Warrington Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

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Warrington Township
Nathaniel Irwin House
Nathaniel Irwin House
Location of Warrington Township in Bucks County
Location of Warrington Township in Bucks County
Warrington Township is located in Pennsylvania
Warrington Township
Warrington Township
Location in Pennsylvania
Warrington Township is located in the United States
Warrington Township
Warrington Township
Warrington Township (the United States)
Coordinates: 40°14′23″N 75°08′30″W / 40.23972°N 75.14167°W / 40.23972; -75.14167Coordinates: 40°14′23″N 75°08′30″W / 40.23972°N 75.14167°W / 40.23972; -75.14167
CountryUnited States of America
StatePennsylvania
Area
 • Total13.79 sq mi (35.71 km2)
 • Land13.70 sq mi (35.47 km2)
 • Water0.09 sq mi (0.24 km2)
Elevation
338 ft (103 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total23,418
 • Estimate 
(2016)[2]
24,227
 • Density1,768.78/sq mi (682.95/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
Postal code
18976 and 18914
Area code(s)215
FIPS code42-017-81048
Websitewarringtontownship.org

Warrington Township is a township in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. Warrington Township is a suburb of Philadelphia. The population was 23,418 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

Warrington Township was founded in October 1734, and is named after the town of Warrington in Cheshire, England or, possibly, after the hamlet of Warrington in Buckinghamshire, England. The early township consisted of four villages: Warrington, Neshaminy, Tradesville, and Pleasantville.[3] Warrington was located at the intersection of Bristol Road and the Doylestown-Willow Grove Turnpike, now known as Easton Road (Pennsylvania Route 611).[3]

Neshaminy, originally known as Warrington Square, was centered at Street Road and the Turnpike (PA 611), but became known as Neshaminy because of its proximity to the Little Neshaminy Creek. The Village of Tradesville was near Lower State Road and was originally known as Stuckert's Corner because of a store operated by a man named Stuckert.

The Village of Pleasantville (or Eureka) was located near Lower State Road and County Line Road. It was the location of the first church in the township, The Reformed Church of Pleasantville, founded in 1840.[4]

In 2010, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries proposed to build the largest warehouse facility in Pennsylvania near residential neighborhoods in Warrington, leading to vocal community opposition.[5][6] Teva eventually chose a less controversial site in Northeast Philadelphia.[7]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19301,139
19401,30714.7%
19502,33678.7%
19604,14877.6%
19707,55082.0%
198010,70441.8%
199012,16913.7%
200017,58044.5%
201023,41833.2%
Est. 201624,227[2]3.5%
[8]

As of the 2010 census, the township was 86.3% Non-Hispanic White, 2.1% Black or African American, 0.2% Native American, 6.1% Asian, and 1.4% were two or more races. 4.2% of the population were of Hispanic or Latino ancestry.[9] Much alike the rest of Bucks County, Warrington has seen a surge in its Indian and Mexican populations.

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 17,580 people, 6,124 households, and 4,807 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,276.8 people per square mile (492.9/km²). There were 6,314 housing units at an average density of 458.6/sq mi (177.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 94.16% White, 1.93% African American, 0.07% Native American, 2.50% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.53% from other races, and 0.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.56% of the population.[10]

There were 6,124 households, out of which 42.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.9% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.5% were non-families. 16.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.86 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the township the population was spread out, with 29.1% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 34.5% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 8.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $66,364, and the median income for a family was $76,065 (these figures had risen to $86,754 and $100,678 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[11]). Males had a median income of $49,643 versus $34,175 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,810. About 1.8% of families and 2.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.

Educational institutions[edit]

Warrington Township is located in the Central Bucks School District. Educational institutions include:

Geography[edit]

Warrington is located at 40°14′23″N 75°08′30″W / 40.23972°N 75.14167°W / 40.23972; -75.14167 (40.239722, −75.141667).[12] According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 13.8 square miles (35.7 km²), all of it land. The town takes nameship after Warrington, England. Its villages include Eureka (also in Montgomery County,) Frog Hollow, Neshaminy, Palomino Farms, Tradesville (also in Doylestown Township,) and Warrington.[13]

Natural features include Fretz Valley, Griers Hill, Little Neshaminy Creek, Mill Creek, Park Creek, and Prospect Hill.[13] Warrington is in the Delaware River watershed.

Neighboring municipalities[edit]

Climate[edit]

According to the Köppen climate classification system, Warrington Township, Pennsylvania has a hot-summer, wet all year, humid continental climate (Dfa). Dfa climates are characterized by at least one month having an average mean temperature ≤ 32.0 °F (≤ 0.0 °C), at least four months with an average mean temperature ≥ 50.0 °F (≥ 10.0 °C), at least one month with an average mean temperature ≥ 71.6 °F (≥ 22.0 °C), and no significant precipitation difference between seasons. During the summer months, episodes of extreme heat and humidity can occur with heat index values ≥ 100 °F (≥ 38 °C). On average, the wettest month of the year is July which corresponds with the annual peak in thunderstorm activity. During the winter months, episodes of extreme cold and wind can occur with wind chill values < 0 °F (< -18 °C). The plant hardiness zone is 7a with an average annual extreme minimum air temperature of 0.5 °F (-17.5 °C).[14] The average seasonal (Nov-Apr) snowfall total is between 30 and 36 inches (76 and 91 cm), and the average snowiest month is February which corresponds with the annual peak in nor'easter activity.

Climate data for Warrington Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania (1981 – 2010 averages)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 39.1
(3.9)
42.3
(5.7)
50.6
(10.3)
62.5
(16.9)
72.4
(22.4)
81.3
(27.4)
85.4
(29.7)
83.8
(28.8)
76.9
(24.9)
65.6
(18.7)
54.7
(12.6)
43.3
(6.3)
63.3
(17.4)
Daily mean °F (°C) 30.5
(−0.8)
33.3
(0.7)
40.9
(4.9)
51.6
(10.9)
61.2
(16.2)
70.5
(21.4)
75.0
(23.9)
73.5
(23.1)
66.2
(19.0)
54.5
(12.5)
44.8
(7.1)
34.9
(1.6)
53.2
(11.8)
Average low °F (°C) 21.9
(−5.6)
24.3
(−4.3)
31.1
(−0.5)
40.7
(4.8)
50.1
(10.1)
59.8
(15.4)
64.7
(18.2)
63.3
(17.4)
55.5
(13.1)
43.4
(6.3)
35.0
(1.7)
26.6
(−3.0)
43.1
(6.2)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.29
(84)
2.66
(68)
3.82
(97)
3.96
(101)
4.30
(109)
4.16
(106)
4.98
(126)
4.15
(105)
4.37
(111)
3.93
(100)
3.64
(92)
3.96
(101)
47.22
(1,199)
Average relative humidity (%) 66.6 63.4 59.1 58.2 62.5 67.4 67.9 70.2 71.5 70.2 68.6 69.1 66.2
Average dew point °F (°C) 20.7
(−6.3)
22.2
(−5.4)
27.7
(−2.4)
37.4
(3.0)
48.3
(9.1)
59.2
(15.1)
63.7
(17.6)
63.2
(17.3)
56.7
(13.7)
45.0
(7.2)
35.1
(1.7)
25.8
(−3.4)
42.2
(5.7)
Source: PRISM Climate Group[15]

Ecology[edit]

According to the A. W. Kuchler U.S. potential natural vegetation types, Warrington Township, Pennsylvania would have an Appalachian Oak (104) vegetation type with an Eastern Hardwood Forest (25) vegetation form.[16]

Transportation[edit]

Major roads in Warrington Township include U.S. Route 202, which runs southwest-northeast through the western part of the township along a two-lane parkway; Pennsylvania Route 611, which passes north-south through the eastern section of the Warrington Township on Easton Road; Pennsylvania Route 152, which heads north-south through the western portion of the township on Limeklin Pike; Street Road, which runs northwest-southeast through the middle of the township and is designated Pennsylvania Route 132 east of Pennsylvania Route 611; County Line Road, which runs northwest-southeast along the southwestern border with Montgomery County; Bristol Road, which runs northwest-southeast along the northeastern boundary of the township; Lower State Road, which runs southwest-northeast in the western part of Warrington Township; and Upper State Road, which runs southwest-northeast along the northwestern border of the township.[17] SEPTA provides bus service to Warrington Township along the SEPTA City Bus Route 55 line, which follows Pennsylvania Route 611 and heads north to Doylestown and south to Willow Grove and Olney Transportation Center in North Philadelphia.[18]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 13, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Township History". Warrington Township.
  4. ^ "From Wilderness to Bustling Community, A History of Warrington Township" by Delores Deabler Capone, 1976
  5. ^ Teva plan fails to sway residents, Bucks County Courier Times, February 17, 2010
  6. ^ TevaProject, Warrington Township Coalition
  7. ^ Teva picks N.E. Phila. for distribution center, Philadelphia Business Journal, October 27, 2010
  8. ^ http://www.dvrpc.org/data/databull/rdb/db82/appedixa.xls
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. ^ 2005–2007 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  13. ^ a b MacReynolds, George, Place Names in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Doylestown, Bucks County Historical Society, Doylestown, PA, 1942, P1.
  14. ^ "USDA Interactive Plant Hardiness Map". United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved June 27, 2019.
  15. ^ "PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State U". www.prism.oregonstate.edu. Retrieved June 26, 2019.
  16. ^ "U.S. Potential Natural Vegetation, Original Kuchler Types, v2.0 (Spatially Adjusted to Correct Geometric Distortions)". Data Basin. Retrieved July 31, 2019.
  17. ^ Bucks County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved January 10, 2016.
  18. ^ "Route 55 bus schedule" (PDF). SEPTA. Retrieved May 4, 2016.
  19. ^ "Josh Adams". UND.com. Retrieved July 29, 2016.
  20. ^ "Josh Adams". www.philadelphiaeagles.com. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  21. ^ "Mike McGlinchey". UND.com. Retrieved July 29, 2016.
  22. ^ "Margaret Livingston". New York Times. January 16, 1985. Retrieved November 13, 2017.

External links[edit]