WFYX

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WFYX
City Walpole, New Hampshire
Broadcast area Monadnock Region, Lebanon-Rutland-White River Junction
Branding Kool 106.7 and 96.3
Slogan True Oldies
Frequency 96.3 MHz
(also on HD Radio via WHDQ-HD2)
Translator(s) 106.7 W294AB (Hanover, relays WHDQ-HD2)
First air date February 2001 (2001-02) (as WLPL)
Format Oldies
ERP 320 watts
HAAT 124 meters (407 ft)
Class A
Facility ID 23307
Transmitter coordinates 43°8′14.00″N 72°25′59.00″W / 43.1372222°N 72.4330556°W / 43.1372222; -72.4330556Coordinates: 43°8′14.00″N 72°25′59.00″W / 43.1372222°N 72.4330556°W / 43.1372222; -72.4330556
Former callsigns WLPL (1991–2001)
WCFR-FM (2001–2005)
WPLY-FM (2005–2008)
Affiliations The True Oldies Channel
Owner Great Eastern Radio, LLC
Sister stations WEEY, WGXL, WHDQ, WKKN, WTHK, WTSL, WTSV, WXXK
Webcast Listen Live
Website river1067.com

WFYX (96.3 FM, "Kool") is a radio station broadcasting an oldies music format supplied by Scott Shannon's True Oldies Channel. Licensed to Walpole, New Hampshire, United States, it serves the Monadnock Region in Southwestern New Hampshire and Southeastern Vermont. It first began broadcasting in 2001 under the call sign WLPL. The station is owned by Great Eastern Radio. Programming is simulcast with the second HD Radio channel of WHDQ (106.1 FM) in Claremont and translator W294AB (106.7 FM) in Hanover, which serve the Lebanon-Rutland-White River Junction area.

History[edit]

96.3 FM went on the air in January 2001 as WLPL, owned by Gary Savoie and simulcasting Vox Radio Group-owned oldies station WWOD (104.3 FM).[1] WLPL's sign on was delayed when environmental objections prevented the station from building a tower in Athens, Vermont;[2][3] it chose to transmit from an existing tower in New Hampshire.[1] The call letters were changed to WCFR-FM on October 19, shortly after they were dropped from WXKK (93.5 FM, now WEEY);[4][5] soon afterward, Savoie sold the station to Vox.[6] Nassau Broadcasting Partners acquired most of Vox's northern New England radio stations, including WCFR and WWOD, in 2004.[7] WCFR-FM's call letters were changed to WPLY-FM on October 12, 2005, then to WFYX on October 7, 2008.[4]

WFYX, WWOD, and 28 other Nassau stations in northern New England were purchased at bankruptcy auction by Carlisle Capital Corporation, a company controlled by Bill Binnie (owner of WBIN-TV in Derry), on May 22, 2012. The stations, and 11 of the other stations, were then acquired by Vertical Capital Partners, controlled by Great Eastern Radio owner Jeff Shapiro. As this would put Shapiro over the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) ownership limits in the Lebanon-Rutland-White River Junction market, WWOD and WEXP were acquired by Electromagnetic Company, a company controlled by William and Gail Goddard; WFYX was not included in that transaction.[8][9][10] As a result, on December 1, 2012, WFYX began to simulcast classic hits station WMXR (93.9 FM, now WWOD), while 104.3 FM left the air[11] (that station is now WJKS in Keeseville, New York). The Vertical Capital Partners stations were transferred to Great Eastern Radio on January 1, 2013.[12][13]

On January 9, 2013 WFYX was granted an FCC construction permit to increase ERP to 600 watts. On July 7, 2016, Dartmouth College announced that WWOD and WFYX would be the new carriers of Big Green men's and women's basketball broadcasts as part of the Big Green Sports Network / Learfield Sports.[14]

On November 1, 2017, Great Eastern Radio transferred the "Kool FM" programming, which by then had shifted to an oldies format provided by Scott Shannon's True Oldies Channel, from WWOD to WHDQ-HD2 and W294AB; the format continues to simulcast on WFYX.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fybush, Scott (January 15, 2001). "Citadel, WROL, and WKOX -- Sold!". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved August 3, 2009. 
  2. ^ Fybush, Scott (May 22, 1997). "Back to Boston". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  3. ^ Fybush, Scott (June 5, 1997). "ARS Grows Again". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Fybush, Scott (October 29, 2001). "North East RadioWatch". Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Call Sign History (WFYX)". CDBS Public Access. Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  6. ^ Fybush, Scott (November 5, 2001). "Doing the Albany Shuffle". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Nassau Will Buy 10 Vox Stations in New England". Radio World. March 16, 2004. Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Carlisle Capital Corp. Wins Bidding For Rest Of Nassau Stations". All Access. May 22, 2012. Retrieved May 22, 2012. 
  9. ^ Venta, Lance (May 22, 2012). "Nassau Broadcasting Auction Results". RadioInsight. Retrieved June 16, 2012.  (updated June 14, 2012)
  10. ^ "Jeff Shapiro spins off two former Nassau FMs to "Electromagnetic"". Radio-Info.com. June 15, 2012. Retrieved June 16, 2012. 
  11. ^ Venta, Lance (December 1, 2012). "Northern New England Change Rundown". RadioInsight. Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  12. ^ "APPLICATION FOR CONSENT TO ASSIGN BROADCAST STATION CONSTRUCTION PERMIT OR LICENSE OR TO TRANSFER CONTROL OF ENTITY HOLDING BROADCAST STATION CONSTRUCTION PERMIT OR LICENSE". CDBS Public Access. Federal Communications Commission. December 11, 2012. Retrieved June 8, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Consummation Notice". CDBS Public Access. Federal Communications Commission. January 4, 2013. Retrieved June 8, 2013. 
  14. ^ http://www.dartmouthsports.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=11600&ATCLID=211056403
  15. ^ Great Eastern Shuffles in Hanover/Lebanon, NH Radioinsight - November 7, 2017

External links[edit]