Volturnus

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For the University of Maine-developed floating offshore wind turbine, see VolturnUS (floating wind turbine).

In Roman mythology, Volturnus was a god of the Tiber, and may have been the god of all rivers.[1] He had his own minor flamen, and a high priest, the Flamen Volturnalis.[2] His festival, Volturnalia, was held on August 27.[3]

Culture[edit]

Although he was originally an Etruscan god, his worship spread to Rome, and appears to have replaced or co-incided with the Roman god Tiber.[4][2]

History[edit]

Although originally popular enough to receive his own Flamen, he vanished into obscurity around the time of the late Roman Republic.[5]

Appearance[edit]

Volturnus was a man, who had long blonde hair.[6]

Family[edit]

Volturnus had at least two descendants, a daughter named Juturna, a grandchild named Fons. Fons was born of a love affair between Juturna and Janus, and was the god of spring water.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Campbell, Brian (2012). Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 141. ISBN 9780807869048. 
  2. ^ a b Forsythe, Gary (2006). A critical history of early Rome : from prehistory to the First Punic War. Berkeley: University of California Press. p. 118. ISBN 9780520249912. 
  3. ^ Bunson, Matthew (2002). Encyclopedia of the Roman empire. New York: Facts On File. p. 589. ISBN 9781438110271. 
  4. ^ Oswalt, Sabine G; Cottrell, Leonard (1969). Concise encyclopedia of Greek and Roman mythology. Glasgow: Collins. p. 299. ISBN 978-0695861094. 
  5. ^ Adkins, Lesley; Adkins, Roy A. (2004). Handbook to life in ancient Rome. New York: Facts On File. p. 306. ISBN 9780816074822. 
  6. ^ Campbell, Brian (2012). Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 124. ISBN 9780807869048. 
  7. ^ Wiseman, T.P. (2004). The myths of Rome. Great Britain: University of Exeter, UK. p. 162. ISBN 9780859897037.