WSHE-FM

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WSHE-FM
WSHE-2color-chicago.jpg
CityChicago, Illinois
Broadcast areaChicago, Illinois
Branding100.3 WSHE
SloganThe Best Variety of the '80s, '90s, 2k and Today
Frequency100.3 MHz (also on HD Radio)
First air date1948 (as WFMF)[1][2]
FormatAdult contemporary
ERP5,700 watts
HAAT425 meters (1,394 ft)
ClassB
Facility ID10059
Transmitter coordinates41°53′56.00″N 87°37′23.00″W / 41.8988889°N 87.6230556°W / 41.8988889; -87.6230556
Callsign meaningW SHE (female pronoun)
Former callsignsWFMF (1948-1974)[2]
WLOO (1974-1988)[2][3]
WXEZ-FM (1988-1990)[3]
WPNT-FM (1990-1997)[3]
WNND (1997-2004)[3]
WILV (2004-2015)[3]
OwnerHubbard Broadcasting
(Chicago FCC License Sub, LLC)
Sister stationsWDRV, WWDV, WTMX
WebcastListen Live
Websitewshechicago.com

WSHE-FM (100.3 FM, "100.3 WSHE") is a radio station licensed in Chicago, Illinois. The station is currently owned by Hubbard Broadcasting,[4] WSHE-FM is also broadcast on HD radio.[5] It is currently broadcasting an adult contemporary format, but has had a number of owners and utilized a variety of call letters and broadcast a variety of formats since its original incarnation in 1947 as WFMF. Its studios are located at One Prudential Plaza and transmitter facilities atop the John Hancock Center in Downtown Chicago.

History[edit]

Beautiful music era[edit]

The station began broadcasting in 1948 as WFMF, owned by Field Enterprises.[1][2][6] WFMF aired a beautiful music format, and its programming was used for over the air background music in stores.[6][7][8] The station's studios and transmitter were originally located at the Carbide & Carbon Building.[2] In 1957, WFMF was sold to Maurice, Lois, Jerome, and Lucille Rosenfield, for $125,000.[9]

By the mid-1950s, it had the fifth most listeners of any Chicago station during evening hours.[7] In 1955, the FCC attempted to force stations airing "functional music" to confine such programming to subcarriers.[7][10][11][12] WFMF's owners successfully challenged this FCC rule in court, with the station's large listenership among the general public being cited by the United States Court of Appeals in their 1958 ruling.[7][10][11][12] In 1959, WFMF became the first beautiful music FM station to be listed in a Hooper Ratings book.[7]

In 1966, the station was sold to Century Broadcasting for $450,000.[13][2][7] In 1970, its transmitter was moved to the John Hancock Center, while its studios were moved there the following year.[2]

In May 1974, the station's call letters were changed to WLOO, with the "L" often written in lower case to resemble a "1" to reflect its "FM-100" branding.[2][7][14] The station continued to air a beautiful music format;[7][15] mostly instrumental renditions of pop songs along with some soft vocalists. In the late 1970s, it was the second most listened to station in Chicago.[16] During this time, a version of its format known as the "FM 100 Plan" was syndicated by Darrell Peters to over 100 other stations across the country.[17][18][19][20]

Through the 1980s, WLOO continued airing an easy listening format, albeit with more vocals by AC artists and fewer by standards artists.[21]

WXEZ-FM[edit]

In 1988, the call letters changed to WXEZ-FM, standing for "Extra Easy".[3][22][23] The station evolved to a soft AC format, playing more vocals and fewer instrumentals.[23][24][25] The station was simulcast on WXEZ AM 820.[22][25] Its owner, Century Broadcasting, lost an age discrimination suit that was filed by announcers who they had fired and replaced with younger announcers when the station became WXEZ.[23][26]

WPNT-FM[edit]

On November 16, 1990, the station's call letters were changed to WPNT-FM, branded as "The Point", and it began airing a hot AC format, playing hits of the 1980s and current product.[27][28][29][30] The station was initially simulcast on WPNT AM 820, but soon thereafter its AM sister station lost use of its transmitter site and was taken off the air.[27][31]

In 1994, Steve Cochran began hosting morning drive.[32] In 1996, Fred Winston replaced Cochran as morning host.[33][34]

In spring 1997, WPNT was sold to Evergreen Media for $73 million.[35][36] At this time the station was branded "Chicago's 100.3" with the slogan "The Radio Station That Picks You Up & Makes You Feel Good", playing hot AC, including 1980s and 1990s hits, along with currents.[37]

When Evergreen acquired WPNT, Chancellor and Evergreen were in the process of completing their merger.[38][39] The newly formed Chancellor would own too many stations in the Chicago market per FCC ownership limits.[40] As a result WLUP and WPNT were sold to Bonneville International, which already owned hot AC station WTMX.[40]

WNND[edit]

WPNT was musically close to WTMX; so, on October 6, 1997, at 10 a.m., WPNT adopted an adult contemporary format branded "Windy 100".[33][14][41] That month, the station's call letters were changed to WNND to match the new moniker.[3] The first song on "Windy" was "Forever Young" by Rod Stewart.[42][43] On December 10, 2002, the station rebranded as "100.3 WNND" and shifted to an 80s/90s hits format.[44] WNND also carried the nighttime request and dedication show "Love Notes", hosted by John Symons.[45][46]

WILV[edit]

On November 5, 2004, at 7 a.m., the station adopted a rhythmic-leaning AC/rhythmic oldies format as "100.3 Love FM," and its call sign was changed to WILV.[47][48][49][50] In 2006, Tommy Edwards joined "Love FM" as afternoon host, moving to mornings in 2007.[51][52][53] Edwards would later host weekends before leaving for 104.3 WJMK in 2011.[54]

In 2008, the station again became known as "Chicago's 100.3" and it aired an adult contemporary format.[55][56]

On June 7, 2010, at 1 p.m., WILV became "Rewind 100.3", airing a 1980s based classic hits format, along with some music from 1970s and 1990s.[57][58]

Bonneville announced the sale of WILV, as well as 16 other stations, to Hubbard Broadcasting on January 19, 2011.[59] The sale was completed on April 29, 2011.[60]

The station would gradually evolve back to adult contemporary.[56] Cara Carriveau joined WILV as evening host in January 2013, moving to afternoons in July 2014.[61] Carriveau remained with the station until March 2018.[62]

On December 1, 2013, WILV rebranded back to the "Chicago's 100.3" moniker.[56][63]

WSHE-FM[edit]

On March 2, 2015, WILV relaunched under new WSHE-FM call letters retaining the same fulltime air staff.[64] In September 2018, the station's weekday airstaff included Brooke & Jubal (mornings), Lisa Kosty (middays), Jay Styles (afternoons) and Brian Middleton (evenings).[65]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Broadcasting - Telecasting 1950 Yearbook Number, Broadcasting - Telecasting. 1950. p. 1320. Retrieved September 18, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h History Cards for WSHE-FM, fcc.gov. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  4. ^ "WILV Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division.
  5. ^ "HD Radio Station Guide for Chicago". HD Radio. iBiquity.
  6. ^ a b "Field Music Service Via FM Bucks Muzak", Billboard. December 31, 1949. p. 6. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h O'Connor, Richard. (2009). A Brief History of Beautiful Music Radio, Percy Faith Pages. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  8. ^ "FM Units Double in Two Year Period", Broadcasting. February 20, 1961. p. 82. Retrieved February 16, 2019.
  9. ^ "Ownership Changes", Broadcasting - Telecasting. September 30, 1957. p. 105. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  10. ^ a b "Functional Music, Inc. v. Federal Communications Commission, Functional Music, Inc. v. United States of America, Federal Communications Commission, 274 F.2d 543 (D.C. Cir. 1959)", United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Argued June 10, 1958. Decided November 7, 1958. Filed October 12, 1959. Court Listener. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  11. ^ a b "FCC-to-FM Ops: 'You Must Stop Simplex Music'", Billboard. October 13, 1958. pp. 14, 18. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  12. ^ a b "FCC to Appeal Court Functional Music Okay", Billboard. November 24, 1958. p. 13. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  13. ^ "Ownership Changes", Broadcasting. March 14, 1966. p. 95. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  14. ^ a b Cappo, Joe (November 15, 1997). "Old WFMF's New Letters Get a Few Months, Tops". Crain's Chicago Business. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  15. ^ "Stations, everywhere: a listeners' guide to the AM and FM bands", Chicago Tribune Magazine, March 4, 1979. p. 35. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  16. ^ "The Chicago area's most popular radio stations", Chicago Tribune Magazine, March 4, 1979. p. 15. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  17. ^ Sterling, Christopher H.; Keith, Michael C. (September 15, 2009). Sounds of Change: A History of FM Broadcasting in America. University of North Carolina Press. p. 139. Retrieved September 22, 2018 – via Google Books.
  18. ^ Powers, Walter; Hobson, Dan. "Beautiful Music Syndicators Timeline" (PDF). EasyListeningHQ.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 10, 2011. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  19. ^ Carruthers, Michael. "Beautiful Music Programming", Broadcast Programming & Production. January/February 1978. p. 23. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  20. ^ Feder, Robert. "Darrel Peters 1933-2017", Robert Feder. October 19, 2017. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  21. ^ Chicago Radio Guide. Vol. 1, No. 1. May 1985. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  22. ^ a b Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  23. ^ a b c Drell, Adrienne (June 4, 1990). "Fired radio announcers sue WXEZ-FM, charge age bias". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on February 20, 2016. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  24. ^ "WXEZ Moving To Soft AC", Radio & Records. August 18, 1989. pp. 5, 38. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  25. ^ a b "WXEZ FM 100.3", Radio Chicago, Winter 1990. p. 61. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  26. ^ Grady, William. "Court Upholds Bias Ruling", Chicago Tribune. March 25, 1992. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  27. ^ a b Feder, Robert (November 15, 1990). "To make its 'Point,' 'XEZ will disappear". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on May 5, 2016. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  28. ^ "WPNT FM 100.3", Radio Chicago, Winter 1991. p. 59. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  29. ^ "WPNT (100.3 the Point) - Chicago - 1991 - FM Airchecks". fmairchecks.com. 10 July 2012. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  30. ^ "100.3 The Point - 1993 jingles", Chicagoland Radio and Media. September 8, 2014. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  31. ^ "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 8, No. 1. January 7, 1991. p. 1. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  32. ^ Kening, Dan. "Minneapolis Morning Star Jumps Into the Fray in Chicago", Chicago Tribune. January 25, 1994. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  33. ^ a b Feder, Robert. "New 'Windy 100' format blows out Winston & Co.", Chicago Sun-Times. October 6, 1997. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  34. ^ Feder, Robert. "AM-1000 adds Winston as midday personality", Chicago Sun-Times. November 24, 1997. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  35. ^ Feder, Robert (April 10, 1997). "Sale of WGCI, Loop to realign local radio". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on September 11, 2016. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  36. ^ Feder, Robert (June 3, 1997). "New owners at WPNT point to quick turnover". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on September 11, 2016. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  37. ^ "WPNT (Chicago's 100.3) - 6/10/97 - Todd Manley - FM Airchecks". fmairchecks.com. June 11, 2014. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  38. ^ "Chancellor Media Takes Flight; Pilots In Place", Radio & Records. September 12, 1997. pp. 1, 26. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  39. ^ Hofmeister, Sallie (February 19, 1997). "$2.7-Billion Deal Would Create No. 2 Radio Group in U.S." Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  40. ^ a b Jones, Tim. "Evergreen Switching Stations", Chicago Tribune. April 11, 1997. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  41. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14 No. 40. October 8, 1997. p. 1. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  42. ^ "100.3 WPNT becomes "Windy 100" WNND - Format Change Archive". formatchange.com. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  43. ^ "WNND (Windy 100) - Chicago - 10/1/97 (FIRST HOUR) - FM Airchecks". fmairchecks.com. October 1, 2014. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  44. ^ Feder, Robert (December 10, 2002). "New music blown out in 'Windy' realignment". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on March 12, 2018. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  45. ^ "John Symons' 'Love Notes' aircheck - WNND-FM 10/15/04", Chicagoland Radio and Media. October 15, 2014. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  46. ^ "WNND - John Symons Signoff - 11/04/04", Chicagoland Radio and Media. April 13, 2012. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  47. ^ Feder, Robert (November 5, 2004). "There's 'Love' in the air at radio's ardent newcomer". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on May 5, 2016. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  48. ^ "Will Chicago Love "Soft Jammin' Oldies"? First Listen: WILV (Love 100.3) Chicago". Edison Research. November 22, 2004. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  49. ^ "WNND/Chicago Falls in Love", Radio & Records. November 12, 2004. pp. 3, 12. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  50. ^ Devine, Cathy (2005). The M Street Radio Directory. 2005-2006 Edition. p. 191. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  51. ^ "Love Finds Tommy Edwards In Chicago", All Access Music Group. October 20, 2006. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  52. ^ Feder, Robert (October 20, 2006). "'Love FM' embraces Edwards in afternoons". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on November 7, 2006. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  53. ^ Feder, Robert. "Edwards set to move up to mornings on Love FM", Chicago Sun-Times. February 13, 2007. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  54. ^ "WJMK-FM Hires Famed Chicago DJ Tommy Edwards", Chicagoland Radio and Media. March 21, 2011. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  55. ^ Devine, Cathy (2009). The Radio Book. Eighteenth Edition. p. 201. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  56. ^ a b c Venta, Lance. "WILV Rewound No More", Radio Insight. December 1, 2013. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  57. ^ "Chicago Getting Ready To Rewind? - RadioInsight". Radio Insight. 7 June 2010. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  58. ^ Lazare, Lewis (June 8, 2010). "Radio's lost 'Love'". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on March 12, 2018. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  59. ^ "$505M sale: Bonneville sells Chicago, D.C., St. Louis and Cincinnati to Hubbard". Radio-Info.com. January 19, 2011. Archived from the original on January 22, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2011.
  60. ^ "Hubbard deal to purchase Bonneville stations closes". Radio Ink. May 2, 2011. Archived from the original on March 12, 2012. Retrieved May 2, 2011.
  61. ^ "Changes At Chicago's 100.3 - Monzures Out, Carriveau Moves To Afternoons", Chicagoland Radio and Media. July 9, 2014. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  62. ^ Venta, Lance. "Cara Carriveau Resigns From Afternoons At 100.3 WSHE Chicago", Radio Insight. March 2, 2018. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  63. ^ Feder, Robert. "Station breaks from ‘Rewind’ branding", Robert Feder. December 8, 2013. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  64. ^ Venta, Lance (March 2, 2015). "SHE Comes To Chicago's 100.3". Radio Insight. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  65. ^ Staff Bios - 100.3 WSHE FM Chicago, WSHE-FM. Retrieved September 23, 2018.

External links[edit]