Wafa al Bass

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Wafa al Bass (Wafa al-Biss, b. 1984) is a Palestinian Arab resident of Gaza who was permitted to enter Israel for the purpose of being treated at an Israeli hospital in 2005. She wore a suicide bomb vest which she attempted to explode as she crossed into Israel via the Erez Crossing.[1][2]

Al Bass had been given permission to enter Israel to receive hospital treatment for severe burns. Guards at the crossing became suspicious and discovered that under her traditional black robes she had strapped a 22-pound bomb to her leg.[3][4][5]

She was imprisoned for several years and released in the 2011 Gilad Shalit prisoner exchange.

Upon release from prison she immediately attained further notoriety by urging Gazans to “take another Shalit” every year until all convicted Arab terrorists held in Israeli prisons were freed.[6] As schoolchildren gathered at her home in northern Gaza to welcome her home, she told them, "I hope you will walk the same path we took and God willing, we will see some of you as martyrs." [7][8]

Video[edit]

  • NBC News video [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A suicide bombing attack planned to be carried out in Israel". Terrorism-info.org.il. Retrieved 2011-11-09. 
  2. ^ Rosemarie Skaine (2006). Female suicide bombers. McFarland. p. 146. ISBN 978-0-7864-2615-7. Retrieved 9 November 2011. 
  3. ^ "Israel Offers Two More Towns". CBS News. 2009-02-11. Retrieved 2011-11-09. 
  4. ^ "Women Weapons - June 29, 2005 - The New York Sun". Nysun.com. Retrieved 2011-11-09. 
  5. ^ "Attack by female suicide bomber thwarted at Erez crossing". Israel Ministry of foreign affairs. 20 June 2005. 
  6. ^ "Israeli Soldier Swapped for Hundreds of Palestinians". NY Times. October 18, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Would-be bomber tells Gaza kids to be like her - Israel News, Ynetnews". Ynetnews.com. 1995-06-20. Retrieved 2011-11-09. 
  8. ^ "Freed Wafa al-Biss tells Gaza children to follow her example - Region - World - Ahram Online". English.ahram.org.eg. 2011-10-19. Retrieved 2011-11-09.