Wantage Township, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Wantage Township, New Jersey
Township of Wantage
Old Clove Presbyterian Church
Map of Wantage Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Wantage Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wantage Township, New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wantage Township, New Jersey.
Wantage Township is located in Sussex County, New Jersey
Wantage Township
Wantage Township
Location in Sussex County
Wantage Township is located in New Jersey
Wantage Township
Wantage Township
Location in New Jersey
Wantage Township is located in the United States
Wantage Township
Wantage Township
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 41°15′08″N 74°37′58″W / 41.252204°N 74.632835°W / 41.252204; -74.632835Coordinates: 41°15′08″N 74°37′58″W / 41.252204°N 74.632835°W / 41.252204; -74.632835[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyFlag of Sussex County, New Jersey (free).png Sussex
FormedMay 30, 1754 (as precinct)
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forWantage, England
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorRonald Bassani (R, term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • Administrator / Municipal clerkMichael L. Restel[5]
Area
 • Total67.48 sq mi (174.78 km2)
 • Land66.76 sq mi (172.91 km2)
 • Water0.72 sq mi (1.87 km2)  1.07%
 • Rank18th of 565 in state
2nd of 24 in county[1]
Elevation538 ft (164 m)
Population
 • Total11,358
 • Estimate 
(2019)[11]
10,902
 • Rank215th of 566 in state
4th of 24 in county[12]
 • Density170.1/sq mi (65.7/km2)
  • Rank518th of 566 in state
18th of 24 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07461[13]
Area code(s)973[14]
FIPS code3403776790[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID0882257[1][17]
Websitewww.wantagetwp.com

Wantage Township is a township in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, its population was 11,358,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 971 (+9.3%) from the 10,387 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 900 (+9.5%) from the 9,487 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Wantage Township was formed as a precinct on May 30, 1754, from portions of Newton Township. It was incorporated as a township on February 21, 1798, as part of the state's initial group of 104 townships. Boundary exchanges were made with Frankford Township in both 1826 and 1834. Portions of the township were taken on October 14, 1891 to form the Borough of Deckertown (renamed Sussex borough in 1902).[19] The township was named for Wantage, England.[20]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 67.48 square miles (174.78 km2), including 66.76 square miles (172.91 km2) of land and 0.72 square miles (1.87 km2) of water (1.07%).[1][2] The township is located in the Kittatinny Valley which is a section of the Great Appalachian Valley that stretches for 700 miles (1,100 km) from Canada to Alabama.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Beemerville, Colesville, Hanford, Lake Neepaulin, Lake Rutherford, Lewisburg, Libertyville, Martins, Mount Salem, Papakating, Plumbsock, Quarryville, Rockport, Roys and Woodbourne.[21]

Rutan Hill, also called Volcanic Hill, located near the Beemerville section of Wantage Township, is New Jersey's only volcanic site that was last active over 440 million years ago.[22]

Rivers and streams in Wantage are tributaries in the Wallkill River watershed, and include:

The township completely surrounds Sussex borough, making it part of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.[23] Wantage borders the municipalities of Frankford Township, Hardyston Township, Lafayette Township, Montague Township, Sandyston Township and Vernon Township in Sussex County; and both Greenville and Minisink in Orange County, New York.[24][25][26]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18102,969
18203,30711.4%
18304,03422.0%
18403,908−3.1%
18503,9340.7%
18603,862−1.8%
18703,636−5.9%
18803,361−7.6%
18903,4121.5%
19002,217*−35.0%
19102,077−6.3%
19201,898−8.6%
19302,0759.3%
19402,37614.5%
19502,5437.0%
19603,30830.1%
19704,32930.9%
19807,26867.9%
19909,48730.5%
200010,3879.5%
201011,3589.3%
2019 (est.)10,902[11][27][28]−4.0%
Population sources:
1810–1920[29] 1840[30]
1850–1870[31] 1850[32] 1870[33]
1880–1890[34] 1890–1910[35] 1910–1930[36]
1930–1990[37] 2000[38][39] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 11,358 people, 3,910 households, and 3,116 families in the township. The population density was 170.1 per square mile (65.7/km2). There were 4,173 housing units at an average density of 62.5 per square mile (24.1/km2). The racial makeup was 95.23% (10,816) White, 1.21% (137) Black or African American, 0.11% (13) Native American, 0.99% (113) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.93% (106) from other races, and 1.52% (173) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.23% (594) of the population.[8]

Of the 3,910 households, 34.7% had children under the age of 18; 66.8% were married couples living together; 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present and 20.3% were non-families. Of all households, 15.8% were made up of individuals and 6.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.25.[8]

25.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 22.5% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.2 years. For every 100 females, the population had 98.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 96.7 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $72,270 (with a margin of error of +/− $7,478) and the median family income was $78,934 (+/− $9,462). Males had a median income of $55,509 (+/− $8,605) versus $41,013 (+/− $3,999) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,266 (+/− $2,047). About 4.3% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.[40]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 10,387 people, 3,441 households, and 2,856 families residing in the township. The population density was 154.8 people per square mile (59.8/km2). There were 3,663 housing units at an average density of 54.6 per square mile (21.1/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 97.10% White, 0.65% African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.67% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.41% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.89% of the population.[38][39]

There were 3,441 households, out of which 43.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.5% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.0% were non-families. 13.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.02 and the average family size was 3.33.[38][39]

In the township the population was spread out, with 29.4% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 8.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.0 males.[38][39]

The median income for a household in the township was $58,440, and the median income for a family was $65,339. Males had a median income of $42,697 versus $30,160 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,488. About 4.2% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[38][39]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Wantage Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 564) statewide that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[41] The governing body is comprised of the Township Committee, whose three members are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][42] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2022, members of the Wantage Township Committee are Mayor Ronald Bassani (R, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2022), Deputy Mayor Jon Morris (R, term on committee ends 2023; term as deputy mayor ends 2022) and William Gaechter (R, 2024).[3][43][44][45][46]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Wantage Township is located in the 5th Congressional District[47] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[9][48][49]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff).[50][51] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[52] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[53][54]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Parker Space (R, Wantage Township) and Hal Wirths (R, Hamburg).[55]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Commissioner Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[56] As of 2022, Sussex County's Commissioners are Commissioner Director Anthony Fasano (R, Hopatcong, term as commissioner and as commissioner director ends December 31, 2022),[57] Deputy Director Chris Carney (R, Frankford Township, term as commissioner ends 2024; term as deputy director ends 2022),[58] Dawn Fantasia (R, Franklin, 2024),[59] Jill Space (R, Wantage Township, 2022; appointed to serve an unexpired term)[60] and Herbert Yardley (R, Stillwater Township, 2023).[61][62] In May 2022, Jill Space was appointed to fill the seat expiring in December 2022 that had been held by Sylvia Petillo until she resigned from office.[63]

Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeffrey M. Parrott (R, Wantage Township, 2026),[64] Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, Hampton Township, 2022)[65] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, Frankford Township, 2023).[66] The County Administrator is Gregory V. Poff II, whose appointment expires in 2025.[67][68]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 7,397 registered voters in Wantage Township, of which 969 (13.1% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 3,315 (44.8% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 3,104 (42.0% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 9 voters registered as Libertarians or Greens.[69] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 65.1% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 86.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[69][70]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 3,269 votes (62.8% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,800 votes (34.6% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 119 votes (2.3% vs. 2.1%), among the 5,203 ballots cast by the township's 7,467 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.7% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[71] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 3,454 votes (62.2% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,987 votes (35.8% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 74 votes (1.3% vs. 1.5%), among the 5,551 ballots cast by the township's 7,319 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.8% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[72] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 3,300 votes (67.0% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,564 votes (31.7% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 48 votes (1.0% vs. 1.3%), among the 4,928 ballots cast by the township's 6,500 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.8% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[73]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 70.0% of the vote (2,107 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 27.0% (812 votes), and other candidates with 3.0% (89 votes), among the 3,038 ballots cast by the township's 7,582 registered voters (30 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 40.1%.[74][75] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 2,602 votes (63.7% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 999 votes (24.5% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 388 votes (9.5% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 59 votes (1.4% vs. 1.3%), among the 4,084 ballots cast by the township's 7,192 registered voters, yielding a 56.8% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[76]

Education[edit]

Public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade attend the schools of the Sussex-Wantage Regional School District, together with students from Sussex Borough.[77] As of the 2019–20 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 1,049 students and 99.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.6:1.[78] Schools in the district (with 2019–20 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[79]) are Clifton E. Lawrence School[80] in Wantage, with 376 students in grades K–2, Wantage Elementary School[81] in Wantage, with 340 students in grades 3–5 and Sussex Middle School[82] in Sussex, with 328 students in grades 6–8.[83][84][85][86]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students from both Sussex and Wantage attend High Point Regional High School, together with students from Branchville, Frankford Township, Lafayette Township and Montague Township.[87][88][89] As of the 2019–20 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 866 students and 76.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.3:1.[90] Seats on the high school district's nine-member board of education are allocated based on the population of the constituent municipalities, with seven seats assigned to Wantage Township.[91]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

Route 23 and CR 519 northbound concurrency in Wantage Township

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 172.15 miles (277.05 km) of roadways, of which 119.72 miles (192.67 km) were maintained by the municipality, 35.31 miles (56.83 km) by Sussex County and 17.12 miles (27.55 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[92]

Route 23, Route 284, CR 519 and CR 565 all pass through the township. Route 284 connects to NY 284, providing access to U.S. Route 6.

Aviation[edit]

Sussex Airport, a small general aviation airport, is located in Wantage Township.[93]

Wineries[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Wantage Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor & Committee, Wantage Township. Accessed July 28, 2022.
  4. ^ 2022 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 1, 2022.
  5. ^ Administration Office, Wantage Township. Accessed July 28, 2022.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Wantage, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Wantage township, Sussex County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Wantage township Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  11. ^ a b QuickFacts for Wantage township, Sussex County, New Jersey; Sussex County, New Jersey; New Jersey from Population estimates, July 1, 2019, (V2019), United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Wantage, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Wantage, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  15. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  17. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 233. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  20. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 25, 2015.
  21. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed December 21, 2014.
  22. ^ Lewis, J. Volney and Kümmel, Henry B. (1940). Bulletin 50: Geologic Series. The Geology of New Jersey. Trenton, New Jersey: Bureau of Geology and Topography. : 109.
  23. ^ DeMarco, Megan. "Voters to decide whether to merge two Princetons into one", The Star-Ledger, November 3, 2011. Accessed January 8, 2017. "There are 22 sets of 'doughnut towns' in New Jersey, those where one town wraps around the other town". Note that following voter approval of the Princeton merger, 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" remain.
  24. ^ Home Page, Wantage Township. Accessed March 11, 2020. "The township completely surrounds Sussex borough and borders the municipalities of Frankford Township, Hardyston Township, Lafayette Township, Montague Township, Sandyston Township, and Vernon Township in Sussex County; and Greenville and Minisink in Orange County, New York."
  25. ^ Sussex County Map, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed March 10, 2020.
  26. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  27. ^ Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  28. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  29. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed May 23, 2013.
  30. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  31. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, pp. 271-272, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed February 27, 2013. "Wantage is on the north of the county between Montague and Vernon. Population in 1850, 3,934; in 1860, 3,862; and in 1870, 3,636."
  32. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  33. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  34. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  35. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed February 27, 2013. Source shows a population of 2,419 as compared to the 3,412 shown in the 1890 Census. The 1910 Census broke out a population of 993 for Sussex borough, which had not been formed until 1891, after the population was enumerated for 1890.
  36. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  37. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  38. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Wantage township, New Jersey Archived January 14, 2004, at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 31, 2016.
  39. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Wantage township, Sussex County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  40. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Wantage township, Sussex County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  41. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  42. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  43. ^ 2022 Municipal Data Sheet, Wantage Township. Accessed July 28, 2022.
  44. ^ Summary Results Report November 2, 2021 General Election Official Results, Sussex County, New Jersey, updated November 22, 2021. Accessed January 1, 2022.
  45. ^ Election Summary November 3, 2020 General Election Official Amended Results, Sussex County, New Jersey, updated December 10, 2020. Accessed January 1, 2021.
  46. ^ Sussex County, New Jersey General Election November 5, 2019, Official Results Summary Report, Sussex County, New Jersey, dated November 8, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  47. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  48. ^ 2019 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  49. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  50. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  51. ^ Biography, Congressman Josh Gottheimer. Accessed January 3, 2019. "Josh now lives in Wyckoff, New Jersey with Marla, his wife who was a federal prosecutor, and their two young children, Ellie and Ben."
  52. ^ U.S. Sen. Cory Booker cruises past Republican challenger Rik Mehta in New Jersey, PhillyVoice. Accessed April 30, 2021. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  53. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "Menendez, who started his political career in Union City, moved in September from Paramus to one of Harrison's new apartment buildings near the town's PATH station.."
  54. ^ Home, sweet home: Bob Menendez back in Hudson County. nj.com. Accessed April 30, 2021. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  55. ^ Legislative Roster, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2022.
  56. ^ About County Government, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022. "Sussex County is governed by five (5) Commissioners who are elected by the voters of Sussex County. Each serves on the county’s Board of County Commissioners for a term of three (3) years, after which time they can seek re‐election or retire.... The Commissioners are elected at‐large to serve three‐year staggered terms. The five Commissioners elect a director from among themselves to run their meetings and to serve as a spokesperson for the board."
  57. ^ Anthony Fasano, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  58. ^ Chris Carney, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  59. ^ Dawn Fantasia, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  60. ^ Jill Space, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  61. ^ Herbert Yardley, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  62. ^ Board of County Commissioners, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  63. ^ Scruton, Bruce A. "Sussex County Republicans choose Jill Space to fill board of commissioners vacancy", New Jersey Herald, May 2, 2022. Accessed May 3, 2022. "Jill Space was unanimously selected to fill a vacancy on the five-member Board of County Commissioners during Saturday's Sussex County Republican Committee convention. Space was sworn in shortly after she was selected to fill the unexpired term of Sylvia Petillo, who resigned from the board last month when she moved to nearby Warren County."
  64. ^ Contact Us, Sussex County Clerk. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  65. ^ Administration, Sussex County Sheriff's Office. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  66. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Surrogate. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  67. ^ County Administrator, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  68. ^ Sussex County Official Directory 2021, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  69. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Sussex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  70. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  71. ^ General Election November 6, 2012: District Report - Group Detail Archived June 6, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  72. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  73. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  74. ^ "Governor - Sussex County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  75. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Sussex County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  76. ^ 2009 Governor: Sussex County Archived June 6, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  77. ^ Sussex-Wantage Regional Board of Education District Policy 0110 - Identification, Sussex-Wantage Regional School District. Accessed January 22, 2022. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Pre-Kindergarten through eight in the Sussex-Wantage Regional School District. Composition: The Sussex-Wantage Regional School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Sussex Borough and Wantage Township."
  78. ^ District information for Sussex-Wantage Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2021.
  79. ^ School Data for the Sussex-Wantage Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2021.
  80. ^ Clifton E. Lawrence School, Sussex-Wantage Regional School District. Accessed January 22, 2022.
  81. ^ Wantage Elementary School, Sussex-Wantage Regional School District. Accessed January 22, 2022.
  82. ^ Sussex Middle School, Sussex-Wantage Regional School District. Accessed January 22, 2022.
  83. ^ School Hours, Sussex-Wantage Regional School District. Accessed January 22, 2022.
  84. ^ School Performance Reports for the Sussex-Wantage Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed January 22, 2022.
  85. ^ Public School Directory 2020-2021, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 22, 2022.
  86. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Sussex-Wantage Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  87. ^ Sussex-Wantage Regional School District 2014 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 18, 2020. "Our district serves over 1,200 students in three schools: Pre-School through Grade 2 in the Clifton E. Lawrence School, Grades 3–5 in the Wantage School, and Grades 6–8 in the Sussex Middle School. Our students attend High Point Regional High School in Grade 9, along with students from the Lafayette and Frankford Township School Districts."
  88. ^ High Point Regional High School 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 18, 2020. "High Point Regional High School is a comprehensive high school serving the diversified needs of the five surrounding municipalities of Branchville, Frankford, Lafayette, Sussex and Wantage. In addition, we are in a send/receive relationship with the Montague school district."
  89. ^ "2019-20 School Profile", High Point Regional High School. Accessed June 18, 2020. "Located 63 miles northwest of Manhattan in bucolic Sussex, County NJ, High Point serves students from six municipalities: Branchville, Lafayette, Frankford, Montague, Sussex, and Wantage."
  90. ^ School data for High Point Regional High School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2021.
  91. ^ Board of Education, Sussex-Wantage Regional School District. Accessed June 18, 2020.
  92. ^ Sussex County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  93. ^ Sussex Airport, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed February 27, 2013.
  94. ^ Nick Boyle, Baltimore Ravens. Accessed June 8, 2016.
  95. ^ About, Nicholas D'Agostino. Accessed October 20, 2015. "Raised in Wantage, New Jersey, Nicholas and his twin brother Anthony were diagnosed with a muscle disease called Spinal Muscular Atrophy at 18 months old and were both confined to power wheelchairs at the young age of 6."
  96. ^ Staff. "CNN's Lou Dobbs says wife was shot at - and blames critics of his immigration views", New York Daily News, October 30, 2009. Accessed April 2, 2011. "His wife and driver were outside the Wantage home Oct. 5 when they heard the gunshot, said State Police Sgt. Stephen Jones."
  97. ^ Full Biography, United States House of Representatives. Accessed October 20, 2015. "Scott resides in Wantage Township in Sussex County with his wife, Mary Ellen, and their two daughters, Jennifer and Brittany."
  98. ^ Judson Kilpatrick, Gettysburg National Military Park. Accessed October 20, 2015. "Hugh Judson Kilpatrick, more commonly referred to as Judson Kilpatrick, was born on his family farm in Wantage Township, near Deckertown, New Jersey."
  99. ^ Parker Space, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed October 20, 2015.
  100. ^ Harold J. Wirths; Commissioner for the New Jersey Department of Labor, Governor of New Jersey. Accessed October 31, 2016. "Wirths lives in Wantage with his wife and two daughters."

External links[edit]