Vladimir Heavy Draft

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Vladimir Heavy Draft
RussianStamp051.07.jpg
Vladimir Heavy Draft on a Russian stamp
Country of origin Russia

The Vladimir Heavy Draft is a breed of draft horse which comes from Vladimir, in the former USSR, in Russia. It is a strong horse that is an all-around draft horse of medium size.

Breed characteristics[edit]

The Vladimir Heavy Draught Horse is the heaviest and most substantial of all Russian horse breeds. Males weigh up to 1,688 pounds (766 kg) and mares weigh up to 1,507 pounds (684 kg) with height averaging 17.1 hands (69 inches, 175 cm) and mares 16.1 hands (65 inches, 165 cm).[1]

The head is large and long, with a Roman nose. The neck is strong and long. The back, although broad, can be weak. The croup is long, with a definite slope. The limbs are strong and feathered. Bay is its most common colour, but some can be black and chestnut; white markings may also be seen on the face and legs.[2]

The Vladimir Heavy Draught Horse is considered to be docile in nature, insinuating a calm and easy to handle horse. Despite this, the Vladimir Heavy Draught Horse still retains an active gait, which is highly likely to be a characteristic from the Clydesdale input into the breed.[3]

History[edit]

This horse was developed in the province after which it is named at the turn of the 20th century. Today, its breeding is widerspread. The imported foundation stock was mainly British, consisting of the Suffolk Punch, Clydesdale and Shire horse. Some Ardennes and Percheron were also used. In 1946, the Vladimir Heavy Draft was found to be breeding sufficiently true to type to consider it a true breed. This quick-maturing, strong, heavy horse is popular for draft work. It is also used for pulling troika sleighs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Draper, Judith. Horse Breeds of the World. Sebastian Kelly. pp. 102–103. ISBN 1-84081-060-2. 
  2. ^ Draper, Judith. Horse Breeds of the World. Sebastian Kelly. pp. 102–103. ISBN 1-84081-060-2. 
  3. ^ Draper, Judith. Horse Breeds of the World. Sebastian Kelly. pp. 102–103. ISBN 1-84081-060-2.