Volunteer State Community College

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Volunteer State Community College
Students on the vol state campus.jpg
Students walk across Volunteer State Community College's main campus in Gallatin, Tennessee.
Established1971
PresidentDr. Jerry Faulkner
Students9,156 fall semester 2018 enrollment
Location, ,
36°21′45″N 86°29′50″W / 36.3624°N 86.4973°W / 36.3624; -86.4973Coordinates: 36°21′45″N 86°29′50″W / 36.3624°N 86.4973°W / 36.3624; -86.4973
Colors          Red and Blue
NicknamePioneers
Websitehttp://www.volstate.edu
Better version of vol state logo.jpg

Volunteer State Community College is a publicly supported two-year community college located in Gallatin, Tennessee and operated under the auspices of the Tennessee Board of Regents.

Vol State, as it is popularly known, serves the suburban Nashville community. The college is some 30 miles (48 km) to the northeast in the Nashville suburb of Gallatin. In total, Vol State serves 11 counties in northern Middle Tennessee: Clay, Jackson, Macon, Overton, Pickett, Putnam, Robertson, Smith, Sumner, Trousdale, and Wilson.

Vol State has five major divisions: Health Sciences, Humanities, Business and Technology, Social Science and Education, and Math and Science. Popular programs at the school include Radiologic Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Criminal Justice, Education, Pre-Nursing, and Communications. The college has a television studio, a radio station, and recording studios. It offers an Entertainment Media Production program and classes in recording, video production, web design and music business. Many students choose the university prep program General Studies which prepares them for transfer to four-year colleges and universities.

Vol State has a degree-granting center in Livingston, Tennessee. The college offers numerous courses at the Highland Crest higher education facility in Springfield, and the Cookeville Higher Education Center. Vol State also offers some third and fourth-year level college courses through arrangements with other institutions. Vol State offers classes in traditional, online and hybrid formats.

Student life[edit]

All four Vol State campuses have events and activities for students. These range from concerts and art shows to speakers and outdoor events. A list of current student organizations can be found at http://www.volstate.edu/StudentLife/Organizations.php The Student Government Association (SGA) is where students come together to discuss policy, funding, activities, and student participation throughout student life. Some of the student organizations outside of the SGA include Phi Theta Kappa Honors Society, Team Change, Spectrum, Artisan's Alliance, and more. If students want, they can work on the weekly student newspaper, The Settler, or participate in the award-winning student literary publication, "Pioneer Pen". Students can also work at the Vol State radio station, WVCP, where they can schedule as a weekly host and learn the best practices for being an announcer. Theater students produce several plays each year and the Music Department puts on showcases each semester that feature student artists and groups. The Music Department also produces a CD of student artists or groups to sell at each showcase. Students have free access to a fitness room in Gallatin with treadmills and workout machines.

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Degree and certificate programs[edit]

Vol State offers more than 100 programs of study. The college is fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the A.A. (associate of arts), A.S. (associate of science), A.A.S (associate of applied science), A.S.T (associate of science in teaching), and A.F.A (associate of fine arts) degrees. The college also offers numerous technical certificates in a variety of disciplines. Vol State participates in the state TN Promise and TN Reconnect programs, which, respectively, provide tuition-free classes for graduating high school seniors, and adult students who don't already have a college degree. It also offers some financial aid assistance for people with a degree who are considering pursuing a new degree.

Vol State at Livingston[edit]

Vol State at Livingston is a full service degree-granting location of Volunteer State Community College. The campus underwent a major multi-year construction project transforming the original building into a new facility. It features 15 classrooms with the latest teaching technology; ITV interactive television classroom, science-biology lab, computer lab, library, 18 faculty offices, administration offices, outdoor and indoor study areas. Several of the classrooms are prepared for Allied Health classes.

Vol State offers the associate of science and associate of applied science degrees at Livingston. Classes include general education, vocational and career development courses. They are scheduled during the day and evening. Formats include online and traditional classroom courses.

The Livingston campus is located at 113 Windle Community Road.

Vol State at Highland Crest[edit]

Vol State, along with Austin Peay State University, offers classes at the Highland Crest site in Springfield, Tennessee. This $4.4 million facility contains 25,000 square feet of space housing four classrooms, a multipurpose room, a science lab, an interactive television (ITV) classroom, a bookstore, a library, a learning support center, and ten faculty offices. Classes offered at this campus include general education requirements for most degree programs.

Highland Crest is located just off Highway 431 in Springfield, William Batson Parkway at 150 Laureate Avenue.

Vol State in Cookeville[edit]

Vol State offers classes at the Cookeville Higher Education Campus (CHEC). Classes include general education requirements for most degree programs. CHEC is a partnership with Tennessee Tech University, which also offers classes there. TCAT classes are also held at CHEC. CHEC is located at 1000 Neal Street in Cookeville.

Athletics[edit]

The athletic teams at Volunteer State Community College include Baseball, Men's Basketball, Women's Basketball, and Women's Fast Pitch Softball. The intercollegiate teams have been highly successful and nationally ranked. Vol State is a member of the Western Division of the Tennessee Junior and Community College Athletic Association. Vol State is also a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association Region VII.

Cincinnati Reds all-star pitcher Steve Delabar attended the school.

The Vol State baseball team went to the Junior College World Series twice, in 1994 and 1999. The softball team competed in the Division One NJCAA Softball Championship in 2011 and went to the final round in 2012.

History[edit]

The college was founded in 1971. The establishment of a state community college in Gallatin involved the cooperative work of many civic leaders and citizens of Sumner County, as well as State officials. A unified proposal for a college was presented to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission in Nashville on September 11, 1967. Upon the recommendation of State Education Commissioner J. H. Warf, Governor Buford Ellington presented the college legislation to the 1969 General Assembly, and it was adopted.

A 100 -acre tract of land on Nashville Pike was chosen for the new campus. The property was deeded to the State on December 4, 1969. The new college was named Volunteer State Community College, and this was approved by the Tennessee Board of Regents on July 2, 1970. Ground breaking ceremonies for the first four buildings were held on November 5, 1970. Classes began in October of 1971, initially held in an old hotel and churches in Gallatin.


April 7, 2006 Tornado[edit]

The college was damaged heavily in a tornado outbreak on April 7, 2006. Two buildings suffered direct hits from the twister, and more than 90 cars in the parking lots were damaged and destroyed. There were only minor injuries on campus. The Hal Reed Ramer Administration Building received major damage, including damage to the office of the President. Noble Caudill Hall suffered perhaps the worst damage, as much of the second floor on the south side of the building collapsed, and a large section of roofing above WVCP radio and the Wemyss Auditorium was ripped off and/or collapsed inward. Caudill Hall closed for more than a year and a half until repairs were completed. In all, eleven classrooms had to be relocated due to damage and 72 faculty and staff offices were moved. Volunteer State building coordinators and campus safety staff have been credited with helping to save lives on the day the tornado hit. They were honored in a ceremony at the school.

By spring of 2007, the Ramer building was fully occupied again, including a new home for the student radio station. The Caudill Building re-opened for classes on January 12, 2008. A major landscaping project was finished in spring 2008 marking the end of tornado repair.

Administration[edit]

  • Dr. Hal R. Ramer (founding president 1971-2004)
  • Dr. Warren Nichols (president 2004-2011)
  • Dr. Bruce Scism (interim 2011-2012)
  • Dr. Jerry Faulkner (2012-current)

See also[edit]

  • WVCP - campus radio station

References[edit]

External links[edit]