W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 (Belgrade)

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W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 (Belgrade)
Wako.jpg
A poster or logo for W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 (Belgrade).
Information
Promotion W.A.K.O.
Date September 24 (Start)
October 1, 2007 (End)
Venue Pionir Hall
City Serbia Belgrade, Serbia
Event chronology
W.A.K.O. European Championships 2006 in Skopje W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 (Belgrade) W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 in Coimbra

W.A.K.O. World Championships 2007 in Belgrade were the joint 16th edition of the W.A.K.O. world championships - the second event would be held later that year in Coimbra, Portugal. They were for amateur male and female kickboxers and covered the following categories; K-1, Low-Kick and Light-Contact. Weight classes for men ranged from light bantamweight (51 kg or 112 lb) to super heavyweight (over 91 kg or 200.6 lb), while the women's ranged from featherweight (52 kg or 114.6 lb) to super heavyweight (over 70 kg or 154 lb). More information on the categories, weight classes and rules is provided in the various sections below. In total there were 1085 athletes at the championships, representing sixty countries including China (taking part for the very first time), fighting in 49 tournaments. The Belgrade championships were held at the Pionir Hall in Belgrade, Serbia from Monday, September 24 to Monday, October 1, 2007.[1]

K-1[edit]

W.A.K.O.'s K-1 category uses the same rules set by the K-1 organization and combine a mixture of techniques from Muay Thai, Karate, western boxing and other forms of stand up fighting.[2] The main difference between K-1 rules and other forms of kickboxing is the use of the clinch and knees – which have recently been limited to one knee per clinch. Attacks that are legal include strikes to the head (front, side and forehead), the torso (front and side), leg (any part) and foot/feet (sweeps only). As mentioned before fighters are also allowed to knees (only one hand to clinch and one knee strike per clinch) and can use the back fist/spinning back fist technique. Strikes that are illegal include attacks to the top of the head, the back, the top of the shoulders, the neck and shots to the groin. Techniques involving elbows are also illegal. Due to the amateur nature of W.A.K.O. championships all fighters must wear protection for their head, teeth, breast (women only) groin, shin and feet, and must fight with the standard 10-ounce (280 g) gloves.[3]

Each fight is three, two-minute rounds and is scored by three judges who score successful (legal) strikes that are not blocked, and are thrown with full power. As with other forms, illegal strikes may result in a point(s) deduction or even disqualification. Unlike Full-Contact and Low-Kick it is not necessary for the minimum six kicks per round to be counte. Victory can be achieved by a point's decision, technical knockout or knockout, abandonment (when one fighter gives up), disqualification or by a walkover (other fighter is unable to participate). If a fighter is knocked down three times in the fight he will automatically lose via technical knockout. More detail on K-1 rules can be found at the official W.A.K.O. website.[4]

Weight classes in K-1 at Belgrade were similar to that of the Low-Kick category, with the men having eleven weight classes from bantamweight (54 kg or 118.8 lb) to super heavyweight (over 90 kg or 200.2 lb), while the women's had six beginning at featherweight (52 kg or 114.4 lb) and ending super heavyweight (over 70 kg or 154 lb). Belarus was the most successful nation in K-1 winning five gold, three silver and five bronze in both the male and female categories.[5]

K-1 (Men) Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Bantamweight -54 kg
details
Fernando Machado Portugal Aliaksei Papou Belarus Amine Alaoui M'Hamdi Morocco
Azamat Murzabekov Russia
Featherweight -57 kg
details
Maksym Glubochenko Ukraine Aleksandar Gogic Serbia Yury Satsuk Belarus
Gaetano Verziere Italy
Lightweight -60 kg
details
Elbar Umarakaev Russia Emrah Ogut Turkey Serhiy Adamchuk Ukraine
Gillermo Estrada Martinez Mexico
Light Welterweight -63.5 kg
details
Andrei Kulebin Belarus Kurbanali Akaev Russia Jose Luis Uribe Garcia Mexico
Sreten Miletic Serbia
Welterweight -67 kg
details
Piotr Kobylanski Poland Gor Shavelyan Russia Vitaliy Hubenko Ukraine
Yauheni Vinahradau Belarus
Light Middleweight -71 kg
details
Dmitry Valent Belarus Rizvan Isaev Russia Djime Coulibaly France
Manuele Raini Italy
Middleweight -75 kg
details
Yury Harbachou Belarus Kamel Metzani France José Reis Portugal
Ile Risteski Republic of Macedonia
Light Heavyweight -81 kg
details
Dmitry Kirpan Ukraine Luka Simic Croatia Dzianis Hanchardnak Belarus
Alexander Stetsurenko Russia
Cruiserweight -86 kg
details
Dženan Poturak Bosnia and Herzegovina Ivan Stanić Croatia Zaur Alakbarov Azerbaijan
Siarhei Krauchanka Belarus
Heavyweight -91 kg
details
Andrei Malchanau Belarus Atanas Stojkovski Republic of Macedonia Zoran Majkic Croatia
Nenad Miletic Serbia
Super Heavyweight +91 kg
details
Alexei Kudin Belarus Dzhamal Kasumov Russia Mladen Bozic Serbia
Mirko Vlahovic Montenegro

K-1 (Women) Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Featherweight -52 kg
details
Rajaa Hajdaowi Morocco Yulia El Skaya Russia Natasa Ninic Serbia
Eva Ott Hungary
Lightweight -56 kg
details
Souad Rochdi Morocco Alena Kuchynskaya Belarus Donatella Panu Italy
Natalia Grabowska Poland
Middleweight -60 kg
details
Alena Muratava Belarus Kseniya Belskaya Russia Paola Cappucci Italy
Suzana Radovanovic Serbia
Light Heavyweight -65 kg
details
Elena Solareva Russia Ala Ivashkevich Belarus Jelena Djuric Serbia
Only 3 contestants
Heavyweight -70 kg
details
Eva Halasi Serbia Rabih Soukayna Morocco Maryna Kalinina Belarus
Ekaterina Rokunova Russia
Super Heavyweight +70 kg
details
Zita Zatyko Hungary Samira El Haddad Morocco Azza Attoura Syria
Albina Vaskeykina Russia

Low-Kick[edit]

Low-Kick is similar to Full-Contact kickboxing only that as well as allowing kicks and punches to the head and body, it also allows clean kicks to be made to opponents legs. Attacks that are legal include strikes to the head (front, side and forehead), the torso (front and side), leg (thigh) and foot/feet (sweeps only). Strikes that are illegal include attacks to the top of the head, the back, the top of the shoulders, the neck and the groin. All fighters are required to wear protection for their head, teeth, breast (women only) groin, shin and feet, and must fight with the standard 10-ounce (280 g) gloves.[6]

A minimum of six kicks must be thrown each round or points may be deducted by the referee. Each fight is three, two minute rounds and is scored by three judges. The judges will score successful (legal) strikes that are not blocked, and are thrown with full power. Illegal moves may result in points deduction or if repeated, disqualification. In the event of a draw after three rounds the judges will base the victor on who was stronger in the final round, or failing that will use their remarks from each round to deduce who wins. Victory can be achieved by a point's decision, technical knockout or knockout, abandonment (when one fighter gives up), disqualification or by a walkover (other fighter is unable to participate). If a fighter is knocked down three times in the fight he will automatically lose via technical knockout. More detail on Low-Kick rules can be found at the official W.A.K.O. website.[7]

At Belgrade the men's Low-Kick competition had twelve six weight classes starting at light bantamweight (51 kg or 112.2 lb) to super heavyweight (over 91 kg or 200.2 lb), while the women's had six ranging from featherweight (52 kg or 114.4 lb) to super heavyweight (over 70 kg or 154 lb), while . As with Light-Contact, by the championships end, Russia was the strongest nation, having won an impressive haul of six gold, two silver and two bronze medals.[8]

Low-Kick (Men) Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Light Bantamweight -51 kg
details
Zaur Mammadov Azerbaijan Ivan Sciolla Italy Aleksandar Aleksandrov Bulgaria
Utkin Hudoyanov Kyrgyzstan
Bantamweight -54 kg
details
Emil Karimov Azerbaijan Jordan Vassilev Bulgaria Youness Ouali Alami Morocco
Fabrice Bauluck Mauritius
Featherweight -57 kg
details
Dzmitry Varatis Belarus Boban Marinkovic Serbia Umar Paskhaev Russia
Elnur Salamov Azerbaijan
Lightweight -60 kg
details
Zurab Faroyan Russia Eduard Mammadov Azerbaijan Fikri Arican Turkey
Dzianis Tselitsa Belarus
Light Welterweight -63.5 kg
details
Artur Magadov Russia Soufiane Zridy Morocco Mirlan Ibraimov Kyrgyzstan
Mihajio Jovanovic Serbia
Welterweight -67 kg
details
Nikolay Shtakhanov Russia Yahya Alemdag Turkey Nebojsa Denic Serbia
Ramil Nadirov Azerbaijan
Light Middleweight -71 kg
details
Konstantin Sbytov Russia Michał Głogowski Poland Milan Dragojlovic Serbia
Paolo Iry France
Middleweight -75 kg
details
Marko Benzon Croatia Bakari Tounkara France Dragan Micic Serbia
Nurlan Nurgaliyev Kazakhstan
Light Heavyweight -81 kg
details
Nenad Pagonis Serbia Rail Rajabov Azerbaijan Viktor Nordh Sweden
Denes Racz Hungary
Cruiserweight -86 kg
details
Gamzat Isalmagomedov Russia Stipe Stipetic Croatia Bojan Glavas Bosnia and Herzegovina
Georgiy Yemeliyanov Kazakhstan
Heavyweight -91 kg
details
Yauhen Anhalevich Belarus Igor Jurković Croatia Dmitriy Antonenko Russia
Abdeslam Narjiss Morocco
Super Heavyweight +91 kg
details
Dragan Jovanović Serbia Mikhail Shvoev Russia Ruslan Aushev Kazakhstan
Hafiz Bahshaliyev Azerbaijan

Low-Kick (Women) Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Featherweight -52 kg
details
Seda Duygu Aygün Turkey Nadiya Khayenok Ukraine Aliya Boranbayeva Kazakhstan
Maria Krivoshapkina Russia
Lightweight -56 kg
details
Lidia Andreeva Russia Milena Dincic Serbia Elisa Albinsson Sweden
Alicja Piecyk Poland
Middleweight -60 kg
details
Valerija Kurluk Kazakhstan Fatima Bokova Russia Ana Mandic Croatia
Barbara Plazzoli Italy
Light Heavyweight -65 kg
details
Kamila Balanda Poland Mimma Mandolini Italy Vera Avdeeva Russia
Ina Ozerava Belarus
Heavyweight -70 kg
details
Amzail Bouchra Morocco Nives Radic Croatia Natasa Ivetic Serbia
Elena Kondratyeva Russia
Super Heavyweight +70 kg
details
Paulina Biec Poland Olivera Milanovic Serbia Aigul Kozhagaliyeva Kazakhstan
Benita Muller South Africa

Light-Contact[edit]

In this form of kickboxing fighters are scored on their ability to land controlled and clean strikes with an emphasis put on style over power. Fighters that fight too aggressively may be cautioned by the referee and, if the offence is repeated, may be disqualified, although strikes that are too light (such as a push or brush) will not be scored either. Attacks are allowed to the head (front, side and forehead), the torso (front and side) and leg (foot sweeps). As mentioned before excessive force is illegal as well as strikes to the top of the head, the back, the top of the shoulders, the neck and below the belt. Light-Contact is seen as the intermediate stage between Semi and Full-Contact kickboxing involving more physicality than Semi but less so than Full. All fighters are required to wear protection for their head, teeth, breast (women only) groin, shin and feet, and must fight with the standard 10oz gloves.[9]

Fighters score the following points for landing a controlled strike on their opponent; punch, kick to body, foot sweep (1 point), kick to head, jumping kick to body (2 points), jumping kick to head (3 points). Each fight is three, two-minute rounds and is scored by three judges. In the event of a draw the match will be scored electronically. Victory can be achieved by points decision, technical knockout (usually when one fighter is so dominant the referee is forced to stop the contest), abandonment (when one fighter gives up), disqualification or by a walkover (other fighter is unable to participate). More detail on Light-Contact rules can be found at the official W.A.K.O. website.[10]

Light-Contact uses slightly different weight classes from Low-Kick and K-1. At Belgrade the men had nine weight classes, starting at 57 kg or 125.4 lb and ending at over 94 kg (206.8 lb), while the women's Light-Contact competition had five weight classes beginning at 55 kg (121 lb) and ending at over 70 kg (154 lb). At the end of the championships, Russia was the most successful nation in Light-Contact having won five gold and two silver medals.[11]

Light-Contact (Men) Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-57 kg
details
Dezső Debreczeni Hungary Maxim Aysin Russia Thomas Karlsson Sweden
Selcuk Laleci Turkey
-63 kg
details
Marko Sarko Croatia Sandor Szanto Hungary Murat Aydin Turkey
Kostyantyn Demorets'kyy Ukraine
-69 kg
details
Przemyslaw Ziemnicki Poland Fighter Disqualified Dejan Cepic Croatia
Fighter Disqualified
-74 kg
details
Sergey Zhukov Russia Jerzy Wronski Poland Martin Muravsky Slovakia
Kieran Ryan Republic of Ireland
-79 kg
details
Zoltan Dancso Hungary Stefan Bücker Germany Robert Matyja Poland
Martin Navratil Slovakia
-84 kg
details
Murat Pukhaev Russia Christian Albrecht Germany Mariusz Niziolek Poland
Jeno Novak Hungary
-89 kg
details
Ildar Gabbasov Russia Gavin Williamson United Kingdom Yohann Lemair France
Juso Prosic Austria
-94 kg
details
Giovanni Nurchi Germany Emin Panyan Russia Ranis Smajlovic Slovenia
Artem Vasylenko Ukraine
+94 kg
details
Michal Wszelak Poland Igor Kravchuk Ukraine Pascal Blunschi Switzerland
Csaba Podor Hungary

Light-Contact (Women) Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-55 kg
details
Maria Kushtanova Russia Monika Molnar Hungary Kateryna Solovey Switzerland
Maria Krivoshapkina Ukraine
-60 kg
details
Klara Marton Hungary Julie McHale Republic of Ireland Monika Florek Poland
Andrea Ivas Croatia
-65 kg
details
Sabina Sehic Slovenia Nicole Trimmel Austria Julia Göldner Germany
Irena Kobosilova Czech Republic
-70 kg
details
Agnieszka Poltorak Poland Karin Edenius Sweden Dianna Cameron United Kingdom
Nikolina Juricev Croatia
+70 kg
details
Oxana Kinakh Russia Barbara Kovacs Hungary Diana Cambell Republic of Ireland
Natali John Germany

Overall Medals Standing (Top 5)[edit]

The nation that came out on top at the W.A.K.O. Amateur World Championships 2007 in Belgrade were Russia who amassed fourteen gold, ten silvers and ten bronze medals in all categories, both male and female.[12]

Ranking Country Gold Gold Silver Silver Bronze Bronze
1 Russia Russia 14 10 10
2 Belarus Belarus 8 4 8
3 Serbia Serbia 3 4 11
4 Poland Poland 6 2 5
5 Hungary Hungary 4 4 4

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "16TH WAKO WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS IN BELGRADE". www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-03-09. 
  2. ^ ""CHAPTER ONE – WAKO SAFETY EQUIPMENT, FIGHTING AREA, RING AND UNIFORMS"". www.k-1.co.jp. Retrieved 2011-03-09. 
  3. ^ ""CHAPTER ONE – WAKO SAFETY EQUIPMENT, FIGHTING AREA, RING AND UNIFORMS"" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-03-07. 
  4. ^ ""WAKO K1-Rules"" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-03-09. 
  5. ^ ""K-1-Style w -52 kg - Kickboxing Ireland Home Page (K-1 Results)"" (PDF). www.kickboxingireland.ie. Retrieved 2011-03-09. 
  6. ^ "CHAPTER ONE – WAKO SAFETY EQUIPMENT, FIGHTING AREA, RING AND UNIFORMS" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-03-07. 
  7. ^ ""WAKO Low-Kick Rules"" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-03-07. 
  8. ^ ""LK w -52 kg - Kickboxing Ireland Home Page (Low-Kick Results)"" (PDF). www.kickboxingireland.ie. Retrieved 2011-03-08. 
  9. ^ ""CHAPTER ONE – WAKO SAFETY EQUIPMENT, FIGHTING AREA, RING AND UNIFORMS"" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-03-07. 
  10. ^ ""WAKO Light-Contact Rules"" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-03-07. 
  11. ^ ""LC w -55 kg - Kickboxing Ireland Home Page (Light-Contact Results)"" (PDF). www.kickboxingireland.ie. Retrieved 2011-03-07. 
  12. ^ "Medaltable LK,LC,K1 - Medals Table (all Disciplines)" (PDF). www.kickboxingireland.ie. Retrieved 2011-03-10. 

External links[edit]