appearance. 2013 was arguably the best season in program history. The Hokies set a program record for wins, with 19, finished as runner up in the ACC Tournament and reached the Semifinals of the NCAA Tournament. Their 9 conference wins are a program record by 3 wins. The Hokies couldn't repeat the heights of 2013 in 2014. The team finished with 16 wins, and notched another NCAA Sweet 16 appearance, but their 5–5 ACC record was not good enough to qualify for the tournament. This was in part because the ACC reduced the tournament size to 4 teams instead of 8. 2015 saw the Hokies win total drop by 1, to 15. They lost in the second round of the NCAA Tournament and missed the ACC Tournament despite a 6–3–1 conference record. 2016 would end a run of 8 straight NCAA appearances. The Hokies did finish with a winning record of 11–5–3, but had a sub par 3–4–3 conference record. The Hokies endured a disappointing 2017 where they went 1–5–4 in conference play. 2018 proved to be a rebound, with the team qualifying for the ACC and NCAA tournaments after a two year hiatus. The Sweet 16 appearance in the NCAA tournament was their best result since 2014.

Seasons[edit]

Season Head coach[8] Season result[9] Tournament results
Overall Conference Conference NCAA
Wins Losses Ties Wins Losses Ties
1993 Sam Okpodu 6 10 1 No Conference
1994 8 11 0 No Conference
1995† 3 12 3 1 3 1
1996 9 9 1 5 3 0
1997 9 9 1 4 6 1
1998 9 9 1 5 6 0
1999 9 10 0 5 6 0
2000 9 10 0 No Conference
2001‡ 8 9 3 1 8 1
2002 Jerry Cheynet 6 11 1 2 4 0
2003 Kelly Cagle 9 9 0 2 4 0
2004^ 11 9 0 4 5 0 First Round NCAA First Round
2005 6 10 3 1 7 2
2006 6 8 4 1 6 3
2007 8 7 3 3 5 2
2008 10 9 4 4 4 2 Runners Up NCAA First Round
2009 16 8 0 6 4 0 Second Round NCAA Round of 16
2010 10 10 1 4 5 1 First Round NCAA First Round
2011 Charles Adair 14 8 1 4 5 1 First Round NCAA Sweet 16
2012 13 6 1 4 5 1 NCAA First Round
2013 19 5 3 9 3 1 Runner Up NCAA Semifinals
2014 16 6 0 5 5 0 NCAA Sweet 16
2015 15 4 2 6 3 1 NCAA Second Round
2016 11 5 3 3 4 3
2017 7 6 5 1 5 4
2018 11 8 3 5 5 0 First Round NCAA Sweet 16
2019 12 5 2 4 4 2 NCAA First Round

† In 1995 the Hokies began play in the Atlantic 10 Conference.
‡ In 2001 the Hokies began play in the Big East Conference.
^ In 2004 the Hokies began play in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Personnel[edit]

2019 Roster[edit]

Source:[10]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
0 GK United States USA Dare Burnett
00 GK United States USA Alice Hamel
1 GK United States USA Mandy McGlynn
2 MF United States USA Holly Rose Weber
3 DF United States USA Jaylyn Thompson
4 MF United States USA Emily Gray
5 MF United States USA Cassidy Brown
6 DF United States USA Caroline Cipolla
7 MF United States USA Kiersten Hening
8 DF United States USA Kelsey Irwin
9 FW United States USA Emma Steigerwald
10 FW Ukraine UKR Nicole Kozlova
11 MF United States USA Grace Sklopan
12 FW United States USA Mikayla Mance
13 FW United States USA Karlie Johnson
No. Pos. Nation Player
14 MF United States USA Alexa Anderson
15 FW United States USA Allyson Brown
16 MF United States USA Jordan Hemmen
17 DF United States USA Olivia Odle
18 MF United States USA Kara Henderson
19 MF United States USA Lilly Weber
20 DF United States USA Caroline O'Connor
22 FW United States USA Bridget Patch
24 FW United States USA Emmalee McCarter
25 FW United States USA Calista Heister
26 FW United States USA Molly Feighan
27 DF United States USA Sydney Ash
28 MF United States USA Mak Graham
30 GK United States USA S.A. Phillips

Team Management[edit]

Position Staff
Head Coach Charles Adair
Associate Head Coach Drew Kopp
Assistant Coach Matt Gwilliam
Director of Operations Macaulay Soto

Source:[11]

Notable Alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Virginia Tech University Trademarks". Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  2. ^ "Virginia Tech Women's Soccer Record Book" (PDF). hokiesports.com. Virginia Tech Athletics. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  3. ^ "Thompson Field". hokiesports.com. Virginia Tech Athletics. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  4. ^ TSLMail #131 – Friday, June 11, 2004
  5. ^ Licker, Michael (October 17, 2002). "Tech's coach makes switch". dailyorange.com. The Daily Orange. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  6. ^ "Virginia Tech first to jump into ACC". espn.com. ESPN. June 30, 2003. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  7. ^ "Cagle resigns to relocate family". socceramerica.com. Soccer America. December 13, 2010. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  8. ^ 2018 Record Book, pp. 10
  9. ^ 2018 Record Book, pp. 7–9
  10. ^ "2019 Women's Soccer Roster". Virginia Tech Athletics. Retrieved November 18, 2019.
  11. ^ "Women's Soccer Coaching Staff". hokiesports.com. Virginia Tech Athletics. Retrieved August 15, 2019.

External links[edit]