Wajik

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Wajik
YosriWajik.jpg
Wajik
Alternative namesWajid
TypeKue
CourseSnack
Place of originJava, Indonesia[1]
Region or stateMaritime Southeast Asia
Created byJavanese people
Serving temperatureRoom temperature
Main ingredientsGlutinous rice, palm sugar, coconut milk

Wajik or wajid is a diamond-shaped kue or traditional snack made with steamed glutinous (sticky) rice and further cooked in palm sugar, coconut milk, and pandan leaves.[1] The sweet sticky rice cake is commonly found in Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei. It is called wajid in Brunei[2] and Sabah.

In Indonesian language the term wajik is used to describe the shape of rhombus or diamond-shape, consequently in a card game, the carreaux (tiles or diamonds) is translated as a wajik.

Ingredients and cooking method[edit]

Wajik is made with steamed glutinous (sticky) rice and further cooked in palm sugar, coconut milk, and pandan leaves. The cooked rice is then spread and flatted in a baking tray. Once it cools to room temperature, the sticky rice cake is cut into small pieces in the shape of a diamond or rhombus.[1]

Cultural significance[edit]

Wajik has a cultural significance within Javanese culture, as it often form an essential part in Javanese selamatan ceremony. During annual Sekaten festival, there is a Tumplak wajik ceremony. While in Pekalongan Regency there is a regional wajik specialty called Wajik Klethik.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Anita (6 January 2014). "Wajik – Sticky Rice in Palm Sugar and Pandan Leaves". Daily Cooking Quest. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  2. ^ Tamara Thiessen (2012). Borneo: Sabah - Brunei - Sarawak. Bradt Travel Guides. pp. 146–. ISBN 978-1-84162-390-0. Retrieved 19 August 2013.

External links[edit]