Warwick Economics Summit

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Warwick Economics Summit
Logo WES.png
Official logo
Dates February (dates vary)
Frequency Annual
Location(s) University of Warwick, UK
Years active 15
Inaugurated 2002
Next event 2018
Website
warwickeconomicssummit.com

The Warwick Economics Summit (abbreviated as WES) is one of the largest student-run conferences in Europe, run annually at the University of Warwick.[1] Past Summits have aimed to address issues covering a range of disciplines, including economics, development, politics and international relations. The event attracts students and visitors from all over the UK and across the world[2][3][4] and has hosted talks from many high-profile speakers, including serving Cabinet Ministers and multiple Nobel Laureates in the field of Economics.

History[edit]

2000s[edit]

The Warwick Economics Summit began in 2002 with an audience of 170 students. Early editions of the Summit saw Johannes Linn of the World Bank and Dr. Lopez-Claros from the IMF take to the stage. In 2005, 500 attended the Summit as it welcomed its first Nobel Laureate, Professor John F. Nash.[5]

By 2006, the Summit had welcomed Vince Cable to the University. Delegates heard from British economists John Kay and Paul Omerod, as well as Dr. Kori Udovicki, Assistant Secretary General of the UN. The 2009 edition focused on policy makers and central bankers with Kate Barker, a member of the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee as well as Professor Ewald Nowotny, Governor of the Austrian National Bank.

2010[edit]

Then Chancellor of the Exchequer, Alastair Darling spoke. The Summit hosted Marek Belka, the Head of the National Bank of Poland as a standalone talk.

2011[edit]

The Summit hosted speakers from the world of economics, but also from media such as Tim Harford[6] and the notorious rogue trader, Nick Leeson.[7][8]

2012[edit]

The 2012 Summit was the second to welcome a Nobel Laureate in Professor George Akerlof[9][10] – but it was Adam Posen of the Bank of England's MPC who attracted the attention of the press.[11] Other speakers included Professor Steven E. Landsburg (bestselling author of The Armchair Economist), Sanusi Lamido Sanusi (Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria)[12] and Rufus Yerxa (Deputy Director-General of the WTO).

2013[edit]

During the 2013 Summit, Vince Cable the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills returned to the lineup.[13] There was representation by the Bank of England through Andrew Bailey and Martin Weale, who made headlines with his call for a weaker pound to aid the recovery.[14][15][16][17][18] The event also featured Andrew Oswald[19] (Professor of Economics, Warwick), Sir Bob Kerslake (Head of the British Civil Service) and Supachai Panitchpakdi (Secretary General of UNCTAD).[20]

2014[edit]

The 2014 Summit, saw Warwick University host Professor Eric Maskin as the keynote speaker, the third Nobel Laureate to date.[21] Other speakers included Diane Coyle, Victoria Chick, Nasser Saidi, Gerard Lyons, Ann Pettifor, Ian Goldin,[22] Richard Lambert[23] and Luke Johnson.[24][25]

2015[edit]

In 2015, the Summit had a strong focus on international institutions with Vítor Constâncio from the ECB,[26][27] Zhu Min from the IMF, Dermot Nolan, the CEO of OFGEM[28] and Athanasios Orphanides; the former governor of the Central Bank of Cyprus. Speakers also included Partha Dasgupta, Jan Vincent Rostowski and Simon Anholt.

2016[edit]

The 2016 Summit featured prominent academics with the likes of Nobel Laureate Sir James Mirrlees and Nicholas Crafts,[29] as well as political leaders Enrico Letta[30] and Jean-François Copé. Also featured were Michael Møller, Scott Sumner and Mark Littlewood.[31]

2017[edit]

In 2017, the Summit featured a range of academics and policymakers. Fed Vice-Chairman Stanley Fischer,[32] in a widely-covered speech, made headlines with his comments on the Trump administration’s fiscal policy and plans for financial regulation.[33] [34] [35] [36] [37] The Summit also welcomed its fifth Nobel Laureate in Prof. Finn Kydland, Prof. Jeffrey Sachs (from Columbia University through video conference), FT Chief Economics Commentator Martin Wolf and Former Prime Minister of Benin Lionel Zinsou.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Langworth, Hannah. "Reaching the summit". The Gateway. 
  2. ^ "Student to attend Warwick Economics Summit". Harvard Gazette. 8 February 2012. 
  3. ^ "ASES attends Warwick Economics Summit 2014". University of Glasgow. 
  4. ^ Bailey, Oliver (25 November 2009). "Warwick Economics Summit". Lancaster Economics Society. 
  5. ^ "John Forbes Nash, Jr.". Scientific Library. 
  6. ^ Harford, Tim. "Speeches". 
  7. ^ "Warwick Economics Summit 2011". Why Study Economics. 27 February 2011. 
  8. ^ "Client Testimonials - Nick Leeson". Nick Leeson. 
  9. ^ Yap, Winston (18 February 2012). "George A. Akerlof – Phishing for Phools". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 
  10. ^ "Warwick welcomes a Nobel Laureate for the annual Economics Summit". PRLOG. 16 January 2012. 
  11. ^ Hamilton, Scott (18 February 2012). "Posen Says He’s ‘Comfortable’ With Bank of England’s Inflation Forecasts". Bloomberg.com. 
  12. ^ Lamido Sanusi, Sanusi. "Banking Reform and Its Impact on the Nigerian Economy" (PDF). Central Bank of Nigeria. 
  13. ^ "Cable demands rethink on Funding for Lending scheme". The Telegraph. 16 February 2013. 
  14. ^ "The balance of payments - speech by Martin Weale". Bank of England. 16 February 2013. 
  15. ^ Webb, Jason (16 February 2013). "BoE's Weale says does not favour nominal GDP target switch". Reuters. 
  16. ^ Aldrick, Philip (16 February 2013). "Exports can lead UK back to growth, says BoE's Martin Weale". The Telegraph. 
  17. ^ "Warwick Economics Summit". Wall Street Journal. 18 February 2013. 
  18. ^ Key, Tomas. "The Balance of Payments" (PDF). Bank of England. 
  19. ^ "When food reaches its happiness tipping point". Chatelaine. 15 April 2013. 
  20. ^ "Warwick Economics Summit 2013". Warwick University. 
  21. ^ "Warwick Economics Summit". Elbenomics. 15 January 2014. 
  22. ^ "DIARY - Top economic events to Feb 8". Reuters. 28 January 2014. 
  23. ^ Greaves, Simon (2 February 2014). "World diary: February 3 – February 9". The Financial Times. 
  24. ^ "Warwick Economics Summit 2014". University of Brussels. 
  25. ^ Jaiswal, Aakanksha (19 February 2014). "Warwick Economics Summit 2014". The Boar. 
  26. ^ Douglas, Jason. "ECB’S Constâncio: QE Criticisms Not Well-Founded". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 13 February 2015. 
  27. ^ Kelly, Jemima (13 Feb 2015). "Greece needs political deal with Europe to stop deposit outflows: Constancio". Reuters. 
  28. ^ "Dermot Nolan at Warwick Economics Summit". OFGEM. Retrieved 4 March 2015. 
  29. ^ Reisz, Matthew. "Warwick economics event aims to learn lessons of history". Times Higher Education. 
  30. ^ Khan, Shehab. "Brexit ‘will be the first step of the definitive decline of the EU,’ says former Prime Minister of Italy". The Independent. 
  31. ^ Khan, Shehab. "Warwick’s international Economics Summit, led entirely by students, praised by former Italian PM Enrico Letta for being ‘modern and creative’". The Independent. 
  32. ^ Fischer, Stanley. "I'd Rather Have Bob Solow Than an Econometric Model, But ...". federalreserve.gov. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  33. ^ Reid, Helen (12 Feb 2017). "Significant uncertainty' about fiscal policy under Trump: Fed's Fischer". Reuters. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  34. ^ Douglas, Jason (12 Feb 2017). "Fed’s Fischer Issues Warning on Bank Capital Requirements". Wall Street Journal. 
  35. ^ Meakin, Lucy. "Fischer Says Fed Focused on Goals Amid Trump Policy Uncertainty" (12 Feb 2017). Bloomberg. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  36. ^ Worstall, Tim (12 Feb 2017). "Fed's Fischer Forecasts That Trump Admin's Fiscal Policy Will Have No Effect At All.". Forbes. 
  37. ^ "Federal Reserve Vice Chair Stanley Fischer cites 'significant uncertainty' about fiscal policy under Trump". CNBC. 12 Feb 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017.