Vladimir Yakovlev (journalist)

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Vladimir Yakovlev
Born Владимир Егорович Яковлев
(1959-03-08) March 8, 1959 (age 58)
Moscow, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union
Nationality Russian
Alma mater Lomonosov Moscow State University
Children son[1]
Parent(s) Egor Vladimirovich Yakovlev

Vladimir Egorovich Yakovlev (Russian: Владимир Егорович Яковлев, born March 8, 1959)[2] is a founder and an editor-in-chief of the Kommersant Newspaper, the first Russian daily business-oriented newspaper.[3][4][5] He is a former CEO and owner of Kommersant Publishing house.[6][7][8][9][9] Yakovlev is considered to be one of the creators of the Post-Soviet format of Russian journalism.[10]

Biography[edit]

Early life and career[edit]

Vladimir was born into the family of the famous Soviet journalist Egor Vladimirovich Yakovlev.[1]

He graduated from the International Division of the School of Journalism of Lomonosov Moscow State University.[1]

Yakovlev was placed on a job in the Newspaper Soviet Russia. He then went on to work in the Magazine Rabotnitsa, the Sobesednik Weekly.[1] Up to 1988 Yakovlev was a correspondent of Ogoniok Magazine.[11][7][12]

Since June 15, 1988 Yakovlev was a founder and a president of Fakt informational cooperative society[1][11][7][13] (it was created in cooperation with Gleb Pavlovsky). Originally, the organization was created in the format of an information and reference service in order to “provide its potential readers – members of the booming cooperative movement – with facts: contact details, references, texts of regulatory acts and documents”.[14]

In 1989 at the suggestion of the vice-president of Fakt, the USSR cooperators’ union, Artem Tarasov[15] Yakovlev together with Gleb Pavlovsky started an independent news agency and newspaper Kommersant.[16][17] The pilot issue of the weekly newspaper was in December 1989.[11]

From 1989 up to 1999 Yakovlev was the owner and editor-in-chief of Kommersant Newspaper, which was the basis of the homonymous publishing house.[18] Since 1992 Yakovlev, being the majority shareholder, took up a post as CEO of Kommersant Joint-Stock Company (up to 1992 Vladimir was the editor-in-chief of the newspaper).[15]

Simultaneously, Yakovlev was engaged in various projects such as Domovoy Magazine, together with V. D. Drannikov, a famous journalist, but none became as famous as Kommersant.

In 1999 the majority of shares of Kommersant publishing house were purchased by Boris Berezovsky[19][8][20] and Badri Patarkatsishvili through the American Capital Group.[8][21] Kommersant Newspaper, Dengi, Vlast, Ogoniok, Autopilot, Sekret Firmy, Weekend, Citizen K. Magazines, Kommersant FM Radio station and Kommersant TV Channel were among the assets of the publishing group.[22]

After Kommersant[edit]

In 2007 Yakovlev became the CEO of Stream Continent Company, which was a content agency for cable television (an affiliate of Sistema Analytical finance company,[23] currently Stream Channel Joint-Stock Company).[1][24]

Since 2007 Yakovlev was a member of the board of directors of Sistemy massmedia, an affiliate of Sistema Analytical finance company, and in the same year he founded Content bureau.[1]

In 2008 together with Mikhail Prokhorov he created Zhivi! Media group.[25][3][26][27] The goal of the company was “launching and managing innovative media projects”.[28] Vladimir Yakovlev’s Content bureau LLC was a parent company,[29] while ONEXIM company had 90% of the shares.[28] The main projects of the company was Zhivi! (a project promoting a healthy lifestyle), including a homonymous channel, web-site and club; F5 (a newspaper and a web-site), Russian Pioneer Magazine[30] and Snob Magazine (a project invented by Yakovlev[31]). In 2009-2010 Snob expanded to the UK and USA[32] with availability via Barnes & Noble and regional hubs. Prokhorov invested $150 million in the launch of the magazine and website targeting highly paid professionals.[31][33][34]

At the end of 2011, Yakovlev stepped down as an editor-in-chief of the Snob project and president of the Zhivi! Media group.[35][36][37][38][1] Nikolai Uskov (Russian GQ) became the head of the company.[39]

In 2010, Yakovlev signed an open letter to the President of the Russian Federation asking for the quickest solving of crimes against journalists.[40][41] Editors-in-chief of Novaya Gazeta, Forbes.ru, Russkiy Reporter and others also signed the open letter.

In 2011, Yakovlev officially came down on the side of journalist Maxim Kovalskiy. According to Yakovlev, the journalist was fired for writing an article “which the government wouldn’t have liked”.[42][43][44]

In May 2012, Yakovlev started a new project called The age of happiness. It is dedicated to active ageing and is bilingual (Russian/English) [45]

Legacy[edit]

Yakovlev is thought to be the author of New Russians[33] and Global Russians[46][47] clichés.

Yakovlev is one of the Perestroika publicists who created "russian newspeak" of the 90’s:[48]

«This new generation – mostly the children of the men of the 60’s such as Vladimir Yakovlev, Artyom Borovik, Dmitry Lihanov, Eugene Dodolev, Alexaner Lyubimov – are already taking their course. Being those of the gilded youth, having been brought up in huge apartments or having spent their childhood abroad, having graduated from the international division of the School of Journalism of Moscow State University, they now make a difference on the television and mass-media. The perfect takeoff and innate lack of fear allows them to remove taboos and visit all the hot spots where no Soviet journalist had been before»

Awards[edit]

Yakovlev received a letter of acknowledgement from the President of the Russian Federation on June 25, 1996 for active involvement of organization and conducting of the election company of the President of the Russian Federation in 1996.[49]

He is nominated man of the year in Journalism according to the Federation of Jewish Communities of Russia.[50]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Владимир Егорович Яковлев. Биографическая справка". 28 October 2011. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  2. ^ "Дни рождения". Kommersant.ru. 3 July 2012. p. 4. Retrieved 11 August 2017 – via Kommersant. 
  3. ^ a b [1][dead link]
  4. ^ "Telegraph". The Telegraph. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  5. ^ [2][dead link]
  6. ^ "Либо стареющий интеллигент утратил чувство меры, либо — шутка не удалась - Мнения - Известия". Izvestia.ru. 13 December 2011. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c [3][dead link]
  8. ^ a b c [4][dead link]
  9. ^ a b [5][dead link]
  10. ^ "От "Коммерсанта" до "Дождя"". Lenta.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  11. ^ a b c "Издательский дом "Коммерсантъ". Справка". Ria.ru. 13 December 2011. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  12. ^ [6][dead link]
  13. ^ "Baltic Weekend - Andrey Vasiliev". bprw.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  14. ^ "Из рук в руки". Lenta.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  15. ^ a b "Главные редакторы газеты "КоммерсантЪ-Daily"". Ria.ru. 25 June 2010. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  16. ^ [7][dead link]
  17. ^ "ИД «Коммерсантъ» возглавил Павел Филенков". Sostav.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  18. ^ [8][dead link]
  19. ^ "Asia Times: Kazakhstan suspends launches from Baikonur". Atimes.com. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  20. ^ [9][dead link]
  21. ^ [10][dead link]
  22. ^ [11][dead link]
  23. ^ [12][dead link]
  24. ^ [13][dead link]
  25. ^ [14][dead link]
  26. ^ Sputnik. "Profile: Mikhail Prokhorov". en.ria.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  27. ^ Dolnick, Sam. "Oligarchs and Absinthe Shots". City Room. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  28. ^ a b "Николай Усков пересядет в кресло "Сноба"". Kommersant.ru. 1 September 2012. Retrieved 11 August 2017 – via Kommersant. 
  29. ^ "Ежедневная деловая газета РБК - главные новости дня в России и в мире". Газета РБК. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  30. ^ "Телеканал «Дождь» прекратил переговоры с Михаилом Прохоровым". Sostav.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  31. ^ a b Adams, Russell (13 September 2010). "Russian Snob Lands in New York". Wsj.com. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  32. ^ [15][dead link]
  33. ^ a b "Klub Prokhorov". NYMag.com. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  34. ^ "Russian billionaire to set up magazine for snobs". Reuters.com. 23 April 2008. Retrieved 11 August 2017 – via Reuters. 
  35. ^ "Black Hole". The New Yorker. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  36. ^ Bercovici, Jeff (4 November 2010). "Tongue-Tied". Forbes.com. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  37. ^ ""Сноб" посвятил особый выпуск поколению 30-летних". Lenta.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  38. ^ Макутина, Мария (28 October 2011). ""Сноб" лишается главного". Kommersant.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017 – via Kommersant. 
  39. ^ "The Moscow Times — News, Business, Culture & Events". Sptimes.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  40. ^ "Еще один журналист избит в Подмосковье - Rusbase". Rb.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  41. ^ [16][dead link]
  42. ^ "Telegraph". The Telegraph. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  43. ^ ntv.ru. "Создателю «Коммерсанта» стыдно за Усманова". НТВ. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  44. ^ "Ковальский уволится из "Коммерсанта" по соглашению сторон". Lenta.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  45. ^ "Возраст счастья. Проект Владимира Яковлева". ageofhappiness.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  46. ^ "Владимир Яковлев: «Сноб» — это не шлягерная журналистика". Telekritika.ua. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  47. ^ "Глеб Павловский - Новости, статьи, видео - общественно-политический форум Политбюро". newsreaders.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  48. ^ "Энциклопедия отечественного кино". Russiancinema.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017. 
  49. ^ [17][dead link]
  50. ^ "Агентство Еврейских Новостей Главные новости". Aen.ru. Retrieved 11 August 2017.