WJNL

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WJNL
CityKingsley, Michigan
Broadcast areaTraverse City, Michigan
BrandingWJML News Radio
SloganNorthern Michigan's Information Station
Frequency1210 kHz
Translator(s)101.1 W266CS (Traverse City)
First air dateApril 17, 1947[1]
FormatNews-talk
Power50,000 watts (Daytime)
2,500 watts (Critical Hours)
ClassD
Facility ID4599
Transmitter coordinates44°33′32″N 85°35′35″W / 44.559°N 85.593°W / 44.559; -85.593Coordinates: 44°33′32″N 85°35′35″W / 44.559°N 85.593°W / 44.559; -85.593
Former callsignsWKNX (1947[2]-1997)[3]
WJZZ (1997-2001)[3]
WLDR (2001-2002)[3]
WWJR (1/24/02-5/3/02)[3]
WLDR (2002-2007)[3]
OwnerMitten News LLC
WebcastListen Live
Websitewjml.com

WJNL (1210 AM) is a radio station airing a news-talk format, licensed to Kingsley, Michigan and serving the Traverse City area.[4] The station is owned by Mitten News LLC, and is part of a simulcast with 1110 WJML in Petoskey, Michigan, WHAK 960 in Rogers City, Michigan, WWMN 106.3 in Thompsonville, Michigan, and WYPV 94.5 in Mackinaw City, Michigan. The station is also rebroadcast on 101.1 FM, through a translator in Traverse City, Michigan.

History[edit]

WKNX in Saginaw[edit]

The station began broadcasting April 17, 1947, holding the call sign WKNX, and was licensed to Saginaw, Michigan.[1][2] The station was owned by Lake Huron Broadcasting.[2][5] The station ran 1,000 watts, during daytime hours only.[2] In 1960, the station's power was increased to 10,000 watts.[2] In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, the station aired a country music format.[6][7][8] By 1964, the station was airing a top 40 format.[9] The station would become an affiliate of American Top 40.[10] By the late 1970s, the station was airing a MOR format.[11] In 1978, the station was sold to Radiocom for $600,000.[12][2] By 1980, the station was again airing a top 40 format.[13]

By the mid 1980s, the station would begin airing an oldies format.[14][15] In 1993, the station was sold to Bell Broadcasting for $270,000.[16] Bell Broadcasting intended to take the station off the air so that 1200 WCHB in Detroit could increase power.[17] In 1997, the station's oldies format and call sign were moved to 1250 WJZZ, and the station was taken silent, with its call sign changed to WJZZ.[18][3] That year, the station was granted a construction permit to move to Kingsley, Michigan and increase its daytime power to 50,000 watts (2,500 watts critical hours).[19]

After move to Kingsley[edit]

The station returned to the air in July 1999, after having been moved to Kingsley, Michigan, airing an urban oldies format, before again being silent in November of that year.[5] It would return to the air in October 2000, again airing an urban oldies format, but again being taken silent in January 2001.[5] In 2001, the station was sold to Fort Bend Broadcasting for $225,000.[20][5] The station returned to the air in February 2001 airing an oldies format, with its format being changed to talk in March of that year, as an affiliate of Michigan Talk Radio Network for most of the day, but airing the audio of CNN Headline News during the afternoon drive.[5][21][22] In August 2001, the station's call sign was changed to WLDR.[3] In January 2002, the station's call sign was changed to WWJR, and in May 2002 it was changed back to WLDR.[3]

In 2004, the station adopted a classic country format.[5][23] In 2007, Fort Bend Broadcasting exchanged the station for 750 WWKK in Petoskey, Michigan and $244,000 in cash, with Stone Communications taking ownership of 1210 WLDR.[5][24] In April 2007, the station's call sign was changed to WJNL, and the station would begin simulcasting the talk programming of 1110 WJML in Petoskey, Michigan.[3][5][25][26] In 2017, Mitten News LLC purchased the station, along with 1110 WJML, for $700,000.[27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 1971 Broadcasting Yearbook, Broadcasting, 1971. p. B-107. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f History Cards for WJNL, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  4. ^ WJNL-AM 1210 kHz, radio-locator.com. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h WJNL AM 1210 Kingsley/Traverse City, Michiguide.com. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  6. ^ "C&W Booms in Saginaw Area", Billboard, February 9, 1960. p. 3. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  7. ^ "Favorite Folk Disk Jockey", Billboard, October 22, 1949. p. 101. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  8. ^ "Folk Talent and Tunes", Billboard, August 27, 1949. p. 33. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  9. ^ "WKNX-Radio Powervoice 1210 Big Ten Survey", WKNX. October 10, 1964. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  10. ^ "There Just May Be a Hundred Reasons Why This Weekly Three-Hour Program Gets Bigger and Bigger, Market After Market", Billboard, February 6, 1971. p. 39. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  11. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1977, Broadcasting, 1977. p. C-108. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  12. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting, May 29, 1978. p. 32. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  13. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1980, Broadcasting, 1980. p. C-117. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  14. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1984, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1984. p. B-133. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  15. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1986, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1986. p. B-146. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  16. ^ "Transactions", Radio & Records, November 5, 1993. p. 10. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  17. ^ "Elsewhere", The M Street Journal. Vol. 11 No. 21. May 25, 1994. p. 8. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  18. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14 No. 6. February 12, 1997. p. 2. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  19. ^ "Facilities/Parameters: Grants", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14 No. 23. June 11, 1997. p. 6. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  20. ^ "AMs", Broadcasting & Cable, February 18, 2001. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  21. ^ "2001 Michigan Broadcasting News Highlights", Michiguide.com. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  22. ^ The M Street Radio Directory. 2001-2002. p. 294. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  23. ^ The M Street Radio Directory. 2004-2005. p. 306. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  24. ^ Station Exchange Agreement, fcc.gov. February 7, 2007. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  25. ^ The Radio Book. 2007-2008. p. 313. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  26. ^ "WELCOME to all our new listeners on the new AM-1210". WJML. Archived from the original on June 17, 2007. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  27. ^ "Company buys WJML, WJNL", Traverse City Record-Eagle. February 16, 2017. Retrieved August 14, 2018.

External links[edit]