Washington State Route 23

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State Route 23 marker

State Route 23
SR 23 is highlighted in red.
Route information
Defined by RCW 47.17.095
Maintained by WSDOT
Length: 66.00 mi[2] (106.22 km)
Existed: 1964[1] – present
Major junctions
South end: US 195 near Steptoe
  I‑90 / US 395 in Sprague
North end: SR 28 in Harrington
Location
Counties: Whitman, Lincoln
Highway system
SR 22 SR 24

State Route 23 (SR 23) is a 66-mile (106.22 km) long state highway traversing Whitman and Lincoln counties in the U.S. state of Washington. The highway extends northwest from U.S. Route 195 (US 195) in Steptoe through Sprague to an intersection with SR 28 in Harrington. It serves as a route from Interstate 90 and US 395 in Sprague towards Pullman via US 195, and has a longer child route, SR 231 that travels north from SR 23 near Sprague to Reardan and Chewelah.

SR 23 was formally established in 1964 using roadways that have existed since 1937 as Secondary State Highway 11F (SSF 11C) from Sprague to Harrington and Secondary State Highway 11C (SSH 11C) from Steptoe to Sprague. SSH 11C was removed from Steptoe to Ewan in 1943 and became an extension of Primary State Highway 18 (PSH 18) and was completely designated as PSH 18 in 1953 and removed from the highway system in 1961. A second child route, SR 230, is proposed to be built from Ritzville to Ewan, but has not been built.

Route description[edit]

Steptoe, the southern terminus of SR 23

State Route 23 (SR 23) originates as Cashup Avenue at an intersection with U.S. Route 195 (US 195) in Steptoe, about 10 miles (16.1 km) north of Colfax. The road has 2 undivided lanes as it travels west through mostly rural areas and becomes Front Street in Saint John. Leaving the town, the highway turns northwest following Pleasant Valley Creek, intersecting the proposed terminus of SR 230 in Ewan and a road serving Lamont,[3] passing several lakes, and leaving Whitman County. After entering Lincoln County, the highway crosses over Union Pacific and BNSF rail lines,[4] then passes through Sprague. The highway serves as exit 245 on Interstate 90 (I-90) and US 395 in a diamond interchange,[5] and is the busiest point on the route with an annual average daily traffic of 1,300 vehicles in 2011.[6] North of the interchange, SR 231 splits off and travels north towards Reardan,[7] being 8.97 miles (14.44 km) longer than SR 23.[2] The highway continues northwest into Harrington, intersecting Coal Creek Road serving Harrington High School and becoming Sherlock Street.[8] The road crosses a BNSF rail line and turns north,[4] becoming 3rd Street until the route ends at SR 28.[9]

History[edit]

Shields of former SSH 11C and SSH 11F

SR–23 was formally established in 1964,[1] but the roadway has existed as early as 1926.[10][11] The road was officially added to the state highway system as two highways in 1937 as Secondary State Highway 11C (SSH 11C) from Steptoe to Sprague and Secondary State Highway 11F (SSF 11C) from Sprague to Harrington.[12][13] SSH 11C was shortened in 1943 to a Ewan–Sprague route and the former section to Steptoe became part of an extension of Primary State Highway 18 (PSH 18).[14][15][16] SSH 11C was completely removed from the system in 1951,[17][18][19] and it took effect in 1961 as the number was reused elsewhere.[20] SR 230 is proposed to connect SR 23 at Ewan to Interstate 90 (I-90) in Ritzville, but has not yet been built.[3]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[2] km Destinations Notes
Whitman Steptoe 0.00 0.00 US 195 – Colfax, Spokane Southern terminus
Lincoln Sprague 43.66–
43.81
70.26–
70.51
I‑90 / US 395 – Seattle, Spokane Interchange
44.28 71.26 SR 231 north – Reardan Southern terminus of SR 231
Harrington 66.00 106.22 SR 28 – Odessa, Davenport Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "47.17.095: State route No. 23", Revised Code of Washington, Washington State Legislature, 1970, retrieved January 6, 2013 
  2. ^ a b c Staff (2011), State Highway Log: Planning Report 2011, SR 2 to SR 971 (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, pp. 500–507, retrieved January 6, 2013 
  3. ^ a b "47.17.440: State route No. 230", Revised Code of Washington, Washington State Legislature, 1970, retrieved January 6, 2013 
  4. ^ a b 2011 Washington State Rail System (PDF) (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 2012. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  5. ^ Staff (June 1, 2010), SR 90 – Exit 245 (PDF), retrieved January 6, 2013 
  6. ^ Staff (2011), 2011 Annual Traffic Report (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, pp. 101–102, retrieved January 6, 2013 
  7. ^ "47.17.445: State route No. 231", Revised Code of Washington, Washington State Legislature, 1970 
  8. ^ Harrington School District (2010), Harrington School District, retrieved January 6, 2013 
  9. ^ Google (January 6, 2013). "SR 23" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  10. ^ Junior Road Map of Washington (DJVU) (Map). Rand McNally. 1926. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  11. ^ Road Atlas: Spokane and Vicinity (DJVU) (Map). Rand McNally. 1926. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  12. ^ Washington State Legislature (1937), Session Laws of the State of Washington, Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.), Olympia: Washington State Legislature, p. 1008, retrieved January 6, 2013, (c) Secondary State Highway No. 11C; beginning at Sprague on Primary State Highway No. 11, thence in a southeasterly direction by the most feasible route by way of Ewan and St. John to Steptoe on Primary State Highway No. 3; (e) Secondary State Highway No. 11F; beginning at Sprague on Primary State Highway No. 11, thence in a northwesterly direction by the most feasible route to Harrington on Primary State Highway No. 7. 
  13. ^ Highways of the State of Washington (DJVU) (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally. Department of Highways. 1939. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  14. ^ Washington State Legislature (1943), Session Laws of the State of Washington, Session Laws of the State of Washington (1943 ed.), Olympia: Washington State Legislature, pp. 716, 723–724, retrieved January 6, 2013, SEC. 5. There is hereby established an extension to Primary State Highway No. 18, described as follows: Beginning at a point on Primary State Highway No. 11 in the vicinity of Ritzville, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to a junction with Primary State Highway No. 3 in the vicinity north of Colfax.; (c) Secondary State Highway No. 11C; beginning at Sprague on Primary State Highway No. 11, thence in a southeasterly direction by the most feasible route to a point in the vicinity of Ewan; (e) Secondary State Highway No. 11F; beginning at Sprague on Primary State Highway No. 11, thence in a northwesterly direction by the most feasible route to Harrington on Primary State Highway No. 7. 
  15. ^ Northwest, 1946 (Map). Rand McNally. 1946. p. 16. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  16. ^ Highways of the State of Washington (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally. Department of Highways. 1950. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  17. ^ Washington State Legislature (1951), Session Laws of the State of Washington, Session Laws of the State of Washington (1951 ed.), Olympia: Washington State Legislature, retrieved January 6, 2013 
  18. ^ Ritzville, 1953 (JPG) (Map). 1:125,000. United States Geological Survey. 1953. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  19. ^ Spokane, 1955 (JPG) (Map). 1:125,000. United States Geological Survey. 1955. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  20. ^ Washington State Legislature (1961), Session Laws of the State of Washington, Session Laws of the State of Washington (1961 ed.), Olympia: Washington State Legislature, pp. 521, 2650, retrieved January 6, 2013, also, beginning at a junction with primary state highway No. 18 in the vicinity west of Ewan, thence in a northwesterly direction to a junction with primary state highway No. 11 at Sprague; Secondary state highway No. 11F; beginning at Sprague on primary state highway No. 11, thence in a northwesterly direction to Harrington on primary state highway No. 7 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google

KML is from Wikidata