Waipawa

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Waipawa
Waipawa.jpg
Coordinates: 39°56′S 176°35′E / 39.933°S 176.583°E / -39.933; 176.583Coordinates: 39°56′S 176°35′E / 39.933°S 176.583°E / -39.933; 176.583
CountryNew Zealand
RegionHawke's Bay
Territorial authorityCentral Hawke's Bay District
WardRuataniwha
Population
 (June 2021)[1]
 • Total2,360
Postcode(s)
4210

Waipawa is the second-largest town in Central Hawke's Bay in the east of the North Island of New Zealand. It has a population of 2,360 (June 2021).[1] At the 2013 census, it had a population of 1,965, a change of 2.2 percent from the 2006 census.[2]

The town is located 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) northeast of Waipukurau and 46 km (29 mi) southwest of Hastings, on the northern bank of the Waipawa River, a tributary of the Tukituki River.[3][4] Waipawa was settled in the early 1860s, and the Settler's Museum exhibits many of these historical collections.[5]

It holds the main office of the Central Hawke's Bay District Council, and is New Zealand's oldest inland European settlement.[5]

Frederick Abbot was one of the early settlers[6] and Waipawa was originally called Abbotsford, when the township was being sold in 1859,[7] and there is still a children's home in Waipawa named Abbotsford.[8] However, it was often shown as Abbotsford, Waipawa[9] and Waipawa was more commonly used alone after the opening of the Waipawa railway station and Waipawa Mail in the late 1870s.[10]

A local newspaper, the Waipawa Mail, was published for most of the period from 1878 to 1980. It was one of 45 started by Joseph Ivess. In 1980 it merged to become the CHB Mail,[11] which is now a free weekly paper, published in Waipukurau.[12]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
YearPop.±% p.a.
20061,926—    
20131,971+0.33%
20182,085+1.13%
Source: [13]

Waipawa had a population of 2,085 at the 2018 New Zealand census, an increase of 114 people (5.8%) since the 2013 census, and an increase of 159 people (8.3%) since the 2006 census. There were 843 households. There were 990 males and 1,095 females, giving a sex ratio of 0.9 males per female. The median age was 43.3 years (compared with 37.4 years nationally), with 450 people (21.6%) aged under 15 years, 291 (14.0%) aged 15 to 29, 912 (43.7%) aged 30 to 64, and 429 (20.6%) aged 65 or older.

Ethnicities were 84.0% European/Pākehā, 25.3% Māori, 3.9% Pacific peoples, 1.7% Asian, and 1.4% other ethnicities (totals add to more than 100% since people could identify with multiple ethnicities).

The proportion of people born overseas was 13.8%, compared with 27.1% nationally.

Although some people objected to giving their religion, 54.2% had no religion, 32.5% were Christian, 0.1% were Buddhist and 5.0% had other religions.

Of those at least 15 years old, 216 (13.2%) people had a bachelor or higher degree, and 408 (25.0%) people had no formal qualifications. The median income was $26,400, compared with $31,800 nationally. The employment status of those at least 15 was that 777 (47.5%) people were employed full-time, 261 (16.0%) were part-time, and 45 (2.8%) were unemployed.[13]

Marae[edit]

Waipawa has two marae affiliated with the iwi of Ngāti Kahungunu. The Mataweka Marae and Nohomaiterangi meeting house are affiliated with the hapū of Ngāi Toroiwaho and Ngāti Whatuiāpiti. The Tapairu Marae and Te Rangitahi or Te Whaea o te Katoa meeting house are affiliated with the hapū of Ngāti Mārau o Kahungunu.[14][15]

In October 2020, the Government committed $887,291 from the Provincial Growth Fund to upgrade the two marae and three others, creating 12 jobs.[16]

Education[edit]

Waipawa School is a Year 1-8 co-educational state primary school.[17][18] It is a decile 3 school with a roll of 309 as of March 2022.[19][20]

Waipawa used to have a secondary school, Waipawa District High School. This was merged in 1959 with Waipukurau District High School to make Central Hawke's Bay College based in Waipukurau.[21]

Waipawa has been home to several youth organisations. Namely, the New Zealand Cadet Forces's ATC branch, as well as a Scouts New Zealand branch. However, since 2000, both major youth organisations have gone into recess.

Waipawa railway station in 1905

Waipawa railway station[edit]

From at least 1870[22] Waipawa was served by mail coaches running between Napier and Waipukurau.[23]

On Monday 28 August 1876 the railway was extended from Te Aute to Waipawa,[24][25] later becoming part of the Palmerston North–Gisborne Line. It was part of the Paki Paki to Waipukurau contract, tendered on 15 July 1874 for £19,532 by Charles McKirdy, of Wellington, who built the Rimutaka Incline and several other lines.[26] A local contractor tendered £29,173.[27] There were allegations of mismanagement[28] and disputes about the contracts.[29] For example, the work was started by the international contractor, Brogdens.[30] However, in 1876, the Minister for Public Works, Edward Richardson, attributed delays only to unexpectedly heavy land claims and floods. S Tracey and Allen, of Napier, tendered £7,989 for track for the Paki Paki-Waipawa length in September 1875,[31] but they lost the contract in May 1876, due to slow progress.[32] Waipawa started with 2 trains a day in each direction,[33] increased to 3 in 1883[34] and 4 in 1896.[35] Waipawa had 7 trains a day in 1940.[36]

Waipawa was the terminus for 3 days, until a 4 mi 62.93 ch (7.703 km) extension to Waipukurau[37] opened on 1 September 1876. The contract for laying the track for the 28.58 km (17.76 mi) southerly extension of the line to Takapau was advertised in April 1876.[38] The line to Waipukurau was built by Brogdens for £9,469 7s 9d.[39] Donald Ross built the 60 ft (18 m) bridges over the Waipawa and Tukituki Rivers for £23,410.[40] In 1875 construction of the Waipawa bridge, just south of Waipawa,[41] was delayed by timber supplies.[42] The bridge was strengthened in 1911[43] and rebuilt in 1939.[44]

When the station opened, McLeod's contract for a 5th class stationmaster's house had been completed in October 1875 and Richard Phillips' contract for the station buildings by 22 March 1876. Following the opening Richard Phillips extended the station over the next couple of years. By 1896 Waipawa had a 4th class station, platform (12 ft (3.7 m) wide in 1912), cart approach to platform, 40 ft (12 m) x 30 ft (9.1 m) goods shed, loading bank, cattle yards, stationmaster's house, urinals and a passing loop for 42 wagons, extended to 49 by 1911 and 80 in 1940. Fires damaged the station in 1896 and 1899. In 1905 Richard Phillips rebuilt the station and goods shed. Railway houses were built in 1905 and 1928. A verandah was added in 1908[24] and can be seen in a 1913 photo.[45] In 1912 an automatic tablet exchanger was added, by which time the lean-to station had luggage and parcels rooms, an office, vestibule, ladies waiting room and a 1½ ton crane. By 1914 the goods shed has been doubled in length. Electricity was connected in 1928.[46] In the annual returns of traffic, Waipawa was one of the medium sized stations on the line. For example, in 1925 it sold 15,446 tickets and handled 74,062 pigs and sheep.[47]

On 6 December 1981 the station closed to passengers, it was an unattended station from 20 November 1983, closed to all but parcels on 18 August 1984 and closed completely on 2 November 1984. By 1987 only a platform and goods shed remained.[24] The platform, goods shed and a single track still remain.[48]

  Former adjoining stations  
Waipukurau
Line open, station closed
7.52 km (4.67 mi)
  Palmerston North–Gisborne Line   Ōtāne
Line open, station closed
5.81 km (3.61 mi)[49]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Subnational population estimates (RC, SA2), by age and sex, at 30 June 1996-2021 (2021 boundaries)". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 22 October 2021. (regional councils); "Subnational population estimates (TA, SA2), by age and sex, at 30 June 1996-2021 (2021 boundaries)". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 22 October 2021. (territorial authorities); "Subnational population estimates (urban rural), by age and sex, at 30 June 1996-2021 (2021 boundaries)". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 22 October 2021. (urban areas)
  2. ^ "Statistics New Zealand: 2013 Census About a place: Waipawa".
  3. ^ Peter Dowling, ed. (2004). Reed New Zealand Atlas. Reed Books. map 42. ISBN 0-7900-0952-8.
  4. ^ Roger Smith, GeographX (2005). The Geographic Atlas of New Zealand. Robbie Burton. map 108. ISBN 1-877333-20-4.
  5. ^ a b "Waipawa Travel Guide". Jasons Travel Media.
  6. ^ "HAWKE'S BAY HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 28 August 1858. Retrieved 6 September 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. ^ "HAWKE'S BAY HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 3 December 1859. Retrieved 6 September 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ "Discover Waipawa: Central Hawkes Bay - Unwind Country". Archived from the original on 14 May 2010.
  9. ^ "HAWKE'S BAY HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 24 October 1857. Retrieved 6 September 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ "Search". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 6 September 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ "Waipawa Mail". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. ^ "NZME Community News". chbmail.communitynews.co.nz. Retrieved 20 August 2021.
  13. ^ a b "Statistical area 1 dataset for 2018 Census". Statistics New Zealand. March 2020. Waipawa (215700). 2018 Census place summary: Waipawa
  14. ^ "Te Kāhui Māngai directory". tkm.govt.nz. Te Puni Kōkiri.
  15. ^ "Māori Maps". maorimaps.com. Te Potiki National Trust.
  16. ^ "Marae Announcements" (Excel). growregions.govt.nz. Provincial Growth Fund. 9 October 2020.
  17. ^ "Official School Website". waipawa.school.nz.
  18. ^ "Ministry of Education School Profile". educationcounts.govt.nz. Ministry of Education.
  19. ^ "New Zealand Schools Directory". New Zealand Ministry of Education. Retrieved 23 April 2022.
  20. ^ "Education Review Office Report". ero.govt.nz. Education Review Office.
  21. ^ "History". Central Hawke's Bay College. Retrieved 5 June 2019.
  22. ^ "INLAND JOTTINGS BY THE WAY. HAWKE'S BAY HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 8 April 1870. Retrieved 21 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  23. ^ "HAWKE'S BAY TIMES". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 23 January 1874. Retrieved 20 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  24. ^ a b c "Station Archive". NZR Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 10 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  25. ^ "EVENING POST". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 25 August 1876. Retrieved 20 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  26. ^ "Census | 2018 | SA1 Dataset". datafinder.stats.govt.nz. Retrieved 31 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  27. ^ "WAIPAWA MAIL". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 9 May 1884. Retrieved 31 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  28. ^ "WAIPAWA MAIL". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 26 October 1883. Retrieved 31 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  29. ^ "Otane's Day. WAIPAWA MAIL". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 20 May 1929. Retrieved 31 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  30. ^ "HAWKE'S BAY TIMES". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 1 May 1874. Retrieved 20 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  31. ^ "Otane war memorial". nzhistory.govt.nz. Retrieved 31 July 2021.
  32. ^ "NAPIER. EVENING POST". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 26 May 1876. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  33. ^ "HAWKE'S BAY HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 9 March 1877. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  34. ^ "DAILY TELEGRAPH". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 9 January 1883. Retrieved 17 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  35. ^ "RAILWAY TIME-TABLE. HASTINGS STANDARD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 28 April 1896. Retrieved 16 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  36. ^ "WAIPAWA. RAILWAY TIME-TABLE. WAIPAWA MAIL". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 7 October 1940. Retrieved 22 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  37. ^ "WELLINGTON INDEPENDENT". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 7 February 1874. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  38. ^ "WAIRARAPA STANDARD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 15 April 1876. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  39. ^ "WELLINGTON INDEPENDENT". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 9 January 1874. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  40. ^ "LATEST SOUTHERN NEWS. AUCKLAND STAR". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 21 March 1874. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  41. ^ "Waipawa, Wellington". NZ Topo Map. Retrieved 18 August 2021.
  42. ^ "LATEST SOUTHERN TELEGRAMS. AUCKLAND STAR". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 2 June 1875. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  43. ^ "STRENGTHENING THE WAIPAWA BRIDGE TO TAKE HEAVIER TRAFFIC. Auckland Weekly News". www.aucklandcity.govt.nz. 2 November 1911. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  44. ^ "RECORD REVENUE. GISBORNE HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 27 December 1939. Retrieved 19 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  45. ^ "Railway Station Waipawa". www.aucklandcity.govt.nz. 1913. Retrieved 18 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  46. ^ "LOCAL & GENERAL. WAIPAWA MAIL". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 21 May 1928. Retrieved 6 September 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  47. ^ "RAILWAYS STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER OF RAILWAYS, HON. J. G. COATES. APPENDIX TO THE JOURNALS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 1925". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 22 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  48. ^ "Waipawa". Google Maps. Retrieved 19 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  49. ^ Yonge, John Roger; Company, Quail Map (1993). New Zealand Railway and Tramway Atlas. Quail Map Company. ISBN 9780900609923.