Vladimir Antoshin

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This name uses Eastern Slavic naming customs; the patronymic is Sergeyevich and the family name is Antoshin.

Vladimir Sergeyevich Antoshin (Владимир Сергеевич Антошин; 14 May 1929 in Moscow - 13 May 1994) was a Soviet chess Grandmaster, a theoretician and a national champion of correspondence chess.

Student Olympiad performances[edit]

As a young man, he was a high achiever, principally as part of the USSR's highly successful Student Olympiad team of 1954-56. The team won the silver medal at the first ever Student Olympiad in Oslo 1954 and then took gold medals at Lyons 1955 and at Uppsala 1956. His best performance probably occurred at Lyons, as the strength of the competition was far greater than at Oslo. Playing below world-class grandmasters Mark Taimanov and Boris Spassky, but above Alexey Suetin, his endeavors also earned him an individual gold medal for best score on board three. In all, he accumulated three gold and one silver medal, for a total score of 16/19.[1][2]

During this period of his career, FIDE awarded him the International Master title (1963) and the Grandmaster title (1964).[3]

Later career[edit]

Making a limited number of international tournament appearances, he was successful at Ulan Bator (1965) and Zinnowitz (1966). The latter was probably his finest moment, scoring +8, =6, -1, to take first place among reasonably strong opposition, including Victor Ciocaltea and Wolfgang Uhlmann.[4][5]

Aside from Zinnowitz, Hartston notes that Antoshin's over-the-board results were never outstanding.[6] His other results were nevertheless respectable; 2nd at Kienbaum (Berlin) 1959 (Uhlmann won), 5th at Moscow 1960 (ahead of Polugaevsky, Hort and Uhlmann), 4th at Sochi 1963, 4th at Moscow 1963 (ahead of Keres, Liberzon, Szabó and Hort), 6th= at Sochi 1964, 2nd at Venice 1966 (Ivkov won) and 4th at Havana 1968 (The Capablanca Memorial). He regularly played at Sochi, but finished lower on other occasions.

His tournament appearances were less frequent in the 1970s. He did however share 3rd place at Sarajevo in 1970 and placed runner-up at Frunze in 1979.

A major reason for his limited progress as a player was his continued amateur status. He became a tournament organiser and trainer to the USSR Olympiad team,[7] maintained a second career as a technical designer, and according to Cafferty & Taimanov, was also supposed to have strong links with the KGB.[8] As a further distraction, he chose to play correspondence chess throughout the 1950s, although this notably culminated in him winning the USSR Correspondence Championship in 1960.

At the Soviet Championship, he had moderate results, participating in 1955, 1956, 1957, 1967 and 1970. His highest placing was a share of sixth in 1967.[9]

Theory[edit]

Antoshin is the eponym of two opening lines, one occurring in the Philidor Defence and the other in the Dutch Defence.

Philidor Defence[edit]

a b c d e f g h
8
Chessboard480.svg
a8 black rook
b8 black knight
c8 black bishop
d8 black queen
e8 black king
h8 black rook
a7 black pawn
b7 black pawn
c7 black pawn
e7 black bishop
f7 black pawn
g7 black pawn
h7 black pawn
d6 black pawn
f6 black knight
d4 white knight
e4 white pawn
c3 white knight
a2 white pawn
b2 white pawn
c2 white pawn
f2 white pawn
g2 white pawn
h2 white pawn
a1 white rook
c1 white bishop
d1 white queen
e1 white king
f1 white bishop
h1 white rook
8
7 7
6 6
5 5
4 4
3 3
2 2
1 1
a b c d e f g h
Antoshin Variation, Philidor Defence after 5...Be7

In the Antoshin Variation, Black chooses to exchange central pawns and head for simple, rapid development of the kingside. After ... 0-0 and ... Re8, Black's cramped dark-square bishop is often reactivated by playing it to g7 via f8. Play commences,

1.e4 e5
2.Nf3 d6
3.d4 exd4
4.Nxd4 Nf6
5.Nc3 Be7 (diag.)

and White usually chooses to develop one of his bishops, for example:

6.Bf4 0-0
7.Qd2 c6
8.0-0-0 b5
9.f3 b4
10.Nb1! Qb6
11.g4 d5

with a small advantage to White (Emms) in Hyldkrog-Jensen, corr., 1984.[10] The opening remains fully playable however, with modern-day proponents including Lev Aronian, Étienne Bacrot and Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu.

Dutch Defence[edit]

a b c d e f g h
8
Chessboard480.svg
a8 black rook
b8 black knight
c8 black bishop
e8 black king
f8 black bishop
h8 black rook
a7 black pawn
b7 black pawn
c7 black queen
e7 black pawn
g7 black pawn
h7 black pawn
c6 black pawn
d6 black pawn
f6 black knight
f5 black pawn
c4 white pawn
d4 white pawn
c3 white knight
g3 white pawn
a2 white pawn
b2 white pawn
e2 white pawn
f2 white pawn
g2 white bishop
h2 white pawn
a1 white rook
c1 white bishop
d1 white queen
e1 white king
g1 white knight
h1 white rook
8
7 7
6 6
5 5
4 4
3 3
2 2
1 1
a b c d e f g h
Hort-Antoshin Variation, Dutch Defence after 5...Qc7

The Hort-Antoshin Variation was first discovered by Vlastimil Hort in 1960, when he was just sixteen; it was then further developed by Antoshin and consequently carries the names of both players. Black's idea is to omit the 'normal' e6 move and prepare a central break with e5 instead. The line may also be used with 'colours reversed' as a variant of Bird's Opening, where of course White is a move up. Play starts,

1.d4 f5
2.g3 Nf6
3.Bg2 d6
4.c4 (Burgess gives the more modern alternative 4.Nc3 c6 5.e4 fxe4 6.Nxe4 Nxe4 7.Bxe4 Bf5 8.Qf3 Bxe4 9.Qxe4 Qa5+ 10.c3 as favouring White in Khenkin-Vasiukov, Voskresensk 1990)[11]

4. ... c6
5.Nc3 Qc7 (diag.)

whereupon, one possible continuation is the direct:

6.e4 e5
7.dxe5 dxe5
8.exf5 Bxf5
9.Nf3 Nbd7
10.0-0 0-0-0

which ended in an early draw in Minev-Hort, Moscow 1960.

Notable game[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kazić, Bozidar M. (1974). International Championship Chess. Batsford. pp. 135–149. ISBN 0-7134-2795-7. 
  2. ^ Olimpbase record for Vladimir Antoshin
  3. ^ Gaige, Jeremy (1987). Chess Personalia, A Biobibliography. McFarland. p. 12. ISBN 0-7864-2353-6. 
  4. ^ Hooper, David and Whyld, Kenneth (1984). The Oxford Companion To Chess. Oxford University. p. 15. ISBN 0-19-217540-8. 
  5. ^ Sunnucks, Anne (1970). The Encyclopaedia of Chess. Hale. p. 490. ISBN 0-7091-1030-8. 
  6. ^ Golombek, Harry, ed. (1981). The Penguin Encyclopaedia of Chess. Penguin Books. ISBN 978-0-14-046452-8. 
  7. ^ British Chess Magazine - Vol 99, October 1979, p. 463
  8. ^ Cafferty, Bernard and Taimanov, Mark (1998). The Soviet Championships. Cadogan Chess. p. 92. ISBN 1-85744-201-6. 
  9. ^ Cafferty, Bernard and Taimanov, Mark (1998). The Soviet Championships. Cadogan Chess. p. 137. ISBN 1-85744-201-6. 
  10. ^ Nunn, John; et al. (1999). Nunn's Chess Openings. Everyman Chess/Gambit. p. 298. ISBN 1-85744-221-0. 
  11. ^ Nunn, John; et al. (1999). Nunn's Chess Openings. Everyman Chess/Gambit. p. 110. ISBN 1-85744-221-0. 

External links[edit]