Waikouaiti (New Zealand electorate)

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Waikouaiti was a parliamentary electorate in the Otago region of New Zealand, from 1866 to 1908.

Population centres[edit]

The electorate is named after the township of Waikouaiti, which is close to the Waikouaiti River.

History[edit]

The Waikouaiti electorate was formed for the 1866 election.[1] William Murison was elected as the first representative, narrowly beating later Premier Julius Vogel;[2] Vogel stood some weeks later in the Gold Fields electorate and was successful there.[3] Murison resigned in 1868.[4] The resulting 1868 by-election was won by Robert Mitchell, who in turn resigned before the end of the term in the following year.[5] He was succeeded by Francis Rich, who won the 1869 by-election and served until the end of the term in 1870, when he retired.[6]

George McLean won the 1871 election and resigned again in the following year.[7] McLean was succeeded by David Monro, who won the 1872 by-election and resigned one year later. Monro had been a member of all previous Parliaments.[8] Monro was succeeded by John Lillie Gillies, who won the 1873 by-election and resigned in 1875.[9] Gillies was succeeded by McLean, who successfully stood for re-election in the 1875 by-election. McLean was confirmed in the general elections of 1875 and 1879 election; he retired at the end of the parliamentary term in 1881.[7]

James Green, who had previously represented Port Chalmers, succeeded McLean in the 1881 election.[10] Green was defeated in the 1884 election by John Channing Buckland.[11] In the 1887 election, Buckland stood in Waihemo and was defeated there.[12]

James Green was re-elected in 1887 in the Waikouaiti electorate and represented it for several terms until he was defeated in the 1896 election by Edmund Allen who stood for the Liberal Party.[13] In the 1902 election, Allen successfully contested the Chalmers electorate.[14]

Thomas Mackenzie was elected in the Waikouaiti electorate in 1902 and would represent it until the electorate's abolition in 1908, when he was elected for Taieri.[15] Mackenzie would later become Prime Minister.[16]

Members of Parliament[edit]

Waikouaiti was represented by ten Members of Parliament:[1]

Key

 Independent    Liberal  

Election Winner
1866 election William Murison
1868 by-election Robert Mitchell
1869 by-election Francis Rich
1871 election George McLean
1872 by-election David Monro
1873 by-election John Gillies
1875 by-election George McLean
1875 election
1879 election
1881 election James Green
1884 election John Buckland
1887 election James Green
1890 election
1893 election
1896 election Edmund Allen
1899 election
1902 election Thomas Mackenzie
1905 election
(Electorate abolished 1908)

Election results[edit]

1899 election[edit]

General election, 1899: Waikouaiti[17][18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Edmund Allen 1,749 55.24
Conservative John White[19] 1,417 44.76
Majority 332 10.49
Turnout 3,166 74.37
Registered electors 4,257

1866 election[edit]

General election, 1866: Waikouaiti[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent William Murison 37 50.68
Independent Julius Vogel 35 47.95
Independent Andrew Thompson 1 1.37
Majority 2 2.74
Turnout 73 45.91
Registered electors 159

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Scholefield 1950, p. 165.
  2. ^ a b "Waikouaiti Election". Otago Witness (744). 3 March 1866. p. 8. Retrieved 8 January 2017. 
  3. ^ Dalziel, Raewyn. "Vogel, Julius". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 8 January 2017. 
  4. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 128.
  5. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 126.
  6. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 135.
  7. ^ a b Scholefield 1950, p. 124.
  8. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 127.
  9. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 108.
  10. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 109.
  11. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 98.
  12. ^ Wilson 1985.
  13. ^ Scholefield 1950, pp. 92, 109.
  14. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 92.
  15. ^ Scholefield 1950, pp. 123, 165.
  16. ^ Brooking, Tom. "Mackenzie, Thomas Noble 1853–1930". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  17. ^ "The General Election, 1899". Wellington: Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives. 19 June 1900. p. 2. Retrieved 12 February 2014. 
  18. ^ "Otago". The Star (6661). 6 December 1899. p. 4. Retrieved 8 March 2014. 
  19. ^ Cyclopedia Company Limited (1905). "Barristers and Solicitors". The Cyclopedia of New Zealand : Otago & Southland Provincial Districts. Christchurch: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 3 February 2017. 

References[edit]

  • Scholefield, Guy (1950) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1949 (3rd ed.). Wellington: Govt. Printer. 
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103.