WASP-19

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WASP-19
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Vela[1]
Right ascension 09h 53m 40.0765s[2]
Declination −45° 39′ 33.056″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) 12.312 ± 0.017[3]
Characteristics
Spectral type G8V
Apparent magnitude (B) 13.58
Apparent magnitude (R) 12.17
Apparent magnitude (I) 11.35
Apparent magnitude (J) 10.911 ± 0.026[4]
Apparent magnitude (H) 10.602 ± 0.022[4]
Apparent magnitude (K) 10.481 ± 0.023[4]
B−V color index 1.3
V−R color index 0.1
R−I color index 0.82
Variable type planetary transit
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: −35.407±0.041[2] mas/yr
Dec.: 17.288±0.040[2] mas/yr
Parallax (π)3.6981 ± 0.0236[2] mas
Distance882 ± 6 ly
(270 ± 2 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)5.3
Details
Mass0.95 M
Radius0.93 R
Luminosity0.71 L
Surface gravity (log g)4.45 ± 0.05[5] cgs
Temperature5568 ± 71[5] K
Metallicity [Fe/H]0.15 ± 0.07[5] dex
Rotation10.5 ± 0.2 days[6]
Rotational velocity (v sin i)4.0 ± 1.0[5] km/s
Age600 Myr
Other designations
GSC 08181-01711, USNO-B1.0 0443-00193111, 2MASS J09534008-4539330
Database references
SIMBADdata
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

WASP-19 is a magnitude 12.3 star located in the Vela constellation of the southern hemisphere.[6] This star has been found to host a transiting hot Jupiter-type planet in tight orbit.

Planetary system[edit]

In December 2009 SuperWASP project announced that a hot Jupiter type extrasolar planet, WASP-19b, was orbiting very close to this star and with the shortest orbital period so far detected.[6]

The WASP-19 planetary system[7]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b 1.139 ± 0.030 MJ 0.01634 ± 0.00019 0.7888396 ± 0.00000010 0 78.76 ± 0.13° 1.410 ± 0.017 RJ

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roman, Nancy G. (1987). "Identification of a Constellation From a Position". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 99 (617): 695–699. Bibcode:1987PASP...99..695R. doi:10.1086/132034.  Vizier query form
  2. ^ a b c d e Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; et al. (Gaia Collaboration) (April 2018). "Gaia Data Release 2. Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. arXiv:1804.09365Freely accessible. Bibcode:2018arXiv180409365G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201833051.  Gaia Data Release 2 Vizier catalog entry
  3. ^ Maxted, P. F. L.; et al. (2011). "UBV(RI)C photometry of transiting planet hosting stars". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 418 (2): 1039–1042. arXiv:1108.0349Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011MNRAS.418.1039M. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19554.x. 
  4. ^ a b c Skrutskie, M. F.; et al. (2006). "The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)". The Astronomical Journal. 131 (2): 1163–1183. Bibcode:2006AJ....131.1163S. doi:10.1086/498708. Vizier catalog entry
  5. ^ a b c d Torres, Guillermo; et al. (2012). "Improved Spectroscopic Parameters for Transiting Planet Hosts". The Astrophysical Journal. 757 (2). 161. arXiv:1208.1268Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...757..161T. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/757/2/161. 
  6. ^ a b c Hebb, L.; et al. (2010). "WASP-19b: The Shortest Period Transiting Exoplanet Yet Discovered". The Astrophysical Journal. 708 (1): 224–231. arXiv:1001.0403Freely accessible. Bibcode:2010ApJ...708..224H. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/708/1/224. 
  7. ^ Mancini, L.; et al. (2013). "Physical properties, transmission and emission spectra of the WASP-19 planetary system from multi-colour photometry". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 436 (1): 2–18. arXiv:1306.6384Freely accessible. Bibcode:2013MNRAS.436....2M. doi:10.1093/mnras/stt1394. 

Coordinates: Sky map 09h 53m 40.07s, −45° 39′ 33.06″