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WCNC-TV

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WCNC-TV
WCNC-TV logo 2020.png
Charlotte, North Carolina
United States
ChannelsDigital: 24 (UHF)
Virtual: 36
BrandingWCNC Charlotte (general)
WCNC Charlotte News (newscasts)
Programming
Affiliations
Ownership
OwnerTegna Inc.
(WCNC-TV, Inc.)
History
First air date
July 9, 1967 (54 years ago) (1967-07-09)
Former call signs
  • WCTU-TV (1967–1970)
  • WRET-TV (1970–1980)
  • WPCQ-TV (1980–1989)
Former channel number(s)
  • Analog:
  • 36 (UHF, 1967–2009)
  • Digital:
  • 22 (UHF, 1999–2019)
Independent (1967–1978)
Call sign meaning
"Charlotte, North Carolina"[1]
Technical information
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID32326
ERP857 kW
HAAT592.2 m (1,943 ft)
Transmitter coordinates35°20′49.4″N 81°10′14.2″W / 35.347056°N 81.170611°W / 35.347056; -81.170611Coordinates: 35°20′49.4″N 81°10′14.2″W / 35.347056°N 81.170611°W / 35.347056; -81.170611
Translator(s)W36FB-D Biscoe
W17EE-D Lilesville
Links
Public license information
Profile
LMS
Websitewww.wcnc.com

WCNC-TV, virtual channel 36 (UHF digital channel 24), is an NBC-affiliated television station licensed to Charlotte, North Carolina, United States. The station is owned by Tegna Inc. WCNC's studios are located in the Wood Ridge Center office complex off Billy Graham Parkway (Route 4), just east of the Billy Graham Library in south Charlotte, and its transmitter is located in north-central Gaston County. The station is generally carried on channel 6 on cable systems, though some cable providers, AT&T U-verse, and satellite providers use channel 36.

Channel 36 was established as an independent television station in 1967 and was run by Ted Turner throughout the 1970s. The station became Charlotte's NBC affiliate in 1978 and has generally been its third-rated television station since.

History[edit]

Prior use of channel 36 in Charlotte[edit]

The first station to operate on UHF channel 36 in Charlotte signed on the air January 5, 1954, as WAYS-TV;[2] that station was sold and changed its call letters to WQMC-TV on January 24, 1955.[3] Charlotte's second television station, WAYS-TV/WQMC-TV, did not make any headway against WBTV (channel 3) because television set manufacturers were not required to include UHF tuning capability at the time; this would not change until Congress passed the All-Channel Receiver Act in 1961. It ceased operations in March 1955.[4] A plan to return it to the air as WUTV under reconstituted ownership in 1957 was unsuccessful, but it aired educational programming from 1961[5] to 1963.[6] Cy Bahakel bought the station in 1964 and returned it to the air as WCCB, which broadcast on channel 36 before moving to UHF channel 18 in November 1966.[7]

Charlotte Telecasters era[edit]

The current incarnation of channel 36 signed on the air on July 9, 1967, as WCTU-TV.[8] Dr. Harold W. Twisdale, a dentist from Charlotte, and Washington, D.C.-based engineer David L. Steel were the leaders of the original ownership group, operating as Charlotte Telecasters Inc. (The station had intended to take the call letters WCTI, but citing potential confusion, local educational station WTVI successfully objected;[9] the U stood for UHF.[10]) WCTU was North Carolina's first independent station, beating Hickory-based WHKY-TV (channel 14) to the air by eight months.

Twisdale and Steel were the lead investors in other planned UHF stations; though construction permits were never built for stations in Memphis and Richmond and the group lost out on channel 28 in Durham, WCTU-TV and WATU-TV (later WAGT) in Augusta, Georgia, made it to air. WATU-TV was a profitable operation; in comparison, debts incurred in starting WCTU-TV would prompt Twisdale to shelve his Memphis and Richmond plans.[11]

WCTU was initially a low-budget independent station operating about eight hours a day from 3 pm to 11 pm. It ran a lineup of some very old movies, westerns, some comedy shows from the early 1950s, and public affairs shows.[12] The station, which operated from studios on Hood Road in the Hickory Grove neighborhood of Charlotte, had very modern equipment for the time and broadcast some shows and movies in color, as well as all of its local programming in color.[13]

The station hit hard times financially in 1969. In July, equipment supplier Ampex filed two lawsuits seeking $1.3 million from WCTU-TV for failing to pay for products it had purchased.[14] Film distributor National Telefilm Associates had also sued channel 36 for $80,000 for breaching a film rental contract.[15] That September, a court placed WCTU into receivership,[16] though it continued to broadcast.[17] Stating that "we feel there have been combined forces which hinder our operation", Twisdale foreshadowed a years-long antitrust case against the Jefferson-Pilot Corporation, owner of WBTV, which was not fully dismissed until 1977.[18]

The Turner turnaround[edit]

WRET-TV logo from the 1970s.

Channel 36 found a buyer in February 1970: Ted Turner, who purchased WCTU through Turner Broadcasting of North Carolina for $1.25 million. Turner had scouted out buying equipment from the bankrupt station but decided instead to buy the whole operation.[19] At the time, he owned just one other television property, Atlanta's WJRJ-TV, as well as three radio stations in other southeastern cities.[20] Turner renamed the station WRET-TV—using the initials of his full name, Robert Edward Turner III—in July[21] and instituted a new and expanded program lineup in August.[22] Just two programs, wrestling and the music video program The Now Explosion, were retained.[22]

WCNC-TV's former news logo, used from 1996 to 2006

Turner's new Charlotte station was not an immediate success. Programming costs were high relative to ratings. The station had just one on-air personality: announcer Bob Chesson, who as "Dead Ernest" hosted the station's block of horror films.[23] One Saturday morning in February 1972, Turner appeared on the station to appeal for contributions from viewers, saying that channel 36 had not broken even since he had purchased it.[24] The station drew $53,000 in donations, enough to help pay its bills, and also received interest from several new advertisers.[25] WRET-TV became a typical UHF independent, airing a lineup of cartoons, sitcoms, older movies, and a heavy slate of sporting events.[26] It was among the early carriers of The 700 Club, produced by the Christian Broadcasting Network;[27] at one point, the Charlotte area accounted for 15 percent of CBN's pledge contributions.[19]

WCNC-TV's news logo from 2006 to 2008.

By 1975, buoyed by a stronger film library, WRET-TV had emerged as the country's fifth-best independent station of 65 nationwide in audience share, per an analysis by Television/Radio Age, and was making a profit.[19] After five years of being independently operated from the rest of his Turner Communications Group, that company absorbed WRET-TV and its parent company later that year.[28] Late that year, Turner was making plans to uplink one of its two stations nationwide for distribution to cable providers. While Turner preferred to uplink his Atlanta flagship, by then renamed, WRET-TV was a backup in the event that the Federal Communications Commission did not relax rules that prevented the existence of superstations in top-25 television markets.[29] Channel 36 ended the year by announcing plans to repay the viewers whose contributions had saved it four years prior,[30] doing so in February 1976.[31] 3,600 contributors, who each had sent in from 25 cents to $200, received checks returning their money—with interest—from Turner.[32]

In 1976 and 1977, channel 36 became an even more aggressive buyer of programming, grabbing local rights to Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman from WSOC-TV and stepping in to run CBS coverage of NBA basketball when WBTV passed on the package; it also aired other network shows that Charlotte's affiliates preempted. It was airing on 148 cable systems in the Carolinas, Tennessee, and Virginia.[33] However, WRET-TV remained a laggard in news and public affairs programming. Its 15-minute sign-off newscast—the only such program on the station—was read by Bill Tush from headquarters in Atlanta and fed to Charlotte by telephone.[34]

From independent to NBC affiliate[edit]

In 1977, ABC announced that it had lured away WSOC-TV, a former NBC affiliate, to be its new outlet in the Charlotte market beginning July 1, 1978, replacing WCCB-TV. That decision set off a two-station showdown between WCCB and WRET for the NBC affiliation in Charlotte.[35] WCCB was seen as the favorite; unlike WRET, it had a functioning news department.[36] Sources at NBC were said to see channel 36 as their last option behind WCCB, with its stronger signal, and long-dominant WBTV, which the network was trying to woo from CBS to no avail.[37]

Turner, however, promised NBC to would spend $2.5 million on station improvements if the network moved its programming to WRET. Of that total, $1 million would go towards starting a full news department within one year; the proposed expansion would employ 22 people, compared to 26 at WSOC and 12 at WCCB.[38] On April 29, news broke that channel 36 had been selected for NBC affiliation, with the network preferring it to WCCB based on Turner's turnaround record with the station and his ownership of the Atlanta Braves and Atlanta Hawks.[39][9] With the decision, WCCB became an independent station.[40]

Two months after assuming the NBC affiliation, WRET launched its first newscasts in September, under the banner of "Action News"; Robert D. Raiford was the station's first news anchor.[41][42] The main news was presented at 7 pm, but the different time slot failed to attract viewers. Where WBTV had a 52 share and WSOC a 23 for their 6 pm newscasts, WRET could only pull a 5.[43] Bob Wisehart of the Charlotte News described WRET's news operation as "spend[ing] a great deal of effort going no place at all".[43] The same could have been said of the station, which was said to be barely breaking even after the switch.[44]

Group W era[edit]

Turner's ambitious and mostly successful ownership of the station would not last much longer after obtaining the NBC affiliation. By 1979, Turner was in the process of starting CNN, and he announced he would sell channel 36 to help raise the capital needed for the new venture.[45] On May 16, 1979, the sale of WRET-TV to Westinghouse Broadcasting (also known as Group W) was announced for $20 million, setting a then-record for a single UHF television station.[46] The news of a purchase by Group W, owner of regarded television and radio stations in other cities, was initially met with glee by the WRET-TV staff. Two station employees who had been looking for new jobs elsewhere decided to stay when the sale was announced.[44] In 1984, Reese Schonfeld, who co-founded CNN with Turner, would note that by providing the collateral against which Turner obtained money for CNN in the WRET-TV purchase, Westinghouse financed the start of CNN and then of its own Satellite News Channel two years later.[47]

Final approval of the sale was secured at the end of April 1980, when Westinghouse agreed to furnish $400,000 in grants and affirmative action programs in exchange for the withdrawal of a license renewal challenge by local civil rights groups; the Federal Communications Commission did find in their favor when it said the station did not employ enough minorities, renewing WRET-TV's license for a half-term of 18 months.[48] Some of the funds went to improve the journalism school at the historically Black Johnson C. Smith University.[49]

Westinghouse changed the station's call letters to WPCQ-TV, representing "People of the Carolinas and Queen City", on October 13; the station branded as "Q36". The move came alongside a major programming reshuffle and an increase in effective radiated power from 1.3 to 2.5 million watts.[50] The newscasts were moved from 6 and 11 pm to 5:30 pm and 12:30 am, and several new magazine shows were added.[51] The early newscast was then moved back to 6 pm, but WCCB, airing reruns of Good Times, drew 13 percent of the audience in May 1982 compared to the 2 percent that watched the WPCQ-TV newscast; the station was, again, losing money.[52] Westinghouse's inability to make channel 36 more competitive surprised even local rivals, who had expected the company to do more with the station.[52]

We spent a million dollars a year, 80 percent of it on the news, promoting the station since we took it over in 1980. But we never got over a 1 or 2 percent rating.

Laurence Freiberg, president of the television station division of Group W, on the 1982 downsizing of WPCQ-TV's local news operation[53]

In August 1982, the station made another programming change, this time attracting considerable national attention: it dropped its low-rated early evening newscast.[54] When it axed that program, it also decided to cease carrying the NBC Nightly News. This prompted NBC officials to shop the Nightly News to Charlotte's other stations, including WBTV.[53] The station continued with its noon newscast, as well as short news capsules throughout the day and occasional news specials.[55] Station officials blamed WPCQ-TV's signal, which—despite the power increase—was not strong enough to reach outer areas of the market that got better signals from WXII-TV in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and WIS-TV in Columbia, South Carolina.[53] For instance, much of the South Carolina side of the market got better reception from WIS, whose transmitter was 80 mi (130 km) south of Charlotte, even though WPCQ's signal was 26 mi (42 km) from the South Carolina line.

If this is Westinghouse's idea of how to run a television station, you wish they'd have stayed in the refrigerator business.

Mark Wolf, TV/radio columnist, The Charlotte Observer[56]

"Q36" became known for frequent preemptions of NBC network fare, including the soap opera Texas,[57] coverage of the 1984 Democratic National Convention,[58] and network sporting events.[59] It also delayed the David Brinkley-hosted NBC Magazine to midnight.[57] Even Westinghouse's own productions were not guaranteed an audience on the station; after two years of WPCQ-TV airing Hour Magazine, it moved to WBTV in 1982.[60]

By the fall of 1982, and for the rest of Group W's ownership, the station's programming lineup and on-air look resembled those of an independent station rather than a major-network affiliate. In addition to airing minimal news programming and heavily pre-empting NBC program, it ran a daytime and late afternoon lineup consisting mostly of syndicated cartoons (long after other Big Three affiliates in markets of Charlotte's size dropped cartoons from their daytime schedules) and reruns of sitcoms from the 1960s and 1970s.

Another problem facing the station had to do with Group W's human resources philosophy. Westinghouse had long extensively promoted from within, and used WPCQ as a farm system; its more promising on-air personalities had the prospect of promotion to other, more successful Group W stations.[52] When a union strike at the company's New York City all-news station WINS left it without announcers, Westinghouse sent WPCQ anchor Raiford there as part of a team of 20 employees from other Group W stations to keep it running.[61] Talent often left for vacancies elsewhere in the company, such as when sports director Lou Tilley moved to Boston to become the weekend sports anchor at WBZ-TV.[62] Amanda Davis, who had anchored the news three years for WPCQ-TV, became a correspondent for Group W's Satellite News Channel after turning down an offer to report for its Baltimore station, WJZ-TV.[63]

A new Odyssey[edit]

Four years after taking over WPCQ-TV, Odyssey Partners, a New York investment partnership headed by Michael Finkelstein, acquired WPCQ-TV in 1984.[64] For Westinghouse, the move was about focusing on major markets and shedding a station that was estimated to have lost $5 million in four years.[64] Mark Wolf, television and radio columnist for The Charlotte Observer, would note that elements that Group W had used successfully elsewhere had failed to make a dent against two formidable and entrenched competitors in Charlotte, and that the company seemed to lack other ideas when its typical plans did not work.[65]

When the sale closed in February 1985, Odyssey immediately announced the restoration of the NBC Nightly News to the station's schedule.[66] Later that year, talk began of the potential return of local newscasts, when station general manager Stan Rudick said that channel 36 was conducting market research on the idea.[67] In February 1986, the station announced it would return to producing evening newscasts.[68]

Following a $2 million investment, 5:30 and 11 pm news programs began airing September 8, 1986, anchored by former Atlanta newsman John McKnight and Karen Adams.[69] Ratings were low but exceeded the levels of Action News in the Group W era.[70] The original "36 News" early evening newscast expanded to an hour and became "News 36" in May 1988 in what amounted to a soft reboot of the operation.[71] The revamp brought a string of new faces, notably including weekend sports anchor Hannah Storm.[71]

Odyssey also implemented a technical overhaul for WPCQ-TV. In 1987, the station bought land north of Dallas to build a new tower near those owned by WBTV and newly built WJZY[72] and filed to increase power to the maximum 5 million watts.[73] After surviving an attempt by NBC to move its affiliation from channel 36,[74] in which NBC attempted to court both Charlotte VHF stations[75] and the new WJZY,[76] the new tower and stronger signal were activated in September 1988, giving WPCQ-TV signal parity with other Charlotte stations.[77]

Providence Journal[edit]

The Providence Journal Company purchased WPCQ-TV in 1988 for $30 million, marking its fourth television station purchase.[78][79]

ProJo immediately set out to build a new identity for the station. After initially pursuing the call letters WPJB-TV, formerly used by the Journal's Providence radio stations,[80] the station instead became WCNC-TV (for "Charlotte, North Carolina"[1]) on September 3, 1989. That same day, the station split its 5:30 p.m. news hour into two half-hour newscasts, and it also moved to cable channel 6 on most area systems.[81] The station also built new studios, costing $6.5 million,[82] on Billy Graham Parkway in the Wood Ridge office complex, where it would be joined by the new headquarters of the NBC News Channel affiliate service,[83][84] which general manager John Hayes had successfully lured to Charlotte.[85] ProJo also sprung for a new satellite truck, the only one in the market, and overnight ratings for the Charlotte market.[82] The early months of NBC Nightside, an NBC News Channel production, came from the new WCNC set.[82] Despite all the improvements, WCNC's news remained firmly in third.[86]

Beginning in 1996, the station was branded on-air as "NBC 6", in reference to its cable channel location; it quietly shed that moniker to go by its call letters in 2004, seeking to avoid potential confusion in ratings diaries.[87]

Belo ownership[edit]

Two veteran anchors are gone, news ratings are perennially low and national consultants say the NBC affiliate is among the network's most dubious underachievers.

Erik Spanberg, Charlotte Business Journal, on the state of WCNC-TV at the time of the Belo purchase[88]

In 1996, the Belo Corporation bought the Providence Journal Company.[89] The station suffered from two anchor departures in just over a week in early 1997 as Belo completed the purchase; meanwhile, its newscasts were still in third place.[90] Under new general manager Richard Keilty, WCNC lured Sonja Gantt, formerly of WBTV, back to the market from a stint in Chicago.[91] The station also got a new $200,000 news set as Belo sought to raise the station from its perennial cellar.[92]

The next year, Ray Boylan, a longtime meteorologist at WSOC-TV, unretired and did on-air reports on WCNC, while the station also hired Terri Bennett, who had been in the running to replace him on channel 9 but was passed over.[93] Boylan and Bennett were backed up by the station's purchase of a new Doppler radar and other weather equipment.[93] However, not all of the talent changes made were positively received; the ouster of Beatrice Thompson, who had been Charlotte's first full-time Black anchor at WBTV in the 1980s, led to protests by some viewers who felt she had been forced out because of her race.[94]

Boylan retired in December 2000.[95] The station showed momentum in local news ratings in the early 2000s, particularly in mornings and at 11,[96] and between 2000 and 2002, it produced a 10 p.m. newscast for WB affiliate WFVT-TV 55.[97]

On October 30, 2009, WCNC broke the record for most Halloween costume changes during a local news program, with 11 costumes worn by the station's anchor team (Jeff Campbell, Colleen Odegaard, and Larry Sprinkle, as well as producer Natalie Ridley) were involved in setting the record during its weekday morning newscast that day.[98]

Previous logo from 2014 until early-2020.

In 2008, after referring to itself simply with its call letters and using the slogan "Carolinas' News Connection", WCNC changed its branding to "NewsChannel 36", citing its over-the-air channel number and the coming arrival of digital television.[99] In 2012, the station's branding was changed once again to "NBC Charlotte"; this time, the reasoning for the change was that few people actually watched the station over-the-air or on satellite on virtual channel 36.[100]

Gannett/Tegna ownership[edit]

On June 13, 2013, the Gannett Company announced that it would acquire Belo for $1.5 billion.[101] The sale was finalized on December 23.[102] Investments made by Gannett in WCNC after the Belo purchase included the conversion of newscasts to high definition and a new computer system for the newsroom.[103]

On June 29, 2015, Gannett split in two, with one side specializing in print media and the other side specializing in broadcast and digital media. WCNC was retained by the latter company, named Tegna.[104]

Newscasts[edit]

WCNC-TV presently broadcasts 40½ hours of locally produced newscasts each week (with 6½ hours each weekday, and four hours each on Saturdays and Sundays); in addition, the station produces the hour-long entertainment and lifestyle program Charlotte Today, which airs weekday mornings at 11:00 am and was started in 2010.[105]

After a solid, if low-rated start under Turner's watch,[42] the news department was severely hamstrung by Group W's bargain-basement approach to running the station. Group W immediately dropped the station's weekend evening newscasts and moved the 11 pm newscast to 12:30 am before canceling it altogether in 1981. The early evening newscast was shifted between the 5:30 and 6 pm timeslots until the fall of 1982, when it was canceled as well. For the remainder of Group W's ownership, the station's only remaining local news programming consisted of a half-hour newscast at noon, hourly cut-ins, five-minute local inserts during Today, a weekly magazine program and occasional specials.[55]

After Odyssey Partners bought the station, the noon newscast was discontinued in the spring of 1985. In September 1986, WPCQ relaunched a full-fledged news department.[69] At first, the station scheduled its early-evening newscast for 5:30 pm, knowing at the time that it could not hope to compete with WBTV and WSOC-TV at 6 pm. In 1988, WPCQ expanded the 5:30 newscast to one hour and added a 6:00 pm newscast on weekends.[71] After becoming WCNC, the station added a distinct 6 pm newscast to the weeknight schedule.[81] Under Belo, the station expanded further into new timeslots in the late 1990s, including a 5:00 am morning show, unusual at the time.[106]

In 1999, the station's news department was chronicled in the five-part PBS documentary series Local News.[94] That same year, WCNC entered into a news share agreement with then-Fox affiliate WCCB to take over production of that station's 10:00 p.m. newscast, shortly after WSOC-TV ended its agreement to produce the program after WCCB announced it would launch its own news department. After WCCB's in-house news operation launched in 2000, WCNC began airing a 10:00 p.m. newscast on WB affiliate WWWB (channel 55, now WMYT-TV), which ran until the program was canceled due to low ratings in 2002.[107] The station won a Peabody Award in 2003, the first for a Charlotte television station in 27 years, for an investigation into dental care through Medicaid[108] and attracted notice in the market for its award-winning ways.[109]

For much of the 2000s, WCNC had waged a spirited battle with WBTV for second place behind WSOC-TV. though it would later return to a distant third place in most timeslots as the performance of the NBC network in the late 2000s and poor daytime syndicated offerings dragged it down. In recent years, WCNC has attracted most of its viewership in the market's urban core, including Charlotte itself; WBTV dominates the western part of the market while WSOC-TV leads the way in the eastern portion.[110] This continued in the February 2016 sweeps, when its evening newscasts drew barely half the viewership of WBTV.[111]

In late 2005, WCNC debuted the Charlotte market's first 4:30 pm newscast, creating a two-hour local news block from 4:30 to 6:30 pm.[112] In 2007, the station phased out its longtime 6News brand and rebranded itself as "WCNC, Carolinas' News Connection". In August 2008, it rebranded once again to NewsChannel 36, marking the first time in 12 years that WCNC had used its over-the-air channel number in its branding. Beginning in September 2008, WCNC aired news at 4:00 pm, with Judge Judy at 4:30; in January 2012, the 4:00 news expanded to an hour and the noon news shrank from an hour to 30 minutes.[113]

On May 18, 2009, WCNC began broadcasting its local newscasts in 16:9 widescreen standard definition; this change came alongside the revamping of the station's on-air news graphics. A conversion to full high definition followed on June 28, 2014.[103]

Notable current on-air staff[edit]

Notable former on-air staff[edit]

Technical information[edit]

Subchannels[edit]

The station's signal is multiplexed:

Channel Video Aspect PSIP Short Name Programming[119]
36.1 1080i 16:9 WCNC-HD Main WCNC-TV programming / NBC
36.2 480i Crime True Crime Network
36.3 CourtTV Court TV
36.4 Quest Quest
36.5 Twist Twist
64.4 Laff Laff

Prior subchannel offerings from WCNC have included NBC Weather Plus[120] and the Live Well Network.[121]

WCNC-TV was added to Charlotte's ATSC 3.0 (NextGen TV) deployment on WAXN-TV on July 7, 2021.[122] As part of the change, WAXN's 64.4 subchannel of Laff was placed on WCNC-TV's multiplex, keeping it available in ATSC 1.0 format.

Analog-to-digital conversion[edit]

WCNC-TV shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 36, on June 12, 2009, the official date on which full-power television stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate.[123] The station's digital signal remained on its pre-transition UHF channel 22.[124] Through the use of PSIP, digital television receivers display the station's virtual channel as its former UHF analog channel 36.

WCNC-TV moved its digital signal from channel 22 to channel 24 on September 6, 2019, as part of the FCC's spectrum reallocation process.[125][126][127]

Translators[edit]

City of license Callsign Channel ERP HAAT Facility ID Transmitter coordinates
Biscoe W36FB-D 36 6.9 kW 61 m (200 ft) 32317 35°16′36.5″N 79°50′01.1″W / 35.276806°N 79.833639°W / 35.276806; -79.833639 (W36FB-D)
Lilesville W17EE-D 17 6 kW 120 m (394 ft) 32316 35°01′09.5″N 79°56′49.2″W / 35.019306°N 79.947000°W / 35.019306; -79.947000 (W17EE-D)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ "New Charlotte TV Station Goes On Air". The Charlotte Observer. January 6, 1954. p. 13-A. Archived from the original on March 13, 2021. Retrieved February 19, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
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  9. ^ a b Wister, Emery (April 29, 1978). "Station's lived Cinderella life". The Charlotte News. pp. 1A, 2A. Archived from the original on March 28, 2021. Retrieved December 17, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Channel 36 Will Seek WCTU As Call Letters". The Charlotte Observer. May 17, 1966. p. 14A. Archived from the original on March 28, 2021. Retrieved December 20, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ Jackson, Dot (August 20, 1969). "WTCU [sic] Owner Fights Debts To Stay On Air". The Charlotte Observer. p. 6C. Archived from the original on March 29, 2021. Retrieved December 26, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "WCTU-TV Goes On Air July 9 at 3". The Charlotte Observer. June 28, 1967. p. 4A. Archived from the original on March 13, 2021. Retrieved December 17, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "WCTU-TV In Ultra Color". The Charlotte News. September 11, 1967. p. 2C. Archived from the original on March 13, 2021. Retrieved December 17, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ Monts, Vivian (July 3, 1969). "WCTU TV Faces Suits". The Charlotte News. p. 5A. Archived from the original on March 13, 2021. Retrieved December 17, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ Flanders, Joe (August 18, 1969). "Financial Woes: Court Gives WCTU 30 Days". The Charlotte News. p. 1B. Archived from the original on March 13, 2021. Retrieved December 17, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ Flanders, Joe (September 16, 1969). "WCTU-TV Declared Insolvent". The Charlotte News. p. 2A. Archived from the original on March 13, 2021. Retrieved December 17, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Jackson, Dot. "Channel 36 In Receivership". The Charlotte Observer. p. 14A. Archived from the original on March 13, 2021. Retrieved December 20, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Judge Throws Out Suit By Defunct TV Station". The Charlotte Observer. October 19, 1977. p. 3D. Archived from the original on March 28, 2021. Retrieved December 20, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
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