Warrior Merit Medal (Prussia)

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Warrior Merit Medal
Krieger-Verdienstmedaille
Krieger-Verdienstmedaille.png
Warrior Merit Medal, 1872 version
Awarded by Prussia
TypeMilitary decoration
EligibilitySoldiers not in Prussian service
Awarded forMilitary merit
Description25 mm, silver medal
Statistics
First awarded1835
Last awarded1918
PRU Roter Adlerorden BAR.svg
Original ribbon (1835-1872)
D-PRU EK 1914 2 Klasse BAR.svg
Combatant's ribbon (1872-1918)
PRU Non-combatant ribbon.png
Non-combatant's ribbon (1888-1918)

The Warrior Merit Medal German: Krieger-Verdienstmedaille) was a military decoration of Prussia. Established by Friedrich Wilhelm III, it was primarily awarded to troops not in Prussian service. The first recipients were members of the Imperial Guard grenadier company guarding the Russian imperial residence during Friedrich Whilhelm's visit to St. Petersburg in 1835.[1]

Appearance[edit]

Both versions of the medal are circular and silver, 25 mm in diameter. The first version depicts the crowned cypher of Friedrich Wilhelm III on the obverse of the medal. The reverse bears the inscription KRIEGER VERDIENST (Warrior Merit) surrounded by a wreath of two laurel sprigs, tied at its base with a bow. The medal is suspended by a ring suspension and hangs from the ribbon of the Order of the Red Eagle.[2]

The later version of the medal depicts the crowned cipher of King Wilhelm I on the obverse. The reverse is also inscribed KRIEGER VERDIENST and surrounded by a thicker laurel wreath than the early version. The medal is suspended by a ring suspension and hangs from the black with white stripes kämpferband (combatants ribbon) or the white with black stripe nichtkämpferband (non-combatants ribbon).[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "PRUSSIA. Warrior Merit Medal on combatant's ribbon (PREUSSEN. Krieger-Verdienst-Medaille am Kämpferband), 1888-1918 issue". Medal-medaille.com. 2006-02-06. Retrieved 2013-05-21.
  2. ^ "Krieger-Verdienstmedaille". DHM Objektdatenbank (in German). Deutsches Historisches Museum. 2013-05-14. Retrieved 2013-05-21. External link in |publisher= (help)

External links[edit]