Visa policy of Taiwan

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Entry stamp
Exit stamp
Entry and exit stamps.

Visitors to Taiwan must obtain a visa or authorization in advance, unless they come from one of the visa exempt countries or countries whose nationals are eligible for visa on arrival. All visitors must hold a passport valid for 6 months (except the citizens of Japan who can hold a passport valid for 3 months, and citizens of United States who are only required to hold a passport valid for the entire duration of stay).[1]

Taiwan has special entry requirements to current or former nationals of China who reside or previously resided in Mainland China.

Visa policy map[edit]

Visa policy of Taiwan

Visa exemption[edit]

Holders of passports of the following 48 jurisdictions do not require a visa to visit Taiwan for less than 90 days unless otherwise noted (duration of stay starts from the next day of arrival).[2][3] Extensions are not possible except for citizens of Canada and the United Kingdom, who may apply to extend the stay from 90 days to 180 days in accordance with the principle of reciprocity.[4]

The visa exemption does not apply for holders of emergency or temporary passports, except for citizens of United States. Other visa exempt nationals holding such passports, however, would still be able to apply for a visa on arrival.

Stateless permanent residents of Brunei holding the Bruneian International Certificate of Identity (ICI) with a validity of at least 6 months are also exempt from visa requirement until 31 July 2017.[6][2]

In addition, holders of diplomatic or official/service passports of Belize, Burkina Faso, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nauru, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Swaziland do not require a visa for up to 90 days.

Visa on arrival[edit]

Nationals of the following countries can obtain a visa on arrival for a fee:[7]

In addition, holders of emergency or temporary passports with validity of more than 6 months issued by visa-exempt countries are eligible for visa on arrival for a fee. The duration of stay is 30 days regardless of nationality and cannot be extended. This measure does not apply to holders of emergency or temporary passports issued by the United States as they are visa exempt.[7]

Visa on arrival is only available at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport. For passengers arriving at Taipei Songshan Airport, Kaohsiung International Airport or Taichung Airport, they would be issued a temporary entry permit and will have to apply for a visa at the Bureau of Consular Affairs office or one of the offices of Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Taiwan at their earliest convenience. Failure to comply may result in a derogatory record.[7] Passengers arriving at ports of entry other than those listed above will be denied entry.

Permanent residents of Hong Kong and Macau[edit]

Permanent residents of Hong Kong and/or Macau, who are either Chinese nationals or British Nationals (Overseas), may be eligible for an Exit & Entry Permit upon arrival for NT$300 or may apply for an Entry Permit online at no cost to visit Taiwan for less than 30 days.[1]

The requirements are:

First time applicants not born in Hong Kong or Macau are also able to apply for Exit and Entry Permit online from 8 February 2017. Unlike those qualified for the no-fee Entry Permit or Entry and Exit Permit on arrival, the applicants are required to pay a processing fee of NT$600. The processing time is 5 business days.[9] These visitors are required to hold their Hong Kong Permanent Identity Cards or Macau Permanent Resident Identity Cards, as well as their proof of previous visits to Taiwan, when applying for Exit and Entry Permits on arrival or the no-fee Entry Permits for subsequent visits.

Since 1 January 2017, Hong Kong and Macau residents are able to apply for double-entry Entry Permits online, providing that they are entering Taiwan by cruise for at least one portion of their trip.[10]

eVisa[edit]

Since January 12, 2016, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of ROC started to implement the eVisa Program. Citizens of the following countries can apply for a single-entry eVisa to visit Taiwan for less than 30 days. The fee for each application is NT$1,632.[11][12] On 7 October 2016, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of ROC further expanded the list of countries eligible to apply for eVisa.[13]

* - also eligible for visa on arrival.
** - until 6 October 2018.

Nationals of the following countries may apply for a single-entry eVisa for a maximum stay of 30 days if they are travelling with an approved tour group:[14]

Also, all foreign nationals except Chinese nationals who are invited by the Taiwanese government to attend international conferences, sports events, trade fairs or other activities organized, co-organized or sponsored by Taiwanese government agencies or certain NGOs are also eligible for an eVisa. Such applicants must obtain an e-code from their host organizations in Taiwan prior to applying for an eVisa.[15]

APEC Business Travel Card[edit]

Holders of passports issued by the following countries who possess an APEC Business Travel Card (ABTC) containing the code "TWN" on the back of the card can enter Taiwan visa-free for business trips for up to 90 days.[1] ABTCs are issued to nationals of:[16]

ABTCs are also issued to nationals of China and permanent residents of Hong Kong, however Chinese nationals residing in Mainland China are subject to entry restrictions and cannot use the card to enter Taiwan. Chinese nationals permanently residing in Hong Kong are also ineligible and are required to obtain an Exit and Entry Permit.

Online Travel Authorization Certificate[edit]

Nationals of the following countries can apply for a no-fee Travel Authorization Certificate online for multiple visits to Taiwan, for a duration of no more than 30 days each visit during the certificate's 90-day validity period, if they have never been employed as a guest worker to Taiwan and have met the additional requirements listed below:[17]

They are required to hold a residential or visitor visa (including Visa Waiver Registration Certificates issued by Japan to Indonesian nationals, and e-Visas), or a residential certificate (including permanent residency) issued by the following countries. The visa can be either valid or expired, but it must not have expired for more than 10 years prior to the date of arrival in Taiwan. Holders of work permits are not eligible. In addition, travelers utilizing the scheme must also hold a return or onward plane or ship ticket and will be required to present it to the immigration officer.[18]

Frequent visitors to Taiwan from these countries can also receive multiple entry visas with validity of two to five years.[19]

Nationals of the People's Republic of China who are Mainland residents[edit]

Nationals of the People's Republic of China with residency (hukou) in Mainland China (including those who are non-permanent residents of Hong Kong or Macau and have relinquished their hukou in Mainland China) require prior approvals from Taiwanese government and are required to hold an Exit and Entry Permit prior to travelling to Taiwan.[20] As of August 2016, Mainland residents can only visit Taiwan as a part of a pre-approved tour group unless they qualify for one of the exemptions:

  • They have hukou in one of the 47 cities that are designated by the Taiwanese and Chinese authorities as eligible for individual tours;[21]
  • They reside outside Mainland China and hold temporary or permanent residence status in Hong Kong, Macau or a third country (prior approval from the Chinese authorities is not required when departing from a place other than Mainland China);[22] or,
  • They only visit Quemoy, Matsu and Penghu Islands (in which case a 15-day Exit and Entry Permit Permit can be obtained on arrival provided holding certain travel documents) and will not proceed to other parts of Taiwan.[23]

As of May 2016, Mainland resident visitors applying from Mainland China are subject to a daily quota imposed by Taiwan of 14,600 persons per day, with half of the quota available to individual tour applicants. Those who applied from Hong Kong, Macau or a third country are not subject to a quota.[24] It was reported that the Chinese authorities also has an unofficial "soft cap" on the numbers of individual and group tourists, ranging from 40% to 50% of the Taiwanese quota.[25]

All PRC nationals who are residents of Mainland China cannot travel to Taiwan on their passports when departing from Mainland China and must hold a Travel Permit to and from Taiwan (往來台灣通行證), colloquially known as Mainland Resident Travel Permit (大通證), issued by the Chinese authorities. The permit is a pink, passport-like travel document, and it must be used along with the appropriate exit endorsements (similar to exit visas).[20] Although travelling with the Mainland Resident Travel Permit is not mandatory when departing from Hong Kong, Macau or a third country, the Exit and Entry Permit itself is not a travel document but a de facto entry visa, and is usually tied to the document number of Mainland Resident Travel Permit or the Chinese passport, hence the travelers are still required to carry the travel document they used to apply for the Exit and Entry Permit when travelling to Taiwan.[26]

Since January 2016, Mainland residents are no longer required to hold a Mainland Resident Travel Permit if they depart from airports in Chongqing, Kunming or Nanchang and are only in transit through Taiwan to a third country. Otherwise, the Mainland Resident Travel Permit with exit endorsement is also required for transit through Taiwan if departing from Mainland China, but the Exit and Entry Permit is not required if the passengers do not pass immigration control in Taiwan and only remain airside.[27]

Restrictions for former nationals of People's Republic of China who were Mainland residents[edit]

Although the aforementioned restrictions do not apply to former nationals of People's Republic of China with Mainland residency, they also face entry restrictions and are required to apply for a visa unless they meet the following requirements:[1]

  • They have resided outside of PRC for more than 4 years;
  • They have obtained the nationality of the country in which they reside in; and
  • They have lost their PRC nationality in pursuant to Article 9 of the Chinese nationality law.

If the requirements are met, they may enter Taiwan according to the visa requirements of the nationality they have acquired. However, documentations supporting the change in nationality, such as a naturalization certificate, is required.

Working Holiday Visa[edit]

Nationals of the following countries are eligible to apply for the Taiwanese working holiday visa (named as "Youth Mobility Scheme" for British and Canadian citizens) through Taiwanese diplomatic missions of their countries of nationality, if they are ordinary residents in their country of nationality and are within the age limits:[28][29][30]

1 - for British citizens residing in United Kingdom only.[31]

Statistics[edit]

Most visitors arriving to Taiwan on short term basis were from the following countries of residence:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ For British passport holders, only British citizens enjoy visa-free entry.
  2. ^ a b Holders of diplomatic and official passports are not eligible.
  3. ^ Under the Laws and Regulations Regarding Hong Kong & Macao Affairs, BN(O)s, regardless of ethnicity, are not treated as British nationals, but permanent residents of Hong Kong and Macau.
  1. ^ a b c d "Information - Chinese Taipei". Timatic. IATA. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Visa-Exempt Entry Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Republic of China.
  3. ^ "Taiwan grants visa-free treatment for Andorra, San Marino citizens - Politics - FOCUS TAIWAN - CNA ENGLISH NEWS". 
  4. ^ Notice for British Passport Holders Who Entered Taiwan Visa-Free and Are Applying for an Extension of Stay Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Republic of China.
  5. ^ a b "積極推動新南向政策 林揆拍板:泰國、汶萊旅客免簽". Executive Yuan (in Chinese). Retrieved 15 July 2016. 
  6. ^ "12月1日起 可停留30天 汶永久居民赴台免签证". 
  7. ^ a b c "Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs - Landing Visas". 
  8. ^ "Laws & Regulations Database and The Republic of China". 
  9. ^ "香港、澳門永久居民申請入出境證". Bureau of Hong Kong Affairs. 2 June 2015. 
  10. ^ "中央網路報-兩岸交流". 
  11. ^ "Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs - MOFA launches eVisa Program January 12". 
  12. ^ "Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs - eVisa". 
  13. ^ "Taiwan includes nine more countries in e-visa program - Politics - FOCUS TAIWAN - CNA ENGLISH NEWS". 
  14. ^ "外交部進一步放寬東協國家國民來臺簽證措施 - 外交部領事事務局全球資訊網". 
  15. ^ R.O.C.(Taiwan) launches the eVisa Program on Jan. 12, 2016
  16. ^ "ABTC Summary - APEC Business Travel Card". 
  17. ^ "Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs - Online Application for R.O.C. (Taiwan) Travel Authorization Certificate (Applicable to citizens of India, Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos)". 
  18. ^ "Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs - Amend Online Application for R.O.C. (Taiwan) Travel Authorization Certificate (Applicable to citizens of India, Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos)". 
  19. ^ 中央通訊社. "行政院拍板 簡化東協8國訪台簽證 - 重點新聞 - 中央社即時新聞 CNA NEWS". 
  20. ^ a b 办理台湾自由行需知及台湾自由行个人注意事项
  21. ^ 大陸地區人民來臺從事個人旅遊觀光活動線上申請須知
  22. ^ 大陸地區人民自國外或香港澳門來臺從事觀光活動線上申請須知
  23. ^ 內政部入出國及移民署 (16 December 2014). "公告大陸地區人民以旅行事由於入境金門、馬祖、澎湖時向內政部入出國及移民署申請發給臨時入境停留通知單,其適用對象、限制方式、人數及應備文件,自中華民國104年1月1日生效。". 
  24. ^ 中時電子報. "陸客自由行少65% 打趴台觀光業". 
  25. ^ 中時電子報. "急凍!農曆年後 陸客再減半". 
  26. ^ "大陸人士 - 申辦「觀光」須知". 
  27. ^ "首批赴台中转大陆游客今日抵达台湾转机". Sohu. Xinhua News Agency. 
  28. ^ "Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs - Working Holiday (Youth Mobility) Scheme". 
  29. ^ "Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs - Qualifications for Visa Applicants". 
  30. ^ "中華民國國民申請其他國家「度假打工(青年交流)簽證」參考資料 - 外交部領事事務局全球資訊網". 
  31. ^ "Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs - Youth Mobility (The United Kingdom)". 
  32. ^ Visitor Arrivals, 2013-2016
  33. ^ "Tourism Bureau, M.O.T.C. Republic of China (Taiwan) Visitor Arrivals by Residence". admin.taiwan.net.tw. Retrieved 2017-01-31. 

External links[edit]