Walter Chalmers Smith

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Walter Chalmers Smith

Walter Chalmers Smith (5 December 1824 – 19 September 1908), was a hymnist, poet and minister of the Free Church of Scotland, chiefly remembered for his hymn "Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise".

Life[edit]

He was born in Aberdeen and attended Marischal College at the University of Aberdeen and New College, Edinburgh.[1] He received the degrees of D.D. and LL.D. He was mentioned in Lord Adam Gifford's will.

Service[edit]

He was ordained pastor of the Chadwell Street Scottish Church, Pentonville, Islington, London, on Christmas Day, 1850. He later served at:

The Free Church of Scotland elected him its moderator during its Jubilee year in 1893. He was a distinguished preacher and a man of catholic sympathies.

Published works[edit]

He attained considerable reputation as a poet. Among his works are The Bishop's Walk (1861), Olrig Grange (1872), Hilda among the Broken Gods (1878), Raban (1880), Kildrostan (1884), and A Heretic (1890). Some of these were written under the names of "Orwell" and Hermann Kunst.

Hymns[edit]

  • Earth was waiting, spent and restless[2]
  • Immortal, invisible, God only wise[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Walter Chalmers Smith". The Cyber Hymnal;. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  2. ^ "Earth was waiting, spent and restless" (PDF). Retrieved 2008-03-21. 
  3. ^ "Immortal, invisible, God only wise". The Cyber Hymnal;. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 

Further reading[edit]

Bailey, Albert Edward (1950). The Gospel in Hymns. New York: Charles Scribner's sons. pp. 455–456. 

Julian, John (June 1907). A Dictionary of Hymnology. London: John Murray. p. 1064. 

"Gifford Lecture Series". Retrieved 2007-01-30. 

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainCousin, John William (1910). A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature. London: J. M. Dent & Sons. Wikisource 

External links[edit]