Walker County, Texas

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Walker County
The Walker County Courthouse in 2014
The Walker County Courthouse in 2014
Map of Texas highlighting Walker County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 30°44′N 95°34′W / 30.74°N 95.57°W / 30.74; -95.57
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1846
Named forRobert J. Walker, Renamed for Samuel H. Walker
SeatHuntsville
Largest cityHuntsville
Area
 • Total802 sq mi (2,080 km2)
 • Land784 sq mi (2,030 km2)
 • Water17 sq mi (40 km2)  2.2%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total76,400
 • Density95/sq mi (37/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district8th
Websitewww.co.walker.tx.us

Walker County is a county located in the east central section of the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2020 census, its population was 76,400.[1] Its county seat is Huntsville.[2] Initially, Walker County was named for Robert J. Walker, a legislator from Mississippi who introduced into the United States Congress the resolution to annex Texas. Walker later supported the U.S. during its Civil War and earned some enmity for it. In order to keep the county's name, the state renamed it for Samuel H. Walker (no relation), a Texas Ranger and soldier in the United States Army.

Walker County comprises the Huntsville Micropolitan Statistical Area which is part of the HoustonThe Woodlands Combined Statistical Area.

Americans James Mitchell (1795–1870) and his wife, the former Calpernia Franklin (1805–1865), immigrated to the future Walker County in 1833 and were awarded a Mexican land grant. Mitchell, who became one of the first county commissioners, established the Mitchell House and Inn on the Old San Antonio Road, also known as El Camino Real. During the 1840s, the house was a stop for weary and hungry stagecoach travelers.[3]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 802 square miles (2,080 km2), of which 784 square miles (2,030 km2) is land and 17 square miles (44 km2) (2.2%) is water.[4]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18503,964
18608,191106.6%
18709,76619.2%
188012,02423.1%
189012,8747.1%
190015,81322.8%
191016,0611.6%
192018,55615.5%
193018,528−0.2%
194019,8687.2%
195020,1631.5%
196021,4756.5%
197027,68028.9%
198041,78951.0%
199050,91721.8%
200061,75821.3%
201067,8619.9%
202076,40012.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1850–2010[6] 2010–2020[7]

2020 census[edit]

Walker County, Texas - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[8] Pop 2020[7] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 39,671 39,823 58.46% 52.12%
Black or African American alone (NH) 15,098 16,382 22.25% 21.44%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 186 251 0.27% 0.33%
Asian alone (NH) 617 1,126 0.91% 1.47%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 19 39 0.03% 0.05%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 72 318 0.11% 0.42%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 809 1,883 1.19% 2.46%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 11,389 16,578 16.78% 21.70%
Total 67,861 76,400 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2000 Census[edit]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 61,758 people, 18,303 households, and 11,384 families residing in the county. The population density was 78 people per square mile (30/km2). There were 21,099 housing units at an average density of 27 per square mile (10/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 69.12% white, 23.88% black or African American, 0.35% Native American, 0.77% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 4.42% from other races, and 1.41% from two or more races. 14.11% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 18,303 households, out of which 28.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.80% were married couples living together, 11.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.80% were non-families. 27.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 18.00% under the age of 18, 23.00% from 18 to 24, 31.10% from 25 to 44, 18.90% from 45 to 64, and 8.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 151.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 161.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,468, and the median income for a family was $42,589. Males had a median income of $27,634 versus $22,579 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,508. About 10.60% of families and 18.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.10% of those under age 18 and 13.40% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Sam Houston State University is located in Huntsville.

School districts serving portions of the county include:[10]

The Gulf Coast Trades Center, a charter school, is in an unincorporated area of the county.[10][11]

The Huntsville and New Waverly ISDs are assigned to Lone Star College. Areas of Walker County in Trinity ISD are assigned to Angelina College. The portion of Richards ISD in Walker County is zoned to Blinn College.[12]

Government and infrastructure[edit]

Ellis Unit, a prison in unincorporated Walker County

The headquarters of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ), the Texas agency that operates adult state correctional facilities, are in Huntsville.[13][14]

Walker County has the highest number of state prisons and jails of all of the counties in Texas.[15] Several TDCJ prisons for men, including the Byrd Unit,[16] the Goree Unit,[17] the Huntsville Unit,[18] and the Wynne Unit, are in the Huntsville city limits.[19] The Holliday Unit, a transfer unit, is in Huntsville.[20] In addition the Ellis Unit and the Estelle Unit are in unincorporated areas of Walker County.[21][22] The Huntsville Unit houses the State of Texas execution chamber.[23]

Politics[edit]

United States presidential election results for Walker County, Texas[24]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 15,375 65.12% 7,884 33.39% 353 1.50%
2016 12,884 65.08% 6,091 30.77% 821 4.15%
2012 12,140 64.97% 6,252 33.46% 293 1.57%
2008 11,623 60.71% 7,334 38.31% 189 0.99%
2004 11,710 65.71% 5,977 33.54% 135 0.76%
2000 9,076 63.14% 4,943 34.39% 355 2.47%
1996 7,177 49.27% 6,088 41.79% 1,302 8.94%
1992 6,662 41.84% 5,619 35.29% 3,643 22.88%
1988 8,473 58.88% 5,826 40.48% 92 0.64%
1984 8,809 67.24% 4,263 32.54% 28 0.21%
1980 5,657 51.87% 4,869 44.65% 380 3.48%
1976 4,974 48.90% 5,105 50.19% 92 0.90%
1972 5,082 63.20% 2,940 36.56% 19 0.24%
1968 1,946 33.62% 2,391 41.30% 1,452 25.08%
1964 1,557 35.10% 2,877 64.86% 2 0.05%
1960 1,750 48.57% 1,832 50.85% 21 0.58%
1956 1,991 59.86% 1,287 38.70% 48 1.44%
1952 1,897 47.71% 2,078 52.26% 1 0.03%
1948 570 22.23% 1,439 56.12% 555 21.65%
1944 145 7.12% 1,638 80.41% 254 12.47%
1940 218 9.18% 2,158 90.82% 0 0.00%
1936 69 3.86% 1,715 96.02% 2 0.11%
1932 83 4.36% 1,811 95.17% 9 0.47%
1928 488 39.51% 747 60.49% 0 0.00%
1924 201 10.07% 1,792 89.78% 3 0.15%
1920 404 23.45% 788 45.73% 531 30.82%
1916 315 28.56% 763 69.17% 25 2.27%
1912 323 30.88% 631 60.33% 92 8.80%


Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated community[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Walker County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Texas Historical Marker east of Caldwell
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  5. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  6. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  7. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Walker County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  8. ^ "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Walker County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  10. ^ a b "Education Service Center, Region VI Archived November 17, 2011, at the Wayback Machine." (Map) Educational Service Center 6. Retrieved December 8, 2011.
  11. ^ "We can be reached at: Archived December 3, 2011, at the Wayback Machine" Gulf Coast Trades Center. Retrieved December 8, 2011. "Gulf Coast Trades Center / Raven School 143 Forest Service Rd. 233 New Waverly, TX 77358"
  12. ^ Texas Education Code, Sec. 130.165. ANGELINA COUNTY JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICT SERVICE AREA. Sec. 130.168. BLINN JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICT SERVICE AREA. Sec. 130.191. LONE STAR COLLEGE SYSTEM DISTRICT SERVICE AREA..
  13. ^ "Huntsville Prison Blues." National Public Radio. September 10, 2001. Retrieved December 2, 2009.
  14. ^ "LIVINGSTON NAMED EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF STATE’S CRIMINAL JUSTICE AGENCY Archived January 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. July 28, 2005. Retrieved December 2, 2009.
  15. ^ Horswell, Cindy. "For hard-hit economy of Liberty County, crime officially pays." Houston Chronicle. 29 June 1995, A30, Retrieved July 23, 2010.
  16. ^ "Byrd Unit Archived July 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved May 10, 2010.
  17. ^ "Goree Unit Archived July 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved May 10, 2010.
  18. ^ "Huntsville Unit Archived March 30, 2008, at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved May 10, 2010.
  19. ^ "Wynne Unit Archived July 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved May 10, 2010.
  20. ^ "Holliday Unit Archived July 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved July 13, 2010.
  21. ^ "Ellis Unit Archived July 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved May 10, 2010.
  22. ^ "Estelle Unit Archived January 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved May 10, 2010.
  23. ^ "Death Tow Facts Archived November 5, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved May 7, 2010.
  24. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  25. ^ "Marilyn McAdams Sibley". Huntsville Item online. Retrieved September 23, 2010.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 30°44′N 95°34′W / 30.74°N 95.57°W / 30.74; -95.57