WPNA-FM

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
WPNA-FM
WPNA station logo.png
CityHighland Park, Illinois
Broadcast areaChicago metropolitan area
Frequency103.1 MHz
First air dateAugust 15, 1963 (as WEEF-FM)[1]
FormatPolish/International CHR
ERP6,000 watts
HAAT100 meters (330 ft)
ClassA
Facility ID74177
Transmitter coordinates42°8′14.00″N 87°58′57.00″W / 42.1372222°N 87.9825000°W / 42.1372222; -87.9825000
Callsign meaningPolish National Alliance
Former callsignsWEEF-FM (1963-1973)[2]
WVVX-FM (1973-1977)[2]
WVVX (1977[2]-1998)[3]
WXXY-FM (1998-2003)[3]
WVIV-FM (2003-2017)[3]
WVIX (2017)[3]
OwnerThe Polish National Alliance
(Alliance Radio, LLC)
Sister stationsWPNA
Websitewpna.fm

WPNA-FM is a Polish radio station in Chicago, Illinois. It is owned by The Polish National Alliance, through licensee Alliance Radio, LLC. The station is licensed to Highland Park, Illinois and its transmitter is located in Arlington Heights.

History[edit]

Construction permit[edit]

The construction permit for the 103.1 FM frequency was issued to North Suburban Radio on November 23, 1960, bearing the WHPK callsign (soon changed to WNSH-FM).[2] The station's transmitter would be located in Deerfield, Illinois with an ERP of 1,000 watts at a HAAT of 120 feet.[2] By the time the station came on the air, its call sign was changed to WEEF-FM.[2]

MOR era[edit]

The station began broadcasting August 15, 1963, simulcasting with AM 1430 WEEF.[2][4] WEEF's call sign stood for "Eli E. Fink", the station's original owner.[5][4][6] Both stations aired a middle-of-the-road (MOR) format.[7][8] In December 1967, both stations were sold to Unique Radio for $350,000.[9][6][2]

Progressive rock era[edit]

In July 1972, both stations changed formats to progressive rock.[7] Among the air personalities during this time were Ed Walker, Dale Scott, Lori Rhinegold, Paul Knutson, and Mike Megaris.[7] Both stations were sold to Vanguard Communications for $290,000 in spring of 1973, and the station's call sign was changed to WVVX-FM.[2][10] In 1975, the station's ERP was increased to 3,000 watts and its HAAT was increased to 150 feet.[2]

Brokered programming[edit]

By 1977, the station had adopted a brokered ethnic format, airing a high amount of German language programming.[4][11] In autumn 1977, the station was sold to Universal Broadcasting for $183,750.[2][12][13][14][15] By 1979 the station was primarily airing oldies music, along with some religious and ethnic programming.[4][16]

In 1982, the station's transmitter was moved to Highland Park, Illinois and its HAAT was increased to 245 feet.[2][17][18]

Throughout the 1980s and until 1998, the station aired brokered ethnic programming, along with a few religious programs.[19][5][14][15][20][21] On May 11, 1985, the station began airing the heavy metal/hard rock program Real Precious Metal overnights.[22] The station continued airing Real Precious Metal until 1993, when the program moved to 107.9 WYSY.[20]

In 1992, the station was sold to Douglas Broadcasting for $3.7 million.[23][24]

Big City Radio ownership[edit]

In 1997, WVVX was sold to Big City Radio for $9.5 million.[25][26] Big City Radio also purchased co-channel WJDK 103.1 in Morris, Illinois (now WCSJ-FM).[26] In February 1998, the station's call sign was changed to WXXY, and the two stations adopted a rhythmic oldies format known as "Chicago's Heart and Soul."[3][26][21]

Logo as The Eighties Channel

In 1999, the station's transmitter was moved to its current location in Arlington Heights, Illinois, and its ERP was increased to 6,000 watts at a HAAT of 100 meters.[27][28][29]

Citing difficulties in competing with WUBT "103.5 The Beat", which had recently switched to a rhythmic oldies format, the station changed formats on August 6, 1999.[30][31] WXXY and WYXX adopted an '80s hits format as "The Eighties Channel," with the station patterned on high-energy CHR stations of the 1980s.[30][31][32] The first song was "Video Killed the Radio Star" by The Buggles.[33] The station featured longtime Chicago area radio personalities including Robert Murphy, Fred Winston, and Mark Zander.[30][32]

Spanish language era[edit]

Logo as Viva 103.1

In November 2000, Chicago's 94.7 FM adopted a 1980s music format as WZZN "The Zone", which prompted WXXY to change formats.[34][35] On January 29, 2001, after playing "Never Say Goodbye" by Bon Jovi, WXXY/WYXX adopted a Spanish hits format, branded as "Viva 103.1".[36][37][38][39] The station's simulcast with 103.1 WYXX in Morris was ended by January 2003, with WYXX adopting a Dance Hits format as "Party 103.1".[40] WXXY began to be simulcast on AM 1200 WLXX.[40] On January 16, 2003, WXXY's call sign was changed to WVIV-FM, while 1200 WLXX's call sign was changed to WVIV.[3][41]

In summer 2003, the station was sold to Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation for $32.9 million.[42][43][44] Shortly thereafter, Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation purchased adult-contemporary station WJTW 93.5 ("Star 93.5") in Joliet and it began simulcasting WVIV-FM, with its call sign being changed to WVIX.[45][46][47]

In July 2005, WVIV-FM/WVIX flipped formats to Hurban as "La Kalle".[48][49][50]

In 2009, the WVIV-FM/WVIX simulcast adopted a Spanish oldies format branded "Recuerdo 103.1/93.5".[50][51]

On July 1, 2011, the WVIV-FM/WVIX simulcast changed their format back to Hurban, branded as "La Kalle 103.1/93.5" after the format moved from WPPN 106.7 FM, which flipped to Spanish AC as "Pasion 106.7".[50][51]

Logo as Latino Mix

On December 12, 2011, the WVIV-FM/WVIX simulcast was rebranded as "Maxima 103.1/93.5", as its format shifted towards Spanish CHR.[50][52][53][54] The station's branding would later be changed to "Latino Mix 103.1/93.5".[54][55][56]

On May 25, 2017, Univision announced that 103.1 would break off the simulcast and be sold to Polish National Alliance for $5.5 million.[56][57] A condition of the sale was 93.5 WVIX completing its move to the Oakbrook Terrace Tower, where it would operate with an ERP of 3.5 kW at an HAAT of 133 meters.[56][57] On June 16, 2017, WVIV-FM and WVIX swapped calls.[3]

WPNA-FM[edit]

The acquisition by The Polish National Alliance was consummated on August 31, 2017, and the station changed its call sign from WVIX to WPNA-FM.[58][3] The station began airing a mix of Polish and international contemporary hits.[59][60]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1971 Broadcasting Yearbook, Broadcasting, 1971. p. B-64. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l History Cards for WPNA-FM, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d Ghrist, John R. (1996). Valley Voices: A Radio History. Crossroads Communications. p. 337-339.
  5. ^ a b Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988/Spring-Summer 1989. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  6. ^ a b "Changing hands", Broadcasting. January 8, 1968. p. 44. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  7. ^ a b c Duston, Anne. "Vet Windy City MOR Station to Progressive", Billboard. July 29, 1972. pp. 16, 35. Retrieved January 10, 2019.
  8. ^ "Stations By Format", Billboard. October 16, 1965. p. 62. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  9. ^ "For the Record", Broadcasting. January 15, 1968. p. 81. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  10. ^ "Ownership changes", Broadcasting. February 12, 1973. p. 90. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  11. ^ 1977 Broadcasting Yearbook, Broadcasting, 1977. p. C-64. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  12. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting. August 1, 1977. p. 30. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  13. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 1981, Broadcasting & Cable, 1981. p. C-71. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  14. ^ a b Kening, Dan. "Narrowcasters", Chicago Tribune. June 4, 1991. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  15. ^ a b Hart, Marla. "Heavy Metal In a Heady Mix", Chicago Tribune. May 3, 1992. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  16. ^ "Stations, everywhere: a listeners' guide to the AM and FM bands", Chicago Tribune Magazine. March 4, 1979. p. 37. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  17. ^ Public Notice Comment - BPH-19790718AE, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  18. ^ Public Notice Comment - BLH-19820922AI, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  19. ^ Chicago Radio Guide. Vol. 1, No. 1. May 1985. p. 3. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  20. ^ a b "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 10, No. 5. February 3, 1993. p. 1. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  21. ^ a b "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 15, No. 5. February 4, 1998. p. 1. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  22. ^ Brogan, Daniel. "Meek Radio Signal Inherits Heavy-Metal Beat", Chicago Tribune. May 29, 1986. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  23. ^ "Ownership Changes", Broadcasting & Cable. May 4, 1992. p. 78. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  24. ^ Public Notice Comment - BTCH-19920124HY, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  25. ^ "Special Report", Broadcasting & Cable. February 2, 1998. pp. 53 & 56. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  26. ^ a b c Hart, Marla. "Changing channels: WVVX is WXXY. Why? Because...", Chicago Tribune. March 22, 1998. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  27. ^ Federal Communications Commission FM Broadcast Station Construction Permit, fcc.gov. June 30, 1999. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  28. ^ Federal Communications Commission FM Broadcast Station License, fcc.gov. August 18, 1999. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  29. ^ Application Search Details - BLH-19990730KB, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019
  30. ^ a b c "Big City /Chicago Drops 'Soul' For '80s", Radio & Records. August 13, 1999. pp. 3 & 20. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  31. ^ a b "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 16, No. 32. August 11, 1999. p. 1. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  32. ^ a b "The Eighties Channel 103.1FM WXXY Chicago: Staff". WXXY. Archived from the original on April 8, 2000. Retrieved January 11, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  33. ^ "WXXY/WYXX Become 'The 80's Channel', Format Change Archive. Retrieved February 13, 2019.
  34. ^ "Elsewhere", The M Street Journal. Vol. 18, No. 02. January 10, 2001. p. 6. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  35. ^ Rodkin, Dennis. "Who Can it Be Now?", Chicago Tribune. April 22, 2001. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  36. ^ WXXY Becomes Viva 103.1
  37. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 18, No. 05. January 31, 2001. p. 2. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  38. ^ Devine, Cathy (2002). The M Street Radio Directory. Eleventh Edition. p. 192. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  39. ^ "Viva 103.1 FM". Viva 103.1. Archived from the original on December 18, 2002. Retrieved January 12, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  40. ^ a b "Formats You'll Flip Over", Radio & Records. January 17, 2003. p. 21. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  41. ^ Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  42. ^ "Big City to Sell Chicago FM Directly to HBC", Radio & Records. May 16, 2003. pp. 4 & 6. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  43. ^ Application Search Details - BALH-20030505ABG, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  44. ^ Public Notice Comment - BALH-20030505ABG, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  45. ^ "HBC Scores Again in Chicago", Radio & Records. May 9, 2003. p. 4. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  46. ^ "Radio Active", Airplay Monitor. October 3, 2003. p. 3. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  47. ^ Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  48. ^ Philipp, Sven (July 11, 2005). "Chicago's 'Viva' Becomes 'La Kalle'". Billboard Radio Monitor. Archived from the original on May 8, 2006. Retrieved January 12, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  49. ^ Devine, Cathy (2006). The Radio Book 2006-2007. Eleventh Edition. p. 200. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  50. ^ a b c d "Univision rebranding WVIV in Chicago", Radio & Television Business Report. November 30, 2011. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  51. ^ a b Feder, Robert. "FM news war could break out with Newsradio simulcast", Time Out Chicago. June 29, 2011. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  52. ^ Venta, Lance. "La Kalle to Go Away in Chicago Again", Radio Insight. April 12, 2012. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  53. ^ "Changes Come To Chicago's Univision Radio Stations", Chicagoland Radio and Media. March 24, 2014. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  54. ^ a b "Mixed Results for Hispanic Radio as Overall Dollars Tumble in Chicago", Hispanic Market Overview. January 23, 2015. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  55. ^ Feder, Robert. "Univision Chicago Radio sports unbeatable play-by-play lineup", Robert Feder. August 10, 2015. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  56. ^ a b c Venta, Lance. "Univision Sells Chicago FM", Radio Insight. May 25, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  57. ^ a b Jacobson, Adam. "Univision Spins A Suburban Chicago FM", Radio & Television Business Report. May 25, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  58. ^ Application Search Details - BALH-20170524ABF, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  59. ^ Venta, Lance. "Polish CHR Launches in Suburban Chicago", Radio Insight. September 1, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  60. ^ About, WPNA. Retrieved January 12, 2019.

External links[edit]