WXOB-LP

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WXOB-LP
WXOB-TV Logo.jpg
Richmond, Virginia
BrandingWXOB-LP TV17
SloganYour Neighborhood Station, Featuring Your Neighborhood Churches
ChannelsAnalog: 17 (UHF)
AffiliationsReligious Independent
OwnerKM Broadcasting
FoundedAugust 30, 1990
Call letters' meaningreversal of The BOX (former name of MTV2)
Former callsignsW14BN (1990-1998)
Former affiliationsIndependent (1990-1998)
The Box (1998-2000)
MTV2 (2000-2002)
TBN (January 2004- ?)
Transmitter power131 kW
ClassLow-power

WXOB-LP is a low-power, religious independent television station in Richmond, Virginia, broadcasting locally on channel 17. The station is owned by KM Broadcasting of Annandale, Virginia, which should not be confused with KM Communications Inc..

Digital television[edit]

WXOB does not offer a digital television signal, but still broadcasts on an analog television signal despite the American digital television transition in 2009. The transition process only affected large, far-reaching commercial stations and not small, independent ones like WXOB.[1]

History[edit]

Founded on August 30, 1990, the station was launched as W14BN, presumably an independent television station. In 1998, the call signs were changed to WBOX, the station serving as a repeater affiliate for The Box music channel, which was later replaced by MTV2 in 2000. Originally broadcast on local channel 14, the station switched to channel 17 in 2002, after it was acquired by KM Broadcasting and ended its affiliation with MTV2. Once KM's takeover was complete, the call signs were reversed from WBOX to WXOB. The station began to offer religious shows from around the Richmond area, as well as several surrounding cities. In 2004, the station carried the Trinity Broadcasting Network for a short time.

Programming[edit]

WXOB broadcasts religious shows originating from Richmond, as well as cities in the nearby Tidewater Region such as Virginia Beach and Newport News. The television evangelists featured are exclusively Protestant, with some them preaching the controversial Word of Faith theology. The vast majority of ministers seen on the channel are African-American. The station also offers three national religious programs: Enjoying Everyday Life with white female evangelist Joyce Meyer, Amazing Facts with Seventh-day Adventist Church evangelist Doug Batchelor, and the Shepherd's Chapel with controversial pastor Arnold Murray. In the early weekday mornings, the station airs a children's show called ImagineLand. The station's minuscule secular programming blocks includes programming from PBS affiliate WHRO-TV in Hampton Roads.

Logos[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Are You Ready? Richmond Times-Dispatch,

External links[edit]