Wanaque, New Jersey

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Wanaque, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Wanaque
Location of Wanaque in Passaic County. Inset: Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Location of Wanaque in Passaic County. Inset: Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wanaque, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Wanaque, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°02′36″N 74°17′23″W / 41.043436°N 74.289748°W / 41.043436; -74.289748Coordinates: 41°02′36″N 74°17′23″W / 41.043436°N 74.289748°W / 41.043436; -74.289748[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Passaic
Incorporated March 22, 1918
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Daniel Mahler (term ends December 31, 2018)[3]
 • Administrator Thomas Carroll[4]
 • Clerk Katherine Falone[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 9.253 sq mi (23.965 km2)
 • Land 7.990 sq mi (20.694 km2)
 • Water 1.263 sq mi (3.271 km2)  13.65%
Area rank 215th of 566 in state
5th of 16 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 220 ft (70 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 11,116
 • Estimate (2014)[10] 11,447
 • Rank 220th of 566 in state
10th of 16 in county[11]
 • Density 1,391.2/sq mi (537.1/km2)
 • Density rank 348th of 566 in state
13th of 16 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07420 - Haskell[12]
07465 - Wanaque[13]
Area code(s) 973 Exchanges: 248, 616, 831, 835, 839[14]
FIPS code 3403176730[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885431[1][17]
Website www.wanaqueborough.com
Aerial view of Wanaque (lower right) and Wanaque Reservoir. Photo: Erlend Bjørtvedt

Wanaque (pronounced WAHN-a-cue[18][19]) is a borough in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 11,116,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 850 (+8.3%) from the 10,266 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 555 (+5.7%) from the 9,711 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Wanaque was incorporated as an independent borough on February 23, 1918, when Pompton Township was split up into three boroughs, along with Bloomingdale and Ringwood, based on the results of a referendum held on March 22, 1918.[21]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 9.253 square miles (23.965 km2), including 7.990 square miles (20.694 km2) of land and 1.263 square miles (3.271 km2) of water (13.65%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Haskell, Lake Inez, Lake Washington, Meadow Brook Lake, Midvale, Ramapo Lake, Rotten Pond, Stephens Lake and Upper Midvale.[22]

Both Wanaque (formerly Midvale) and Haskell have their own ZIP code and are served by its own separate post office.

According to local history, the name Wanaque (original pronunciation 'Wa Na Kee') is thought to have been derived from the Lenni Lenape Native American word meaning "land of sassafras".[23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 2,916
1930 3,119 7.0%
1940 3,143 0.8%
1950 4,222 34.3%
1960 7,126 68.8%
1970 8,636 21.2%
1980 10,025 16.1%
1990 9,711 −3.1%
2000 10,266 5.7%
2010 11,116 8.3%
Est. 2014 11,447 [10][24] 3.0%
Population sources: 1920[25]
1920-1930[26] 1930-1990[27]
2000[28][29] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 11,116 people, 4,018 households, and 3,026 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,391.2 per square mile (537.1/km2). There were 4,184 housing units at an average density of 523.7 per square mile (202.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 87.48% (9,724) White, 3.07% (341) Black or African American, 0.40% (45) Native American, 4.65% (517) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 2.25% (250) from other races, and 2.14% (238) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.67% (1,075) of the population.[7]

There were 4,018 households, of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.1% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 20.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.07.[7]

In the borough, 20.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 30.2% from 45 to 64, and 18.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.8 years. For every 100 females there were 91.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $89,459 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,457) and the median family income was $98,081 (+/- $7,333). Males had a median income of $62,454 (+/- $4,289) versus $49,421 (+/- $6,017) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,579 (+/- $3,293). About 1.0% of families and 2.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 0.8% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Same-sex couples headed 20 households in 2010, a decline from the 22 counted in 2000.[31]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 10,266 people, 3,444 households, and 2,689 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,286.8 people per square mile (496.7/km2). There were 3,500 housing units at an average density of 438.7 per square mile (169.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 90.67% White, 1.51% African American, 0.34% Native American, 3.62% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.06% from other races, and 1.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.40% of the population.[28][29]

There were 3,444 households out of which 37.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.2% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.9% were non-families. 16.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.86 and the average family size was 3.23.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.4% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 31.7% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $66,113, and the median income for a family was $71,127. Males had a median income of $43,675 versus $33,380 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,403. About 2.6% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.5% of those under age 18 and 4.1% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Law and government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Wanaque is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Wanaque, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[32][33]

As of 2015, the Mayor of Wanaque Borough is Republican Daniel Mahler, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018. Members of the Borough Council are Thomas Balunis (R, 2015), Dominick Cortellessa (R, 2016), Ed Leonard (R, 2016), Donald Pasquariello (R, 2017), Robert Pettet (R, 2017) and Eric Willse (R, 2015).[34][35][36][37][38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Wanaque is located in the 11th Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 39th state legislative district.[8][40][41] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Wanaque had been in the 40th state legislative district.[42] Prior to the 2010 Census, Wanaque had been part of the 5th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[42]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[44] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[45][46]

The 39th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Gerald Cardinale (R, Demarest) and in the General Assembly by Holly Schepisi (R, River Vale) and Robert Auth (R).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Passaic County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to staggered three-year terms office on a partisan basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle. At a reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members to serve for a one-year term.[50] As of 2015, Passaic County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Hector C. Lora (D, term ends December 31, 2015; Passaic),[51] Freeholder Deputy Director Bruce James (D, 2017; Clifton),[52] John W. Bartlett (D, 2015; Wayne),[53] Theodore O. Best, Jr. (D, 2017; Paterson),[54] Ronda Cotroneo (D, 2015; Ringwood),[55] Terry Duffy (D, 2016; West Milford),[56] and Pat Lepore (D, 2016; Woodland Park).[57][58][59] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Kristin M. Corrado (R, 2019),[60] Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik (2016)[61] and Surrogate Bernice Toledo (2016).[62][63][64]

Highlands protection[edit]

In 2004, the New Jersey Legislature passed the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act, which regulates the New Jersey Highlands region. Wanaque was included in the highlands preservation area and is subject to the rules of the act and the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Council, a division of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.[65] Some of the territory in the protected region is classified as being in the highlands preservation area, and thus subject to additional rules.[66]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 7,085 registered voters in Wanaque, of which 1,646 (23.2% vs. 31.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,191 (30.9% vs. 18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 3,243 (45.8% vs. 50.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[67] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 63.7% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 80.3% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).[67][68]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 51.7% of the vote (2,633 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 47.2% (2,400 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (55 votes), among the 5,132 ballots cast by the borough's 7,472 registered voters (44 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 68.7%.[69][70] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,798 votes (52.1% vs. 37.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,428 votes (45.2% vs. 58.8%) and other candidates with 46 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 5,374 ballots cast by the borough's 7,117 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.5% (vs. 70.4% in Passaic County).[71] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,452 votes (55.1% vs. 42.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,876 votes (42.1% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 39 votes (0.9% vs. 0.7%), among the 4,451 ballots cast by the borough's 6,132 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.6% (vs. 69.3% in the whole county).[72]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.1% of the vote (2,107 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 32.7% (1,042 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (38 votes), among the 3,235 ballots cast by the borough's 7,614 registered voters (48 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 42.5%.[73][74] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,802 votes (53.1% vs. 43.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,338 votes (39.4% vs. 50.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 194 votes (5.7% vs. 3.8%) and other candidates with 34 votes (1.0% vs. 0.9%), among the 3,396 ballots cast by the borough's 6,887 registered voters, yielding a 49.3% turnout (vs. 42.7% in the county).[75]

Education[edit]

The Wanaque Borough Schools serves students in public school for Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 928 students and 82.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.25:1.[76] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[77]) are Haskell Elementary School[78] (K–8, 404 students) and Wanaque Elementary School[79] (K–8; 544 students).[80][81]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Lakeland Regional High School, which serves students from the Boroughs of Ringwood and Wanaque. The high school is located in Wanaque and is part of the Lakeland Regional High School District.[82]

Wanaque is the site of Passaic County Community College's Wanaque Academic Center.[83]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 36.44 miles (58.64 km) of roadways, of which 29.30 miles (47.15 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.96 miles (7.98 km) by Passaic County and 2.18 miles (3.51 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[84]

Interstate 287 passes through Wanaque, where it is accessible at Exit 55, Ringwood Avenue (County Route 511).

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 197 route.[85]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Wanaque include:

Points of Interest[edit]

Elks Camp Moore is an Elks accredited summer overnight camp for children with special needs. The camp was founded in 1971 and includes many activities for the children such as a swimming pool, three playgrounds, a small playing field, a recreation hall, and rooms that house other fun activities. The campers stay for one week from Sunday until Saturday. Each week, 75 campers attend the camp. The camp is wheelchair accessible since handicapped children also attend the camp. People consider Camp Moore, the "Miracle on the Mountain". The camp is located high on top of a mountain overlooking Route 287, bordering both Wanaque and Haskell. Admission is free for the campers, and the camp is funded in part by local New Jersey Elks lodges.[89]

References[edit]

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  86. ^ Kolton, Tara. "Actor with Wanaque roots takes the Broadway stage in Newsies the Musical", Suburban Trends, September 6, 2012. Accessed January 27, 2015. "Kevin Carolan knew pretty early on that he was made for the stage.... Now the Wanaque native can be seen on the Broadway stage as part of the cast of Disney’s Newsies the Musical, playing the role of Teddy Roosevelt."
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  88. ^ Chris Port, Pro-Football-Reference.com. Accessed January 27, 2015.
  89. ^ Elks Camp Moore, New Jersey State Elks Association. Accessed January 27, 2015.

External links[edit]