Walpack Township, New Jersey

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Walpack Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Walpack
The downtown of Wallpack Center, New Jersey facing towards the east, away from National Park Service Route 615.
The downtown of Wallpack Center, New Jersey facing towards the east, away from National Park Service Route 615.
Motto(s): Oldest Municipality in Sussex County
Map of Walpack Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Walpack Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Walpack Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Walpack Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°07′07″N 74°53′39″W / 41.118632°N 74.89404°W / 41.118632; -74.89404Coordinates: 41°07′07″N 74°53′39″W / 41.118632°N 74.89404°W / 41.118632; -74.89404[1][2]
Country  United States
state  New Jersey
County Sussex
Earliest mention October 26, 1731
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Body Township Committee
 • Mayor Victor J. Maglio (R, term ends December 31, 2017)[3][4]
 • Municipal clerk Kelly Maglio[3]
Area[1]
 • Total 24.702 sq mi (63.979 km2)
 • Land 24.050 sq mi (62.289 km2)
 • Water 0.652 sq mi (1.689 km2)  2.64%
Area rank 109th of 566 in state
10th of 24 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 436 ft (133 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 16
 • Estimate (2016)[10] 11
 • Rank 564th of 566 in state
24th of 24 in county[11]
 • Density 0.7/sq mi (0.3/km2)
 • Density rank 566th of 566 in state
24th of 24 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07881 - Walpack Center[12]
Area code(s) 908[13]
FIPS code 3403776640[1][14][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882259[1][16]
Website www.twp.walpack.nj.us

Walpack Township is a township in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a population of 16,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 25 (-61.0%) from the 41 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 26 (-38.8%) from the 67 counted in the 1990 Census.[17] Walpack Township was one of only four municipalities in New Jersey with a double-digit population as of the 2010 Census, and it placed third behind Tavistock (population 5) and Pine Valley (population 12), both in Camden County.[18]

The current Walpack Township is named from a corruption of the Lenape Native American content word "wahlpeck," which means "turn-hole," or an eddy or whirlpool, a compound of two Native American words, "woa-lac" (a hole), and "tuppeck" (a pool),[19] though other sources attribute the name to mean "very deep water"[20] or "sudden bend of a stream around the base of a rock".[21]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Walpack Township as its 18th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[22]

History[edit]

Walpack Township dates back to October 26, 1731, when it was first mentioned as Walpake in Hunterdon County. The area covered by the present-day township was set off to Morris County upon that county's creation in 1739, and became part of the newly formed Sussex County in 1753. As of April 15, 1754, Walpack's boundaries were defined as a "precinct". Walpack was formally incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken to form Montague Township (March 26, 1759), Sandyston Township (February 26, 1762) and the now-defunct Pahaquarry Township in Warren County (December 27, 1824). Territory was gained from Stillwater Township in 1935.[23]

The Andrew Snable House was built in 1801 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 23, 1979.[24]

Judge Joseph Stamler of New Jersey Superior Court rejected a proposal for a six-day rock festival to be held in the summer of 1970 on a 400-acre (160 ha) site in the township, leading to the passage of standards for similar events that requires planning for traffic and safety between the organizers and local authorities, and sets limits on duration. Stamler stated that any positive benefits from such an event must be weighed against the "health, safety and welfare of the young, and the potential harm to the public".[25][26]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 24.702 square miles (63.979 km2), including 24.050 square miles (62.289 km2) of land and 0.652 square miles (1.689 km2) of water (2.64%).[1][2] The township is located in the Minisink Valley that extends from the Delaware Water Gap north to Port Jervis, New York.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Dry Pond, Flat Brook, Flatbrookville, Haneys Mill, Harding Lake, Long Pond and Walpack Center.[27]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810591
182082239.1%
1830660*−19.7%
184072810.3%
18507837.6%
18608518.7%
1870647−24.0%
1880575−11.1%
1890436−24.2%
1900371−14.9%
1910286−22.9%
1920258−9.8%
1930178−31.0%
1940207*16.3%
1950204−1.4%
196024821.6%
197038454.8%
1980150−60.9%
199067−55.3%
200041−38.8%
201016−61.0%
Est. 201611[10][28]−31.2%
Population sources:
1810-1920[29] 1840[30] 1850-1870[31]
1850[32] 1870[33] 1880-1890[34]
1890-1910[35] 1910-1930[36]
1930-1990[37] 2000[38][39] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Territorial change in previous decade.[23]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 16 people, 8 households, and 4 families residing in the township. The population density was 0.7 per square mile (0.27/km2). There were 15 housing units at an average density of 0.6 per square mile (0.23/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.75% (15) White, 0.00% (0) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.00% (0) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.00% (0) from other races, and 6.25% (1) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.00% (0) of the population.[7]

There were 8 households out of which 12.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.5% were married couples living together, 0.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.0% were non-families. 50.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 25.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.00 and the average family size was 3.00.[7]

In the township, the population was spread out with 12.5% under the age of 18, 12.5% from 18 to 24, 18.8% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, and 25.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 56.5 years. For every 100 females there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 100.0 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $108,333 (with a margin of error of +/- $155,555) and the median family income was $127,500 (+/- $88,897). Males had a median income of $ (+/- $) versus $57,813 (+/- $26,023) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,663 (+/- $14,435). About 0.0% of families and 0.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[40]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 41 people, 20 households, and 12 families residing in the township. The population density was 1.7 people per square mile (0.7/km²). There were 34 housing units at an average density of 1.4 per square mile (0.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 100.00% White.[38][39]

There were 20 households out of which 20.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.0% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.0% were non-families. 40.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.05 and the average family size was 2.75.[38][39]

In the township the population was spread out with 19.5% under the age of 18, 2.4% from 18 to 24, 19.5% from 25 to 44, 31.7% from 45 to 64, and 26.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.3 males.[38][39]

The median income for a household in the township was $22,250, and the median income for a family was $22,250. Males had a median income of $46,250 versus $0 for females. The per capita income for the township was $17,624. None of the population and none of the families were below the poverty line.[38][39]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Walpack Township is governed under the Township form of government. The governing body is a three-member Township Committee, whose members are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[5][41] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2016, members of the Walpack Township Committee are Mayor Victor J. Maglio (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2017; term as mayor ends 2016), Deputy Mayor James Heigis (R, term on committee ends 2018; term as deputy mayor ends 2016) and Janina Wycalek (D, 2016).[3][42][43][44][45]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Walpack Township is located in the 5th Congressional District[46] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[8][47][48]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[50] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, 2019).[51][52]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Parker Space (R, Wantage Township) and Harold J. Wirths (R, Hardyston Township).[53][54] The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).[56]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[57] As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016),[58] Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015),[59] Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[60] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016)[61] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[62][57] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[63] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016),[64] Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016)[65] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[66][63] The County Administrator is John Eskilson.[67][68]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 22 registered voters in Walpack Township, of which 1 (4.5% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 17 (77.3% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 2 (9.1% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[69] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 137.5% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 157.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[69][70]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 10 votes (83.3% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2 votes (16.7% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with no votes (0.0% vs. 2.1%), among the 12 ballots cast by the township's 18 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.7% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[71] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 14 votes (70.0% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 3 votes (15.0% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 2 votes (10.0% vs. 1.5%), among the 20 ballots cast by the township's 28 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.4% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[72] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 22 votes (78.6% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 6 votes (21.4% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with no votes (0.0% vs. 1.3%), among the 28 ballots cast by the township's 35 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.0% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[73]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 77.8% of the vote (7 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 22.2% (2 votes), and other candidates receiving no votes, among the 9 ballots cast by the township's 19 registered voters, for a turnout of 47.4%.[74][75] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 11 votes (91.7% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with one vote (8.3% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with no votes (0.0% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with no votes (0.0% vs. 1.3%), among the 12 ballots cast by the township's 23 registered voters, yielding a 52.2% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[76]

Education[edit]

Students in kindergarten through sixth grade attend the schools of the Sandyston-Walpack Consolidated School District, together with students from Sandyston Township.[77] The school is located in the Layton section of Sandyston Township. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its one school had an enrollment of 275 students and 16.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 16.5:1.[78]

Students from Walpack and Sandyston Townships in seventh through twelfth grade for public school attend Kittatinny Regional High School located in Hampton Township, which also serves students who reside in Fredon Township and Stillwater Township.[79] The high school is located on a 96-acre (39 ha) campus in Hampton Township, about seven minutes outside of the county seat of Newton. Kittatinny Regional High School was recognized as a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence in 1997-98.[80] As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,079 students and 97.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.1:1.[81]

Transportation[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 20.01 miles (32.20 km) of roadways, all of which were maintained by the municipality.[82]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Walpack Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Directory, Walpack Township. Accessed August 2, 2016.
  4. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Walpack, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Walpack township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 26, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Walpack township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 26, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
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  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Walpack Center, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 26, 2013.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Walpack, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 29, 2014.
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  22. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  23. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 232. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  24. ^ National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form for Andrew Snable House, National Park Service. Accessed October 20, 2015.
  25. ^ "Stamler Sums Up Career", The New York Times, April 29, 1973. Accessed January 24, 2018. "In the summer of 1970, Judge Stamler issued a permanent injunction that prevented a group of promoters from holding a rock festival in rural Sussex County. 'The question of health, safety and welfare of the young, and the potential harm to the public, far outweighs any good which might be derived,' he ruled."
  26. ^ "Proposed rock fete hits stone wall", Pocono Record, July 14, 1970. Accessed January 24, 2018. "Walpack Township officials Monday won the first round in a court proceeding initiated at 9:30 ... Stamler said that there is a 'probability' the festival would jeopardize the public health and welfare of Walpack Township and Sussex County residents."
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  32. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 26, 2013.
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  62. ^ Gail Phoebus, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  63. ^ a b Miller, Jennifer Jean. "George Graham Chosen as Freeholder at Sussex County Republican Convention", TheAlternativePress.com, April 13, 2013. Accessed April 25, 2013. "Graham will fill the freeholder seat that New Jersey Assemblyman Parker Space left to take his new position. Space recently took the seat, which formerly belonged to Gary Chiusano, who in turn, was appointed to the spot of Sussex County Surrogate, following the retirement of Surrogate Nancy Fitzgibbons."
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  77. ^ About Us, Sandyston-Walpack Consolidated School District. Accessed February 25, 2013. "The elementary students who live in the townships of Sandyston and Walpack attend here. The students of middle and high school age attend Kittatinny Regional High School located in Hampton Township."
  78. ^ District information for Sandyston-Walpack Consolidated School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
  79. ^ Kittatiny Regional School District 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 3, 2017. "Located in beautiful, rural Sussex County in northwest New Jersey, Kittatinny Regional School District serves the five municipalities of Fredon Township, Hampton Township, Sandyston Township, Stillwater Township and the Township of Walpack. The District is comprised hide-y [sic] 125 square miles and has a school population of approximately 1020 students."
  80. ^ Blue Ribbon Schools Program: Schools Recognized 1982-1983 through 1999-2002 (PDF), United States Department of Education. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  81. ^ School data for Kittatinny High School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 12, 2016.
  82. ^ Sussex County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  83. ^ Fox, Margalit. "Frank Chapot, Olympic Show Jumper and Mainstay of the Sport, Dies at 84", The New York Times, June 25, 2016. Accessed June 26, 2016. "The son of Frank Joseph Chapot and the former Dorothy Davis, Frank Davis Chapot was born on Feb. 24, 1932, in Camden, N.J. He was reared on his parents' horse farm in Walpack, N.J."

External links[edit]