WHAZ-FM

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WHAZ-FM
City Hoosick Falls, New York
Broadcast area Eastern New York and Southwestern Vermont
Slogan Alive Radio
Frequency 97.5 MHz
Translator(s) See § Translators
First air date July 4, 1991 (as WNGN)
Format Religious
ERP 420 watts
HAAT 361 meters (1,184 ft)
Class A
Facility ID 6765
Transmitter coordinates 42°51′49.00″N 73°13′59.00″W / 42.8636111°N 73.2330556°W / 42.8636111; -73.2330556
Callsign meaning see WHAZ
Former callsigns WNGN (1991-1998)
WZEC (1998-2005)
Owner Capital Media Corporation
Sister stations WHAZ
Website aliveradionetwork.com

WHAZ-FM (97.5 FM) is a radio station broadcasting a religious format.[1] Licensed to Hoosick Falls, New York, United States, the station serves the easternmost portion of the Capital District, Bennington, Vermont, and North Adams, Massachusetts as a satellite of WHAZ. The station is owned by Capital Media Corporation.[2]

History[edit]

The station signed on July 4, 1991 as WNGN, a gospel station owned by Northeast Gospel Broadcasting.[3] The station was sold to Aritaur Communications in 1998,[4] who renamed the station WZEC with the intention of implementing a simulcast of Pittsfield top 40 station WBEC-FM (then at 105.5, now WWEI; now on 95.9).[5] WNGN's programming was then merged into WNGX (91.9), which took the WNGN call letters.[4][5] However, WNGN continued to run WZEC well into 1999, as the sale did not close until June 30; the next day, Aritaur sold WZEC, along with WBEC and WBEC-FM, to Tele-Media Broadcasting,[6] who finally implemented the WBEC-FM simulcast by that September.[7] By the following May, the station had again changed format, this time to a modern adult contemporary format, "The Point", modeled on sister stations WCPT (100.9; now WKLI-FM) and WKBE (then at 100.3, now WFFG-FM; now on 107.1).[8][9] The station was sold to Vox Media in 2002,[10] and shifted to soft adult contemporary in 2004.[11]

Vox sold WZEC to Capitol Media in 2005,[12] who changed the call letters to the current WHAZ-FM and implemented a classic gospel format on November 7,[13][14] before switching to the simulcast of WHAZ by April 2007.[15]

Translators[edit]

Call sign Frequency
(MHz)
City of license Facility
ID
ERP
W
Height
m (ft)
Class Transmitter coordinates FCC info
W240AK 95.9 Lebanon, New Hampshire 6771 8 76 m (249 ft) D 43°37′18″N 72°15′15″W / 43.62167°N 72.25417°W / 43.62167; -72.25417 (W240AK) FCC
W288AN 105.5 Brattleboro, Vermont 26371 95 38 m (125 ft) D 42°49′55″N 72°36′2″W / 42.83194°N 72.60056°W / 42.83194; -72.60056 (W288AN) FCC

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "WHAZ-FM Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. 
  2. ^ "Station Information Profile". Arbitron. 
  3. ^ Pinckney, Barbara (January 24, 1997). "Willis changes local station to African-American gospel". The Business Review. American City Business Journals. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 'When we signed on with WNGN, on July 4, 1991, we were the first 24-hour gospel station in the region.' 
  4. ^ a b Pinckney, Barbara (April 13, 1998). "Gospel station shifts position as broadcaster buys frequency". The Business Review. American City Business Journals. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  5. ^ a b Fybush, Scott (July 30, 1998). "Sorrentino Out at WPRO". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  6. ^ Pinckney, Barbara (July 12, 1999). "Former Hoosick Falls radio station WNGN FM to be sold a second time". The Business Review. American City Business Journals. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  7. ^ Fybush, Scott (September 17, 1999). "Hello, Floyd!". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  8. ^ Fybush, Scott (May 26, 2000). "WMOU Goes Silent, and, Can a Kiss Hurt a Fly?". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  9. ^ Fybush, Scott (May 26, 2000). "CRTC Picks Three in Toronto". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  10. ^ Fybush, Scott (July 29, 2002). "Vox buys WBEC (Really!)". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  11. ^ Fybush, Scott (September 27, 2004). "Rhode Islanders Fight WRNI Sale". NorthEast Radio Watch. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  12. ^ Fybush, Scott (April 18, 2005). "Boston's Star Flips to "Mike"". NorthEast Radio Watch. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  13. ^ Fybush, Scott (September 5, 2005). "Hall Buys Big in Burlington". NorthEast Radio Watch. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  14. ^ Fybush, Scott (November 14, 2005). "Newton Poised to Approve New Towers". NorthEast Radio Watch. Retrieved September 14, 2011. 
  15. ^ Fybush, Scott (April 2, 2007). "Hornell's WKPQ Changes Hands - Maybe". NorthEast Radio Watch. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 

External links[edit]