Viscount Knollys

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Viscountcy Knollys
Coronet of a British Viscount.svg
Arms of Knollys, Viscount Knollys.svg
Per pale gules and argent a chevron counterchanged and charged with three roses, also counterchanged, barbed and seeded proper
Creation date4 July 1911[1]
MonarchGeorge V
PeeragePeerage of the United Kingdom
First holderFrancis Knollys, 1st Baron Knollys
Present holderDavid Knollys, 3rd Viscount Knollys
Heir apparentHon. Patrick Knollys
Remainder toHeirs male of the first viscount's body lawfully begotten
Seat(s)Bramerton Grange
MottoIn utrumque paratus ("Ready for both")
Francis Knollys,
1st Viscount Knollys

Viscount Knollys, of Caversham in the County of Oxford, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1911 for the court official Francis Knollys, 1st Baron Knollys, Private Secretary to the Sovereign from 1901 to 1913. He had been previously created Baron Knollys, of Caversham in the County of Oxford, on 21 July 1902.[2] His son, the second Viscount, served as Governor of Bermuda. As of 2012 the titles are held by the latter's son, the third Viscount, who succeeded in 1966. The third Viscountess Knollys is a sister of Baron Farnham: she served as Vice Lord-Lieutenant of Norfolk.[3]

The Viscounts Knollys are members of the prominent Knollys family (pronounced "Noles") and are descended in the senior male line from William Knollys, 1st Earl of Banbury. This earldom is considered to have become extinct on the first Earl's death but the extinction has been contested up to the present day. For more information on this, see the Earl of Banbury.[1]

The family seat is Bramerton Grange, near Norwich, Norfolk.[4]

Viscounts Knollys (1911)[edit]

Line of succession[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Mosley, Charles, ed. (2003). Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knighthood (107 ed.). Burke's Peerage & Gentry. pp. 2211–2212. ISBN 0-9711966-2-1.
  2. ^ "No. 27455". The London Gazette. 18 July 1902. p. 4587.
  3. ^ "New county role for Lady Romney revealed". Lynn News.
  4. ^ Montague-Smith, Patrick W. (1980). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage: with Her Majesty's Royal Warrant Holders 1980. Debrett's Peerage. p. 456. ISBN 9780905649207. Retrieved 4 July 2017.

External links[edit]