Washington State Route 124

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State Route 124 marker

State Route 124
Ice Harbor Drive
Map of Walla Walla County in southeastern Washington with SR 124 highlighted in red
Route information
Auxiliary route of US 12
Defined by RCW 47.17.235
Maintained by WSDOT
Length: 44.68 mi[3] (71.91 km)
Existed: 1964[1][2] – present
Tourist
routes:
Lewis and Clark Trail Scenic Byway
Major junctions
West end: US 12 in Burbank
  SR 125 near Prescott
East end: US 12 in Waitsburg
Location
Counties: Walla Walla
Highway system
SR 123 SR 125

State Route 124 (SR 124) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Washington. It extends 44.68 miles (71.91 km) from US 12 in Burbank, east to US 12 in Waitsburg. The route serves as a bypass of Walla Walla and as a connector from US 12 to Prescott.[4] SR 124 was established in 1964 after the 1964 highway renumbering, along its current route. Before SR 124 was established, the route from Burbank to SR 125 was Secondary State Highway 3D and the route from SR 125 to Waitsburg was Secondary State Highway 3E.[1][2]

Even though SR 124 was established in 1964, no signs went up until the law that made SR 124 was approved by the Washington State Legislature in 1970.[1][2] The section of SR 124 from Bubrank to Ice Harbor Road is officially designated the Ice Harbor Drive, named after the Ice Harbor Lock and Dam.[1][5] The portion of SR 124 from Piper Canyon Road to Waitsburg is designated as part of the Lewis and Clark Trail.

Route description[edit]

State Route 124 runs approximately 44.68 miles (71.91 km) from US 12 in Burbank, east to US 12 in Waitsburg. The route links the communities of Burbank, Prescott, and Waitsburg. The road intersects two major arterials: US 12 before ending at State Route 124.[4][6][7][8][9]

SR 124 (Ice Harbor Drive)[5] starts at an intersection with US 12 in northern Burbank and then goes northeast next to Hood Park and the Snake River before turning east past Burbank Heights to intersect Ice Harbor Road. At this point, the Ice Harbor Drive designation is given to Ice Harbor Road, which continues to the actual dam and lock, about 2.70 miles (4.35 km) from the intersection.[10] From the intersection the highway turns northeast past Slater, Ash, and Welland before continuing east past Eureka, Lamar, and Harsha before intersecting SR 125.[11]

Eastbound SR 124 in Downtown Waitsburg towards Preston Avenue (US 12)

From the intersection with SR 125, the highway goes east into Prescott, where SR 124 starts to parallel the route of the Palouse River and Coulee City Railroad, a railroad that runs from Wallula to Walla Walla, Oregon, Waitsburg, and Dayton.[12][13][14] After passing Robinson, the highway goes southeast and then south to Bolles, where SR 124 stops paralleling Palouse River and Coulee City Railroad, which then continues east to Waitsburg. After leaving Bolles, SR 124 goes east into Waitsburg and ends at US 12.[15]

History[edit]

WA-SSH3-D.svgWA-SSH3-E.svg
The shields of Secondary State Highway 3D (left) and Secondary State Highway 3E (right).

Most of the current route of SR 124 follows a portion of the Lewis and Clark Trail. The highway from Piper Canyon Road to Waitsburg follows a small section of the 1806 route that Lewis and Clark took from Fort Clatsop before splitting in Montana.[16] SR 124 became a state highway during the 1964 highway renumbering, in which the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) replaced the old system (Primary and Secondary Highways) with a new system (State Routes), which is still in use today. In the Primary and Secondary system, SR 124 from US 12 to SR 125 (then US 410) was Secondary State Highway 3D and SR 124 from SR 125 to SR 126 was Secondary State Highway 3E.

Secondary State Highway 3D (SSH 3D) was added in 1937, during the creation of the Primary State Highway system. The original route started at US 410 in Touchet and went north to Eureka and east to SSH 3E west of Prescott.[17][18] Later in 1951, SSH 3D was moved to a route from US 410 in Burbank to SSH 3E, the current route of SR 124 and in 1965, the route from Burbank to Ice Harbor Road was designated the Ice Harbor Drive.[1][5] SSH 3E was also added in 1937 and went from US 410 in Walla Walla north to SSH 3D and east past Prescott to Waitsburg. SSH 3E became SR 125 from Walla Walla to SSH 3D and SR 124 from SSH 3D to Waitsburg.[18][19]

Before and after the establishment, the route of SR 124 has gone through several documented WSDOT construction projects from 1941 to 2004.[20] Many were small, minor projects including repavings and intersection improvements. The first was a construction project that constructed SSH 3E from SSH 3D to Waitsburg, which took place in 1941.[20] The latest project was a realignment project along SR 124 east of Burbank. The project straightened a curve along the highway. It cost $145,589 USD and took place in 2004.[21][22]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire highway is in Walla Walla County.

Location mi[3] km Destinations Notes
Burbank 0.00 0.00 US 12 west – Wallula, Pasco, Yakima
5.23 8.42 Ice Harbor Road / Mounument Drive
34.61 55.70 SR 125 south – Walla Walla, College Place, Milton-Freewater, OR, Pendleton, OR
Waitsburg 44.68 71.91 US 12 west – Clarkston, Lewiston, ID
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Washington State Legislature. "RCW 47.17.235: State Route 124". Retrieved July 11, 2008. 
  2. ^ a b c Session Laws of the State of Washington. 1964 Title 47, Chapter 47.17, Section 47.17.235. "A state highway to be known as state route number 124 is established as follows: Beginning at a junction with state route number 12 in the vicinity of Burbank, thence northeasterly by the most feasible route to a point in the vicinity of Eureka, thence easterly by the most feasible route to a junction with state route number 125 in the vicinity of Prescott, thence easterly to a junction with state route number 12 in the vicinity northeast of Waitsburg."
  3. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation. "State Highway Log, 2006" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on April 10, 2008. Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  4. ^ a b Google (August 30, 2008). "State Route 124 Overview Map" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  5. ^ a b c Session Laws of the State of Washington. 1964 Title 47, Chapter 47.17, Section 47.17.235. "That portion of state route number 124 lying between the junction with state route number 12 and the county road to Ice Harbor Dam to be known as "Ice Harbor Drive"."
  6. ^ Official State Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (2008-2009 ed.). 1:842,000. Official State Highway Maps. Cartography by U.S. Geological Survey. Olympia, Washington: Washington State Department of Transportation. 2008. § 7G. Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  7. ^ The Road Atlas (Map). Rand McNally. 2008. p. 108. § K15. ISBN 0-528-93961-0. 
  8. ^ The Road Atlas (Map). Rand McNally. 2008. p. 108. § K16. ISBN 0-528-93961-0. 
  9. ^ The Road Atlas (Map). Rand McNally. 2008. p. 108. § K17. ISBN 0-528-93961-0. 
  10. ^ Google (August 30, 2008). "Ice Harbor Road Map" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  11. ^ Google (August 30, 2008). "State Route 124 Map (Burbank to SR 125)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  12. ^ Washington State Railroad System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by U.S. Geological Survey. Washington State Department of Transportation. August 2007. Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  13. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation. "Railroad Contacts in Washington State". Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  14. ^ Watco Companies. "Watco Companies Railroads". Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  15. ^ Google (August 30, 2008). "State Route 124 Map (SR 125 to Waitsburg)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  16. ^ Map of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail (PDF) (Map). National Park Service. August 21, 2006. Retrieved September 1, 2008. 
  17. ^ Washington State Legislature (1937). "An act relating to public highways, creating and establishing, describing and designating the primary state highways of the State of Washington and declaring an emergency.". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Olympia, WA: State of Washington. 1937 chapter 190, p. 1000. : "Secondary State Highway No. 3D; beginning at Touchet on Primary State Highway No. 3, thence in a northerly direction by the most feasible route to a point south of Eureka, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to Prescott."
  18. ^ a b Washington State Legislature (1937) [1937]. "190". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 1000. Retrieved August 10, 2008. 
  19. ^ Washington State Legislature (1937). "An act relating to public highways, creating and establishing, describing and designating the primary state highways of the State of Washington and declaring an emergency.". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Olympia, WA: State of Washington. 1937 chapter 190, p. 1000. : "Secondary State Highway No. 3E; beginning at Walla Walla on Primary State Highway No. 3, thence in a northerly direction by the most feasible route to Prescott on Secondary State Highway No. 3D, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to a junction on Primary State Highway No. 3 in the vicinity northeast of Waitsburg."
  20. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation (August 8, 2007). "Current List of SR 124 R/W Plans" (PDF). Retrieved August 30, 2008. [dead link]
  21. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2004). "2004 Construction Highlights - SR 124, East Jct. US 12 Reconstruction Project Evaluation". Archived from the original on July 8, 2008. Retrieved August 30, 2008. 
  22. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2004). "SR 124 East Jct. US 12 Reconstruction - Complete April 2004". Archived from the original on August 2, 2008. Retrieved August 30, 2008. 

External links[edit]

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