W. Christopher Winter

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W. Christopher Winter
W. Christopher.Winter.TEDx.jpg
Winter lecturing in 2014.
Born (1972-12-27) December 27, 1972 (age 45)
Roanoke, Virginia, United States
ResidenceUnited States
EducationEmory University School of Medicine
Alma materUniversity of Virginia
Scientific career
InstitutionsCharlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine
Websitewww.cvilleneuroandsleep.com
www.thesleepsolutionbook.com

William Christopher Winter (born December 27, 1972) is an American sleep researcher, neurologist, author, and authority regarding sleep and athletic performance.[1] A 2010 article in Trail Runner magazine described Winter as "the leading expert in the field of sleep disruption, in athletes and issues related to travel."[2] He is credited with coining the term circadian advantage after studying the effects of travel on Major League Baseball teams.[3] He studied the effect of sleep timing preference on Major League Baseball pitcher performance,[4] and hitting performance.[5] In 2013, his research linked the sleepiness of Major League Baseball player to a reduced career longevity.[6][7] This work led to research into sleepiness as a predictor of NFL Draft value in which the sleep of 560 Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) football players and their eventual draft success was studied.[8]

To date, he has advised numerous professional athletic organizations,[9] most notably the San Francisco Giants who publicly commented on his role with their club in 2012 [10] and 2014.[11] It has been documented that he has also worked with the Oklahoma City Thunder, New York Rangers[12] and the Los Angeles Dodgers[13] with this latter reference referring to Winter's work with athletic sleep to be the "Best Secret Weapon [in Sports]." Winter, described as "sleep whisperer"[14] is referenced repeatedly by Arianna Huffington in her 2016 book The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time.[15]

Winter's debut book, The Sleep Solution: Why Your Sleep is Broken and How to Fix It, was released by Penguin Random House on April 4, 2017.[16]

The Sleep Solution[edit]

The Sleep Solution: Why Your Sleep Is Broken and How To Fix It
AuthorW. Christopher Winter, MD
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience book
Published4 April 2017, Penguin Random House
Pages262
ISBN978-0-399-58360-5

The Sleep Solution: Why Your Sleep Is Broken and How To Fix It is a science book about sleep by neurologist W. Christopher Winter, who specializes in sleep and performance.

The book was released on April 4, 2017 to favorable reviews. A review in Refinery 29 stated, "Dr. Winter's first book, The Sleep Solution: Why Your Sleep Is Broken And How To Fix It, is already being hailed as a "solution" to insomnia. It's a no-nonsense, colloquial approach to sleep difficulties that aims to change the narrative around sleep in order to make it more manageable."[17] Kirkus Reviews wrote, ""The rare book that may help sufferers of poor sleep improve their quality of rest simply by elucidating the context of good sleep and offering the right techniques to achieve it.".[18] Publishers Weekly wrote, ""As a neurologist specializing in sleep issues, Winter certainly has good credentials to back up his promise to readers that they’ll finish his book with a newfound sense of what it means to have healthy sleep.” [19] In November of 2018, NY Magazine named the book one of the top 7 books for understanding sleep and the best book for insomnia.[20] The book received favorable international press both in Ireland[21] and the Netherlands[22]

Time published an excerpt from the book on April 26, 2017.[23]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Jaffee, MS; Winter, WC (2015). "Sleep disturbances in athletic concussion". Brain Injury. 29 (2): 221–7. doi:10.3109/02699052.2014.983978. PMID 25587746.
  • Winter, WC; Hammond, WR; Green, NH; Zhang, Z; Bliwise, DL (2009). "Measuring circadian advantage in Major League Baseball: a 10-year retrospective study". International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 4 (3): 394–401. PMID 19953826.
  • Morgan, JC; Winter, WC; Wooten, GF (2004). "Amphetamine-induced chorea in attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder". Movement Disorders. 19 (7): 840–842. doi:10.1002/mds.20081. PMID 15254949.
  • Winter, WC; Juel, VC (2003). "Hypoglossal neuropathy in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy". Neurology. 61 (8): 1154–1155. doi:10.1212/01.wnl.0000086808.56096.da. PMID 14581692.
  • Ranta, A; Winter, WC; Login, IS (2003). "Extracranial hypoglossal schwannoma". Neurology. 60 (12): E11. doi:10.1212/01.WNL.0000060184.63911.B0. PMID 12821768.
  • Qureshi, AI; Winter, WC; Bliwise, DL (1999). "Sleep fragmentation and morning cerebrovasomotor reactivity to hypercapnia". American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 160 (4): 1244–1247. doi:10.1164/ajrccm.160.4.9810111. PMID 10508814.
  • Lonergan, RP; Ware, JC; Atkinson, RL; Winter, WC; Suratt, PM (1998). "Sleep apnea in obese miniature pigs". Journal of Applied Physiology. 84 (2): 531–536. PMID 9475862.
  • Winter, WC; Gampper, T; Gay, SB; Suratt, PM (1997). "Lateral pharyngeal fat pad pressure during breathing in anesthetized pigs". Journal of Applied Physiology. 83 (3): 688–694. PMID 9292450.
  • Winter, WC; Gampper, T; Gay, SB; Suratt, PM (1996). "Lateral pharyngeal fat pad pressure during breathing". Sleep. 19 (10): 178–179. PMID 9085504.
  • Winter, WC; Gampper, T; Gay, SB; Suratt, PM (1995). "Enlargement of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad space in pigs increases upper airway resistance". Journal of Applied Physiology. 79 (3): 726–731. PMID 8567510.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matt McCarthy (13 April 2015). "Science of nap time: Seeking an edge in the most basic of all human needs". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 7 May 2016.
  2. ^ Mackenzie Lobby (1 August 2010). "Get In Rhythm". Trail Runner. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  3. ^ "Major League Baseball Teams With Greater Circadian Advantage Are More Likely To Succeed". Science Daily. 10 June 2008. Retrieved 6 May 2016.
  4. ^ "Sleep preference can predict performance of Major League Baseball pitchers". Science Daily. 11 June 2010. Retrieved 7 May 2016.
  5. ^ Erik Malinowski (13 June 2011). "Do Athletes Play Better at Night? Better Sleep on It". Details. Retrieved 7 May 2016.
  6. ^ "Fatigue and sleep linked to Major League Baseball performance and career longevity". Science Daily. 31 May 2013. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  7. ^ "Sleep Linked With MLB Career Longevity". Huffington Post. 4 June 2013. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  8. ^ Colby Stong (November 2012). "Can Quality of Sleep Help Predict Productivity of NFL Draft Picks?". Neurology Reviews. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  9. ^ Joseph Hooper (1 May 2016). "The Man Who Helps Pro Athletes Fall Asleep". Men's Journal. Retrieved 6 May 2016.
  10. ^ Jason Koebler (15 June 2012). "The New Moneyball? It's Major League Sleep". US News & World Report. Retrieved 6 May 2016.
  11. ^ "Sweet Dreams: Sleep Expert Helps Giants in October". Associated Press. 25 October 2014. Retrieved 6 May 2016.
  12. ^ Jamie Lisanti (22 October 2014). "How doctors and dietitians help NBA players fight jet lag with nutrition". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 17 December 2017.
  13. ^ Jamie Lisanti (20 November 2017). "Best Secret Weapon: Sweet Dreams". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 7 May 2016.
  14. ^ Arianna Huffington (26 February 2015). "My Q and A With W. Chris Winter, Sleep Whisperer to Some of the World's Top Athletes". Huffington Post. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  15. ^ Arianna Huffington (17 March 2016). "How to Fight Jet Lag: Exclusive Excerpt From Arianna Huffington's 'The Sleep Revolution'". Marriott Traveler. Retrieved 7 May 2016.
  16. ^ W. Christopher Winter (4 April 2017). "The Sleep Solution". Penguin Random House Group. Retrieved 19 September 2016.
  17. ^ Commons, Jess (2017-07-13). "Meet The Man Who Reckons He Can Fix Your Sleep Forever". Retrieved 2017-12-18.
  18. ^ "The Sleep Solution: Why Your Sleep Is Broken and How To Fix It by W. Christopher Winter, MD review". Kirkus Reviews. 2017-02-13. Retrieved 2017-12-18.
  19. ^ "The Sleep Solution: Why Your Sleep Is Broken and How To Fix It by W. Christopher Winter, MD review". Publishers Weekly. 2017-03-01. Retrieved 2017-12-18.
  20. ^ Schneider, Katy (2018-11-17). "The 7 Best Books To Understand Sleep". New York Magazine. Retrieved 2018-11-27.
  21. ^ Thompson, Sylvia (2017-07-18). "Trouble sleeping? You need to read this before bed". The Irish Times. Retrieved 2017-12-18.
  22. ^ Waterval, Dirk (2017-04-08). "Een slechte nacht is heus geen ramp". Trouw. Retrieved 2017-12-18.
  23. ^ "The Number-One Thing You Can Do for Better Sleep". Time.com. 2017-04-26. Retrieved 2017-12-18.

External links[edit]