Walnut Cove, North Carolina

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Walnut Cove, North Carolina
Town
Nickname(s): The Cove
Location of Walnut Cove, North Carolina
Location of Walnut Cove, North Carolina
Coordinates: 36°17′46″N 80°8′28″W / 36.29611°N 80.14111°W / 36.29611; -80.14111Coordinates: 36°17′46″N 80°8′28″W / 36.29611°N 80.14111°W / 36.29611; -80.14111
Country United States
State North Carolina
County Stokes
Area
 • Total 2.4 sq mi (6.2 km2)
 • Land 2.4 sq mi (6.2 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 676 ft (206 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 1,425
 • Density 593.7/sq mi (229.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 27052
Area code(s) 336
FIPS code 37-70780[1]
GNIS feature ID 0996735[2]
Website www.townofwalnutcove.org

Walnut Cove is a town in Stokes County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 1,425 at the 2010 census.

It is the home of the Walnut Cove Springfest which draws many visitors to the area. Festival-organizers marked 1889, the town’s incorporation date, but the town’s roots date to the mid-18th century when it was known as Town Fork. Town Fork settlers formed a bond with Moravians in Bethania and Bethabara. Eventually, William Lash, a Moravian settler at Bethania, bought land along the Town Fork Creek, which later developed into a large plantation named Walnut Cove. The Town was a railroad center in its former years, and today remnants of the old Train Depot still stand on Depot Street.

It is also home to historic Covington House (built in 1821), Fulp-Marshall Home (built in 1836), Culler Roller Mill now known as Monitor Roller Mill (built in 1900).

Walnut Cove is also home to South Stokes High School, whose team mascot name honors the Native American Indian Saura tribe. Belews Lake and Hanging Rock State Park are located nearby.

History[edit]

The Christ Episcopal Church and Walnut Cove Colored School are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[3]

Geography[edit]

Walnut Cove is located at 36°17′46″N 80°8′28″W / 36.29611°N 80.14111°W / 36.29611; -80.14111 (36.296225, -80.141150).[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.4 square miles (6.2 km²), all of it land.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 320
1900 336 5.0%
1910 480 42.9%
1920 651 35.6%
1930 1,081 66.1%
1940 1,084 0.3%
1950 1,132 4.4%
1960 1,288 13.8%
1970 1,213 −5.8%
1980 1,147 −5.4%
1990 1,088 −5.1%
2000 1,465 34.7%
2010 1,425 −2.7%
Est. 2015 1,402 [5] −1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 1,465 people, 585 households, and 374 families residing in the town. The population density was 608.5 people per square mile (234.7/km²). There were 636 housing units at an average density of 264.2 per square mile (101.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 79.39% White, 19.11% African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.34% from other races, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.96% of the population.

There were 585 households out of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.2% were married couples living together, 15.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.9% were non-families. 32.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.83.

In the town, the population was spread out with 19.5% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 22.8% from 45 to 64, and 26.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 80.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 73.1 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $31,944, and the median income for a family was $41,250. Males had a median income of $31,953 versus $24,871 for females. The per capita income for the town was $16,117. About 8.3% of families and 12.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.0% of those under age 18 and 17.8% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  6. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 

External links[edit]