W.A.K.O. European Championships 2006 (Skopje)

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W.A.K.O. European Championships 2006 (Skopje)
Wako.jpg
The poster for W.A.K.O. European Championships 2006 (Skopje).
Information
Promotion W.A.K.O.
Date November 21 2006 (start)
November 26 2006 (end)
City Republic of Macedonia Skopje, Republic of Macedonia
Event chronology

W.A.K.O. European Championships 2006 (Lisbon) W.A.K.O. European Championships 2006 (Skopje) W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 (Belgrade)

W.A.K.O. European Championships 2006 in Skopje were the joint eighteenth European kickboxing championships held by the W.A.K.O. organization (the other event was held the previous month in Lisbon). It was the first event to be held in the country of Republic of Macedonia and was organized by the nation's kickboxing president Ljupčo Nedelkovski,[1] involving (mainly) amateur men and women from 31 countries across Europe.

There were three styles on offer at Skopje; Low-Kick, Thai-Boxing and Light-Contact. The other usual W.A.K.O. styles (Full/Semi Contact, Aero-Kickboxing and Musical Forms) were held at the earlier event in Lisbon. By the end of the championships Russia were easily the strongest country overall with a massive medals tally with Belarus came a distant second and Serbia not far behind in third place. The event was held in Skopje, Macedonia over six days, beginning on Tuesday 21 November and ending 26 November 2006.[2]

Participating Nations[edit]

There were around 31 nations from across Europe participating at the 2006 W.A.K.O. European Championships in Skopje including:[3]

           

Low-Kick[edit]

Similar to Full-Contact kickboxing, contestants in Low-Kick are allowed to kick and punch one another with full force, with the primary difference being that in Low-Kick they are also allowed to kick one another's legs, with matches typically won by decision or stoppage. As with other forms of amateur kickboxing, various head and body protection must be worn. More information on the style can be found at the W.A.K.O. website.[4] Both men and women took part in Low-Kick at Skopje, with the men having twelve weight divisions ranging from 51 kg/112.2 lbs to over 91 kg/+200.2 lbs, and then women having six ranging from 48 kg/105.6 lbs to 70 kg/154 lbs and unlike more recent W.A.K.O. championships (aside from Lisbon) some countries were allowed more than one athlete per weight division.

Notable winners in the category included Zurab Faroyan picking up his 4th gold medal in a row, which included winning in Full-Contact at the other European championships in Lisbon a month or so previously, while countryman Konstantin Sbytov picked up his 3rd gold medal. Other winners included multiple world champion Eduard Mammadov and Ibragim Tamazaev who had won at the last world championships in Agadir. Also in medal positions and more recognisable to western and international audiences were Michał Głogowski, Ludovic Millet and Mickael Lallemand who all won bronze medals. Russia continued her tradition of being the strongest nation in Low-Kick, easily dominating the medal positions with twelve gold, four silver and eight bronze.[5]

Men's Low-Kick Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Light Bantamweight -51 kg
details
Aleksandar Aleksandrov Russia Nijat Huseynov Azerbaijan Rasim Aliti Republic of Macedonia
Afanasiev Klimeni Russia
Bantamweight -54 kg
details
Jordan Vasilev Bulgaria Emil Karimov Azerbaijan Boban Marinkovic Serbia
Mokhmad Betmirzaev Russia
Featherweight -57 kg
details
Zurab Faroyan Russia Milos Anic Serbia Gabor Kiss Hungary
Mariusz Cieśliński Poland
Lightweight -60 kg
details
Eduard Mammadov Azerbaijan Dzianis Tselitsa Belarus Alikhan Chumaev Russia
Grigory Gorokhov Russia
Light Welterweight -63.5 kg
details
Artur Magadov Russia Ayoub Saidi Denmark Gleb Bozko Estonia
Kurbanali Akaev Russia
Welterweight -67 kg
details
Nikolai Shtakhanov Russia Evgeny Grechishkin Russia Venelin Iankov Bulgaria
Mickael Lallemand France
Light Middleweight -71 kg
details
Konstantin Sbytov Russia Milan Dragojlovic Serbia Michał Głogowski Poland
Ludovic Millet France
Middleweight -75 kg
details
Ibragim Tamazaev Russia Dragan Mićić Serbia Leszek Koltun Poland
Stelian Angelov Bulgaria
Light Heavyweight -81 kg
details
Nenad Pagonis Serbia Drazenko Ninic Bosnia and Herzegovina Rail Rajabov Azerbaijan
Teppo Laine Finland
Cruiserweight -86 kg
details
Kirill Ivanov Russia Stipe Stipetic Croatia Dilian Slavov Bulgaria
Vladimir Djordjevic Serbia
Heavyweight -91 kg
details
Dimitri Antonenko Russia Dejan Milosavljevic Serbia Sasa Cirovic Serbia
Ivan Stanić Croatia
Super Heavyweight +91 kg
details
Dragan Jovanović Serbia Hafiz Bakhshaliyev Azerbaijan Goran Radonjic Montenegro
Jan Antoska Slovakia

Women's Low-Kick Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Bantamweight -48 kg
details
Anabyeva Svetlana Russia Ekateruba Verzhbitskaya Russia Corina Carlescu Romania
Zeljana Pitesa Croatia
Featherweight -52 kg
details
Maria Krivoshapkina Russia Ekaterina Dumbrava Russia Vira Makresova Ukraine
Eva Ott Hungary
Lightweight -56 kg
details
Milena Dincic Serbia Maryna Batsman Ukraine Arsalane Ahlam France
Lidia Andreeva Russia
Middleweight -60 kg
details
Barbara Plazzoli Italy Milijanka Cenic Serbia Olga Zyk Russia
Fatima Bokova Russia
Light Heavyweight -65 kg
details
Vera Avdeeva Russia Mimma Mandolini Italy Jelena Juric Serbia
Maja Djukanovic Serbia
Heavyweight -70 kg
details
Svetlana Kulakova Russia Elena Kondratyeva Russia Olivera Milanovic Serbia
Nataša Ivetić Serbia
Super Heavyweight +70 kg
details
Natalija Simac Croatia Daniela Lazarevska Republic of Macedonia No bronze medallists recorded

Thai-Boxing[edit]

Thai-Boxing, more commonly known as Muay Thai, is a type of kickboxing that allows the participants to throw punches, kicks, elbows and knees at full force to legal targets on the opponents body. Due to the physical nature of the sport, stoppages are not uncommon, although in amateur Thai-Boxing head and body protection must be worn. At Skopje both men and women took part in the style with the men having twelve weight divisions ranging from 51 kg/112.2 lbs to over 91 kg/+200.2 lbs and the women six, ranging from 52 kg/114.4 lbs to over 70 kg/154 lbs and unlike more recent W.A.K.O. championships (aside from Lisbon) some countries were allowed more than one athlete per weight division.

There were not too many recognisable winners in Thai-Boxing at Skopje although Vitaly Gurkov had won a number of amateur world championships with various organizations prior to this event and would go on to win a K-1 regional tournament as a pro. By the end of the championships Russia finally overhauled the dominance of Belarus in the style, coming out top with six gold, seven silver and seven bronze medals.[6]

Men's Thai-Boxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Light Bantamweight -51 kg
details
Giampiero Marceddu Italy Siarhei Skiba Belarus Andrey Mikhaylov Russia
Bantamweight -54 kg
details
Maksym Glubochenko Ukraine Goran Mimica Croatia Andrea Molon Italy
Featherweight -57 kg
details
Aleksandar Gogic Serbia Ruben Almedia Portugal Ramil Novruzov Belarus
Ilya Mordvinov Russia
Lightweight -60 kg
details
Pashik Tatoyan Russia Bahtiyar Iskanderzade Azerbaijan Gor Shavelyan Russia
Aleksandar Jankovic Serbia
Light Welterweight -63.5 kg
details
Yury Zhvokovski Belarus Sergey Solomennokov Russia Stanislav Ushakov Russia
Michele Iezzi Italy
Welterweight -67 kg
details
Vitaly Gurkov Belarus Nikolay Bubnov Russia Mikhail Mishin Russia
Nebojsa Denic Serbia
Light Middleweight -71 kg
details
Denis Dikusar Russia Rizvan Isaev Russia Ile Risteski Republic of Macedonia
Milos Mihaljevic Serbia
Middleweight -75 kg
details
Yury Harbachov Belarus Mikhail Chalykh Russia Kamel Mezatni France
Aleksandre Stajkovski Republic of Macedonia
Light Heavyweight -81 kg
details
Dzianis Hancharonak Belarus Ivan Damianov Bulgaria Dmytro Kirpan Ukraine
Arpad Forgon Hungary
Cruiserweight -86 kg
details
Maxim Vinogradov Russia Aly Staubmann Austria Siarhei Krauchanka Belarus
Zaur Alekporov Azerbaijan
Heavyweight -91 kg
details
Kiril Pendjurov Bulgaria Atanas Stojkovski Republic of Macedonia Alexey Shevtsov Russia
Igor Jurković Croatia
Super Heavyweight +91 kg
details
Alexey Kudin Belarus Valentino Venturini Croatia Mirko Vlahović Montenegro
Mladen Bozic Serbia

Women's Thai-Boxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Bantamweight -48 kg
details
Anna Kozelkova Russia Viktoria Ageeva Russia Anett Urban Hungary
Featherweight -52 kg
details
Petra Buchenberger Hungary Alisa Chukhnina Russia Kristina Karamatic Croatia
Adi Rotem Israel
Lightweight -56 kg
details
Irma Balijagic Bosnia and Herzegovina Barbara Vlahov Croatia No bronze medallists recorded
Middleweight -60 kg
details
Natalya Kamenskikh Russia Ana Mandic Croatia Panu Donatella Italy
Sanja Samardzic Bosnia and Herzegovina
Light Heavyweight -65 kg
details
Elena Solareva Russia Lejla Osmani Republic of Macedonia No bronze medallists recorded
Heavyweight -70 kg
details
Nives Radic Croatia Ekaterina Rokunova Russia Tatiana Ovchinnikova Russia

Light-Contact[edit]

Light-Contact is a form of kickboxing that is less physical than Full-Contact but more so than Semi-Contact and is often seen as a transition between the two. Contestants score points on the basis of speed and technique over brute force although stoppages can occur, although as with other amateur forms head and body protection must be worn - more detail on Light-Contact rules can be found on the official W.A.K.O. website.[7] The men had nine weight divisions ranging from 57 kg/125.4 lbs to over 94 kg/+206.8 lbs while the women had six ranging from 50 kg/110 lbs to over 70 kg/154 lbs and unlike more recent W.A.K.O. championships (aside from Lisbon) some countries were allowed more than one athlete per weight division.

As it is often in the shadow of the full contact styles there were not many familiar faces in Light-Contact although Dezső Debreczeni, who is a regular winner in Light and Semi-Contact, won another gold medal. By the end of the championships Hungary prevented Russia from being top in all three styles at Skopje by winning three golds, two silvers and three bronze.[8]

Men's Light-Contact Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-57 kg
details
Dezső Debreczeni Hungary Maxim Aysin Russia Fabien Saby France
Artur Novikov Russia
-63 kg
details
Konstyantyn Demoretskyy Ukraine Mikhail Gerasimov Russia Kamel Bacha France
Stanislav Petrov Bulgaria
-69 kg
details
Przemysław Ziemnicki Poland Danir Yusupov Russia Zsolt Nagy Hungary
Juraj Hoppan Slovakia
-74 kg
details
Toby Bemuller Republic of Ireland Sergey Faretov Russia Artem Noskov Ukraine
Attila Olasz Hungary
-79 kg
details
Stefan Bücker Germany Zoltan Dancso Hungary Christophe Touzeau France
Bernhard Sussitz Austria
-84 kg
details
Duane Reid United Kingdom Murat Pukhaev Russia Rainer Gerdenitsch Austria
David Nagode Slovenia
-89 kg
details
Gavin Williamson United Kingdom Mattia Bezzon Italy Artem Vasylenko Ukraine
Berislav Budiscak Croatia
-94 kg
details
Giovanni Nurchi Germany Mikael Bäckström Sweden Tibor Wappel Hungary
Emin Panyan Russia
+94 kg
details
Michal Wszelak Poland Merlin Gehrt Germany Konstantin Kuleshov Russia
Cristian Lubrano Italy

Women's Light-Contact Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-50 kg
details
Fatima Zaaboula France Reka Krempf Hungary Therese Gunnarsson Sweden
Alexandra Kibanova Russia
-55 kg
details
Maria Kushtanova Russia Zaneta Ciesla Poland Andriana Tricoli Italy
Roxana Lasak France
-60 kg
details
Julie McHale Republic of Ireland Katarina Ilicic Croatia Tamara Radkovic Slovenia
Maria Antonietta Lovicu Italy
-65 kg
details
Marta Fenyvesi Hungary Katarzyna Furmaniak Poland Sabina Sehic Slovenia
Nicole Trimmel Austria
-70 kg
details
Ivett Pruzsinszky Hungary Lariza Brezenko Ukraine Annalisa Ghilardi Italy
Kate Kearney United Kingdom
+70 kg
details
Oxana Kinakh Russia Paulina Biec Poland Zeliha Doğrugüneş Turkey
Sabine Schnell Germany

Overall Medals Standing (Top 5)[edit]

Ranking Country Gold Gold Silver Silver Bronze Bronze
1 Russia Russia 20 16 19
2 Belarus Belarus 5 2 2
3 Serbia Serbia 4 5 11
4 Hungary Hungary 4 2 7
5 Italy Italy 2 2 7

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "EUROPEI DI SCOPJE (In Italian - event details)". www.ilguerriero.it. Retrieved 2011-06-23. 
  2. ^ "WAKO European Championships - Skopje Macedonia - Welcome (Event details)". www.european-championships-macedonia-2006.com. Retrieved 2011-06-23. 
  3. ^ "WAKO European Championships - Skopje Macedonia - Competitors". www.european-championships-macedonia-2006.com. 
  4. ^ "WAKO Low-Kick Rules" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-23. 
  5. ^ "results.pdf (scroll down to Low Kick pg 5)". www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-23. 
  6. ^ "results.pdf (scroll down to Thai Kickboxing pg 3)". www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-23. 
  7. ^ "WAKO Light-Contact Rules" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-23. 
  8. ^ "results.pdf (Light Contact)". www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-23. 

External links[edit]