Walter B. Slocombe

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Walter B. Slocombe
Portrait of Walter B. Slocombe, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy.jpg
Under Secretary of Defense for Policy
In office
September 15, 1994 – January 19, 2001
PresidentBill Clinton
Preceded byFrank G. Wisner
Succeeded byDouglas Feith
Personal details
Born
Walter Becker Brakeman[1]

(1941-09-23) September 23, 1941 (age 80)
Albuquerque, New Mexico
NationalityAmerican
Spouse(s)Ellen Seidman[1]
Children3
Alma materHarvard Law School
University of Oxford
Princeton University
OccupationLawyer

Walter Becker Slocombe (born September 23, 1941) is a former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy (1994–2001)[2] and was the Senior Advisor for Security and Defense to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad (2003).

A lawyer and career federal official, Slocombe joined the staff of the National Security Council in 1969. Prior to that, he worked as a law clerk for Supreme Court Justice Abe Fortas.[3] Slocombe currently sits on the Board of Directors at the Atlantic Council,[4] is a four-time recipient of an award for Distinguished Public Service and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He currently practices law with the Washington firm of Caplin & Drysdale.

Education[edit]

Slocombe was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico and raised in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he graduated from Tappan Junior High School in 1955 and the University High School in 1959. He earned a B.A. degree from the School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University in 1963,[1][5] where he received the Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize, the highest general distinction conferred on an undergraduate. Slocombe was also a Rhodes Scholar, studying Soviet politics at Balliol College, Oxford, from 1963 to 1965. He graduated summa cum laude with a LL.B. degree from Harvard Law School in 1968[1][5] and was admitted to the bar in 1970.

U.S. Government service[edit]

Personal[edit]

Slocombe is married to Ellen (Shapiro) Seidman. He has two daughters and one son. His wife was employed by the Clinton White House.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Nominations Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Second Session, 103d Congress: Hearings Before the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate". Vol. 103, no. 873. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. 1994. pp. 961–964. ISBN 978-0-16-046386-0.
  2. ^ Glanz, James (2005-11-18). "Issuing Contracts, Ex-Convict Took Bribes in Iraq, U.S. Says". New York Times. Retrieved 2007-09-28.
  3. ^ Laura Kalman (1990). Abe Fortas. Yale University Press. Retrieved 2008-10-20.
  4. ^ "Board of Directors". Atlantic Council. Retrieved 2020-02-11.
  5. ^ a b "Nominations Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, First Session, 103d Congress: Hearings Before the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate". Vol. 103, no. 414. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. 1994. pp. 802–803. ISBN 978-0-16-043611-6.

External links[edit]