VolkerWessels

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VolkerWessels N.V.
Naamloze vennootschap
IndustryConstruction, civil engineering
Founded1854
HeadquartersAmersfoort, Netherlands
Key people
Jan de Ruiter (CEO), J.H.M. (Jan) Hommen (Chairman of the supervisory board)
Revenue€5.714 billion (2017)[1]
Increase €191 million) (2017)[1]
Increase €151 million (2017)[1]
Number of employees
16,179 (2017)[1]
Websitewww.volkerwessels.com

Royal VolkerWessels Stevin N.V. is a major European construction services business with Dutch-based headquarters. It is privately owned by the Wessels Family (42.5%), CVC Capital Partners (42.5%) and management (15%).[2]

History[edit]

The company was founded by Adriaan Volker in Sliedrecht in 1854.[3] It merged with Stevin Groep to form Volker Stevin in 1978 and with Kondor Wessels in 1997 to form Volker Wessels Stevin.[3] It was rebranded VolkerWessels in 2002.[3]

Operations[edit]

The company is organised into the following divisions:[4]

  • Building and property development
  • Infrastructure
  • VolkerWessels UK
  • VolkerWessels Canada
  • Energy, infrastructure technology and telecoms
  • Supplies and marine services

Major projects[edit]

Major projects undertaken by the company include the Eastern Scheldt storm surge barrier completed in 1986,[5] the Gateshead Millennium Bridge completed in 2001[6] and the Euroborg soccer stadium for FC Groningen in Groningen completed in 2006.[7]

VolkerWessels is also involved in HS2 lot C1, working as part of joint venture, with main construction work to start in 2018/9.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Annual Report 2017". VolkerWessels. Retrieved 2018-04-19.
  2. ^ VolkerWessels: organisation
  3. ^ a b c VolkerWessels: history
  4. ^ VolkerWessels: Companies
  5. ^ Deltawerken Cooperation
  6. ^ Structurae database
  7. ^ 10 million euro orders for Olympic Stadium in Berlin and Euroborg Stadium in Groningen Archived 2010-12-28 at the Wayback Machine. Imtech, 8 April 2004
  8. ^ "HS2 contracts worth £6.6bn awarded by UK government". the Guardian. 17 July 2017. Retrieved 2017-10-13.

External links[edit]