Walter Schmidt (footballer)

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Walter Schmidt
Walter Schmidt im Eintracht Braunschweig Stadion (2009).jpg
Walter Schmidt in 2009.
Personal information
Date of birth (1937-08-02) August 2, 1937 (age 79)
Place of birth Bremerhaven, Germany
Height 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)
Playing position Midfielder/Defender
Club information
Current team
Retired
Youth career
TuS Recke
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1959–1970 Eintracht Braunschweig 299 (15)
National team
1965 West Germany B 1 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 19:02, 18 February 2009 (UTC).

Walter Schmidt (born August 2, 1937) is a retired German football player.[1]

Career[edit]

Walter Schmidt spent his entire professional career at Eintracht Braunschweig. He joined the club in 1959 and quickly became a regular in the Oberliga Nord, then the first tier of German football. In 1963 Eintracht Braunschweig became one of the founding members of the new nationwide Bundesliga. Schmidt, who missed only one league game between 1963 and 1967, was one of the key players of Eintracht's German championship winning team of 1967. However, an injury he suffered in 1969 forced Schmidt to retire from the game after missing the entire 1969–1970 season.[2]

Personal life[edit]

Schmidt is the father of musician DJ Pari.[3]

Honours[edit]

Post-retirement[edit]

In 1966, while still playing in the Bundesliga, Schmidt began his teacher education and later worked as a teacher for sports, mathematics and geography.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Schmidt, Walter" (in German). kicker.de. Retrieved 6 September 2012. 
  2. ^ Horst Bläsig/Alex Leppert, Ein Roter Löwe auf der Brust - Die Geschichte von Eintracht Braunschweig (2010) (German), publisher: Die Werkstatt, pages: 388-89
  3. ^ "DJ Pari und Marc Fehse präsentieren ihren Film „Power of Soul"". http://szene38.de. Retrieved 7 October 2015.  External link in |publisher= (help)
  4. ^ "Profile of Walter Schmidt" (in German). Retrieved 6 September 2012. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]