Vladimír Růžička

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For the Czech hockey player born in 1989, see Vladimír Růžička (ice hockey, born 1989).
Vladimír Růžička
Vladimír Růžička.jpg
Born (1963-06-06) June 6, 1963 (age 52)
Most, TCH
Height 6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight 210 lb (95 kg; 15 st 0 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Left
Played for CHZ Litvínov
HK Dukla Trenčín
Edmonton Oilers
Boston Bruins
Ottawa Senators
HC Slavia Praha
National team  Czechoslovakia 
 Czech Republic
NHL Draft 73rd overall, 1982
Toronto Maple Leafs
Playing career 1979–2000

Vladimír Růžička (Czech pronunciation: [ˈvlaɟɪmiːr ˈruːʒɪtʃka]; born June 6, 1963)[1] is a Czech ice hockey coach and former professional player. Růžička was twice named the top player in the Czechoslovak Elite League, and was on the gold medal team in the Ice Hockey World Championship in 1985 and 1998 Olympic Games. He also played 233 games in the National Hockey League (NHL). Since 2008, Růžička has been the head coach of both HC Slavia Praha and the Czech national ice hockey team.

Playing career[edit]

Růžička started his career with Czechoslovak side Litvínov, making his first appearance at the age of 16 and scoring after just 10 seconds in his first game, against Dukla Jihlava.[2] Růžička was selected by the Toronto Maple Leafs 73rd overall in the 1982 NHL Entry Draft. Despite this, he was barred from leaving Czechoslovakia by the Communist authorities.[2] He continued to play internationally for Czechoslovakia before finally making his NHL debut in 1989.[2] Růžička had a short career in the NHL, playing a total of five seasons for the Edmonton Oilers, Boston Bruins and Ottawa Senators. His best season statistically came in 1991–92 when he recorded 75 points (39 goals, 36 assists) with Boston, and led the team in scoring.[2] He has a Stanley Cup ring and is on the 1990 Edmonton Oilers Stanley Cup team picture. However, Růžička only played 25 regular season games and did not appear in the playoffs that season. Thus, his name was not engraved on the Stanley Cup. Růžička finished his NHL career with 233 games, scoring 82 goals and 85 assists.[2]

Růžička played 200 games for his national team, scoring 112 goals in the process.[2] In 1985 he won a gold medal with Czechoslovakia at the 1985 World Ice Hockey Championships.[2] He captained the gold medal winning Czech Republic team at the 1998 Winter Olympics, going on to retire from the international team after the tournament.[2]

Awards[edit]

Medal record
Competitor for  Czechoslovakia
Men's ice hockey
European Junior Championships
Gold medal – first place 1979 Poland
Silver medal – second place 1981 Soviet Union
World Junior Championships
Silver medal – second place 1982 United States
Silver medal – second place 1983 Soviet Union
World Championships
Gold medal – first place 1985 Czechoslovakia
Silver medal – second place 1983 West Germany
Bronze medal – third place 1987 Austria
Bronze medal – third place 1989 Sweden
Olympic Games
Silver medal – second place 1984 Sarajevo
Competitor for  Czech Republic
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1998 Nagano

Coaching career[edit]

After retiring as a player in 2000 he started working as a coach in HC Slavia Praha and in 2002–03 and 2007–08 seasons his team won the Czech Extraliga. Between 2002–2004 he was also an assistant coach of the Czech national ice hockey team. Shortly after he left the team, the head coach Ivan Hlinka died and Růžička took over the position, leading the Czech Republic team to the Vienna World Championship gold medal in 2005. Růžička has coached the Czech national ice hockey team to two gold medals.[3][4][5]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1977–78 CHZ Litvínov Jr. TCH-Jr.
1978–79 CHZ Litvínov Jr. TCH-Jr.
1979–80 CHZ Litvínov TCH 9 1 1 2 0
1980–81 CHZ Litvínov TCH 41 12 13 25 10
1981–82 CHZ Litvínov TCH 44 27 22 49 50
1982–83 CHZ Litvínov TCH 43 22 24 46 40
1983–84 CHZ Litvínov TCH 44 31 23 54 50
1984–85 CHZ Litvínov TCH 41 38 22 60 29
1985–86 CHZ Litvínov TCH 44 41 32 73
1986–87 CHZ Litvínov TCH 39 29 21 50 46
1987–88 HK Dukla Trenčín TCH 44 38 27 65 70
1988–89 HK Dukla Trenčín TCH 45 46 38 84 42
1989–90 Edmonton Oilers NHL 25 11 6 17 10
1989–90 CHZ Litvínov TCH 32 21 23 44
1990–91 Boston Bruins NHL 29 8 8 16 19 17 2 11 13 0
1991–92 Boston Bruins NHL 77 39 36 75 48 13 2 3 5 2
1992–93 Boston Bruins NHL 60 19 22 41 38
1993–94 Ottawa Senators NHL 42 5 13 18 14
1994–95 HC Slavia Praha CZE 41 27 24 51 3 2 0 2
1995–96 HC Slavia Praha CZE 37 21 44 65 5 2 1 3
1996–97 HC Slavia Praha CZE 44 22 32 54 40
1997–98 HC Slavia Praha CZE 49 20 40 60 60 5 0 6 6 6
1998–99 HC Slavia Praha CZE 50 25 31 56 67
1999–2000 HC Slavia Praha CZE 21 5 8 13 16
CZE totals 242 120 179 299 183 13 4 7 11 6
NHL totals 233 82 85 167 129 30 4 14 18 2
TCH totals 425 306 246 552 337

International[edit]

Year Team Event   GP G A Pts PIM
1979 Czechoslovakia EJC 3 1 2 3 2
1981 Czechoslovakia WJC 5 5 0 5 2
1981 Czechoslovakia EJC 5 8 8 16 18
1982 Czechoslovakia WJC 7 8 1 9 6
1983 Czechoslovakia WJC 7 12 8 20 6
1983 Czechoslovakia WC 10 3 1 4 4
1984 Czechoslovakia OLY 7 4 6 10 0
1984 Czechoslovakia CC 5 0 0 0 2
1985 Czechoslovakia WC 10 8 3 11 0
1986 Czechoslovakia WC 10 4 11 15 6
1987 Czechoslovakia WC 10 3 3 6 10
1987 Czechoslovakia CC 6 2 0 2 0
1988 Czechoslovakia OLY 8 4 3 7 12
1989 Czechoslovakia WC 10 7 7 14 2
1998 Czech Republic OLY 6 3 0 3 0
Junior totals 27 34 19 53 34
Senior totals 82 38 34 72 36

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Vladimír Růžička". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2015-06-19. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Bouc, František (12 January 2000). "Passing the puck". Prague Post. Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  3. ^ "Czechs eager to rejoin elite". IIHF.com. International Ice Hockey Federation. 
  4. ^ "Czechs are champs!". IIHF.com. International Ice Hockey Federation. 
  5. ^ "Alois Hadamczik set to return as Czech coach". Yahoo.com. [dead link]

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Dominik Hašek
Jiří Králík
Czechoslovak Golden Hockey Stick
1988
1986
Succeeded by
Dominik Hašek
Dominik Hašek