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Washington State Route 3

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State Route 3 marker

State Route 3
SR 3 is highlighted in red.
Route information
Defined by RCW 47.17.010
Maintained by WSDOT
Length: 59.81 mi[2] (96.25 km)
Existed: 1964[1] – present
Major junctions
South end: US 101 near Shelton
  SR 302 in Allyn-Grapeview
SR 16 in Gorst
SR 304 in Navy Yard City
SR 303 in Silverdale
SR 305 in Poulsbo
North end: SR 104 near Port Gamble
Location
Counties: Mason, Kitsap
Highway system
US 2 SR 4

State Route 3 (SR 3) is a 59.81-mile-long (96.25 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Washington, serving the Kitsap Peninsula in Mason and Kitsap counties. The highway begins at U.S. Route 101 (US 101) south of Shelton and travels northeast onto the Kitsap Peninsula through Belfair to Gorst, where it intersects SR 16 and begins its freeway. SR 3 travels west of Bremerton, Silverdale and Poulsbo before it terminates at the eastern end of the Hood Canal Bridge, signed as SR 104. The highway is designated as a Strategic Highway Network (STRAHNET) corridor under the National Highway System as the main thoroughfare connecting both parts of Naval Base Kitsap and is also part of the Highways of Statewide Significance program.

SR 3 was established during the 1964 highway renumbering and codified in 1970 as the successor to Secondary State Highway 14 (SSH 14) from Shelton to Belfair, Primary State Highway 14 (PSH 14) from Belfair to Gorst, and PSH 21 from Gorst to the Hood Canal Bridge. PSH 21 was previously part of State Road 21 from 1915 to 1937, while PSH 14 was part of State Road 14 and the Navy Yard Highway from 1919 to 1937. The present SR 3 freeway was opened in 1968 in the Bremerton area and was extended north to Poulsbo in 1973 and to Bangor in 1977.

Route description[edit]

SR 3 southbound approaching the western terminus of SR 16 in Gorst

SR 3 begins at a diamond interchange with US 101 south of Shelton in unincorporated Mason County on the Olympic Peninsula.[3] The highway travels north into Shelton at the end of Oakland Bay on 1st Street and crosses over a Puget Sound and Pacific Railroad line and Goldsborough Creek.[4][5][6] SR 3 turns east on Pine Street and leaves Shelton, traveling northeast along Oakland Bay and a US Navy rail line.[5][7] The highway continues north along Oakland Bay and Case Inlet past heavily forested areas to Allyn-Grapeview, where it serves as the western terminus of SR 302 at North Mason High School.[8][9] SR 3 travels towards the southern end of the Hood Canal and intersects the eastern termini of SR 106 and SR 300 in Belfair.[10][11] The highway continues northeast past Bremerton National Airport towards the community of Gorst in Kitsap County, where it forms the western terminus of SR 16.[12][13][14]

SR 3 becomes a four-lane divided freeway and travels northeast along the Sinclair Inlet to an interchange with SR 304 in Navy Yard City, serving the city of Bremerton and Naval Station Bremerton.[15][16][17] The freeway continues through western Bremerton past the diamond interchange with SR 310 and the community of Chico along Dyes Inlet.[18][19] SR 3 travels west of Silverdale past the western terminus of SR 303 at the Kitsap Mall and east of Naval Submarine Base Bangor in Bangor.[20][21][22] The freeway continues north towards Poulsbo past the termini of SR 308 and SR 305, which serve Keyport and Bainbridge Island respectively.[23][24][25] SR 3 travels north from Poulsbo as a two-lane road towards Port Gamble and ends at the eastern approach of the Hood Canal Bridge at an intersection with SR 104.[2][12][26]

Every year, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) conducts a series of surveys on its highways in the state to measure traffic volume. This is expressed in terms of average annual daily traffic (AADT), which is a measure of traffic volume for any average day of the year. In 2011, WSDOT calculated that the busiest section of SR 3 was between SR 16 in Gorst and SR 304 in Navy Yard City, serving 69,000 vehicles, while the least busiest section was southwest of Allyn-Grapeview at an intersection with Grapeview Loop Road, serving 6,600 vehicles.[27] SR 3 is designated as a STRAHNET corridor within National Highway System, connecting Naval Base Kitsap to the state highway system between Gorst and Bangor, while the rest of the highway is part of the system, which includes roadways important to the national economy, defense, and mobility.[28][29] WSDOT designates the entire route of SR 3 as a Highway of Statewide Significance,[30] which includes highways that connect major communities in the state of Washington.[31]

History[edit]

SR 3 southbound viewed from the SR 304 flyover ramp in Navy Yard City, built during the early 1970s.

SR 3 follows the route of a paved section of State Road 21 between Belfair and Port Gamble on the Kitsap Peninsula that was added to the state highway system in 1915.[32][33] The highway was later split between the Navy Yard Highway from Belfair to Bremerton and State Road 21 from Bremerton to Port Gamble in 1919.[34] In 1923, the state highway system was restructured and the Navy Yard Highway was numbered as State Road 14, while State Road 21 kept its designation.[35] The Navy Yard Highway was paved on a 48-mile-long (77 km) section connecting Union to Charleston and was dedicated by Naval Station Bremerton on June 13, 1923,[36] while the rest of the highway remained a gravel road into the 1930s.[37]

During the creation of the primary and secondary state highway system in 1937, the paved State Roads 14 and 21 kept their numerical designations and became PSH 14 and PSH 21, respectively. PSH 21 was extended southwest from Bremerton on the former Navy Yard Highway to Gorst, while PSH 14 turned south at Gorst and headed towards Tacoma. A branch of PSH 14, named SSH 14A, was designated on a gravel road that connected the main highway at Belfair to US 101 in Shelton.[38][39] In 1955, PSH 21 was extended southwest along PSH 14 from Gorst to Union, shortening PSH 14 to its current route as SR 16.[40][41]

During the 1964 highway renumbering, a new state route system replaced the existing primary and secondary state highways and SR 3 was designated along SSH 14A, PSH 14, and PSH 21 on its present route when it was codified in 1970.[1][42][43] Construction of the freeway section of SR 3 began in 1963 between SR 304 in Navy Yard City and Silverdale west of Bremerton and was opened in February 1968.[44][45] The freeway was extended north to Poulsbo in late 1973,[46][47] and further north to Naval Submarine Base Bangor in 1977 after the arrival of Ohio-class submarines at Bangor.[48][49] WSDOT re-built the interchange between SR 3 and SR 303 in Silverdale at a cost of $26 million, paid for by a 2003 gas tax. The new interchange, opened in November 2007, split the western terminus of SR 303 between two exits, signed as 45A and 45B,[2] and removed a loop ramp that created turning conflicts.[21][50] WSDOT began study of a Belfair bypass in 1966 and completed a provisional report in 2010 that did not recommend constructing a bypass of the community,[51] instead opting for a project to widen the highway and add safety improvements that began work in fall 2013.[52]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[2] km Exit Destinations Notes
Mason 0.00–
0.11
0.00–
0.18
US 101 – Port Angeles, Olympia Southern terminus, interchange
Allyn-Grapeview 23.23 37.39 SR 302 east – Tacoma Western terminus of SR 302
24.88 40.04 SR 106 west – Union Eastern terminus of SR 106
Belfair 26.35 42.41 SR 300 west – Belfair State Park Eastern terminus of SR 300
Kitsap Gorst 34.15–
34.23
54.96–
55.09

SR 16 Spur to SR 16 east – Port Orchard, Tacoma
Western terminus of SR 16 Spur
34.64 55.75 SR 16 east – Port Orchard, Tacoma, Business District Western terminus of SR 16
South end of freeway
Navy Yard City 36.04–
36.23
58.00–
58.31
36 SR 304 east – Bremerton Western terminus of SR 304, no southbound exit
Bremerton 36.98–
37.81
59.51–
60.85
Auto Center Way, Loxie Eagans Boulevard
37.99–
38.70
61.14–
62.28
SR 310 east (Kitsap Way) Western terminus of SR 310
38.91–
39.70
62.62–
63.89
Austin Drive – Kitsap Lake
Erlands Point-Kitsap Lake 40.68–
41.66
65.47–
67.05
Chico Way – Chico
Silverdale 42.88–
43.96
69.01–
70.75
Newberry Hill Road
45.10–
45.16
72.58–
72.68
45A SR 303 (Kitsap Mall Boulevard) – Kitsap Mall, Silverdale Northbound exit and southbound entrance
45.54–
46.19
73.29–
74.34
45B SR 303 south (Waaga Way) – East Bremerton
46.37–
47.28
74.63–
76.09
Trigger Avenue
Bangor 47.82–
48.96
76.96–
78.79
SR 308 east (Luoto Road) – Keyport, Naval Base Kitsap
Poulsbo 51.77–
51.87
83.32–
83.48
Finn Hill Road
52.36–
53.23
84.27–
85.67
SR 305 south – Poulsbo, Bainbridge Island
North end of freeway
59.81 96.25 SR 104 (Hood Canal Bridge) – Port Gamble, Kingston, Port Townsend, Port Angeles Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "47.17.010: State route No. 3". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. 1970. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d Strategic Planning Division (March 5, 2012). State Highway Log Planning Report 2011, SR 2 to SR 971 (PDF) (Report). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 187–202. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  3. ^ "SR 101: Junction SR 3/W Golden Pheasant Road" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. April 25, 2012. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Shelton". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. December 31, 1992. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b 2011 Washington State Rail System (PDF) (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 2012. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Goldsborough Creek". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Oakland Bay". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Allyn-Grapeview Census Designated Place (historical)". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. March 11, 2008. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: North Mason High School". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. March 1, 1993. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Belfair". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  11. ^ "SR 3: Junction SR 300" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. November 22, 2005. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b Google (March 5, 2013). "State Route 3" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Gorst". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  14. ^ "SR 3: Junction SR 16/SR 16 Spur Gorst" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 28, 2011. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Sinclair Inlet". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Navy Yard City". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  17. ^ "SR 3: Junction SR 304" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. November 3, 2008. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  18. ^ "SR 3: Junction SR 310/Kitsap Way" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. September 28, 2001. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Dyes Inlet". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Silverdale". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  21. ^ a b "SR 3: Junction SR 303/Kitsap Mall Boulevard" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. June 1, 2010. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Naval Submarine Base Bangor". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. November 17, 2008. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  23. ^ "SR 3: Junction SR 308/Luoto Road" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. February 26, 2009. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  24. ^ "SR 3: Junction SR 305" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. May 2, 2011. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  25. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Poulsbo". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  26. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Good Canal Bridge". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. August 1, 1990. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  27. ^ Staff (2011). "2011 Annual Traffic Report" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 64–66. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  28. ^ National Highway System: Washington (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. October 1, 2012. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  29. ^ "What is the National Highway System?". Federal Highway Administration. September 26, 2012. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  30. ^ "Transportation Commission List of Highways of Statewide Significance" (PDF). Washington State Transportation Commission. July 26, 2009. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  31. ^ Lorenzo, Judy. "Highways of Statewide Significance". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  32. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 19, 1915). "Chapter 164: Classification of Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1915 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 491. Retrieved March 5, 2013. A secondary state highway is established as follows: State road No. 21: This road shall begin at Kingston, thence by the most feasible route through Port Gamble, Poulsbo and Bremerton to a connection with the Olympic Highway between Shelton and Hoodsport in Mason county. 
  33. ^ State of Washington Showing State Highways Authorized by Legislative Acts of 1915 (DJVU) (Map). Bureau of Statistics and Immigration of the State of Washington. 1915. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  34. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 14, 1919). "Chapter 110: Amending Highway Classification Act". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1919 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 269–270. Retrieved March 5, 2013. That that certain highway being a section of State Road No 21 from the vicinity of the head of Port Orchard Bay southwesterly by the most feasible route to a connection with the Olympic Highway between Shelton and Hoodsport be known as the Navy Yard Highway. 
  35. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 19, 1923). "Chapter 185: Primary and Secondary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1923 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 631. Retrieved March 5, 2013. A primary state highway, to be known as State Road No. 14 or the Navy Yard Highway, is established as follows: Beginning at a junction with State Road No. 9, at the most feasible point between Shelton and Potlatch in Mason County; thence by the most feasible route through Union City and Clifton to Charleston in Kitsap County; also from a junction near Tidewater Creek in Kitsap County through Port Orchard, to Gig Harbor in Pierce County; also from a junction near Port Orchard by the most feasible route to the ferry landing at Harper. 
  36. ^ "Dedicate Navy Yard Highway". Spokane Daily Chronicle. June 13, 1923. p. 10. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  37. ^ Highway Map: State of Washington (DJVU) (Map). Department of Highways. January 1931. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  38. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 17–18, 1937). "Chapter 190: Establishment of Primary State Highways, Chapter 270: Classification of Public Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 940–942, 1010. Retrieved March 5, 2013. A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 14, or the Navy Yard Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 9, in the vicinity north of Shelton, thence in a northeasterly direction by the most feasible route by way of Port Orchard, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route to Gig Harbor; also beginning in the vicinity of Port Orchard on Primary State Highway No. 14, as herein described, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to the ferry landing at Harper. A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 21, or the Kitsap Peninsula Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at Kingston, thence westerly and northerly by the most feasible route by way of Port Gamble, thence southerly by the most feasible route by way of Poulsbo and Bremerton to a junction with Primary State Highway No. 14, west of Port Orchard; also beginning at Keyport, thence in a westerly direction by the most feasible route to a junction with Primary State Highway No. 21, as herein described. Secondary State Highway No. 14A; beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 14 in the vicinity southwest of Belfair, thence in a southwesterly direction by the most feasible route to Shelton on Primary State Highway No. 9. 
  39. ^ Highways of the State of Washington (DJVU) (Map). Department of Highways. 1939. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  40. ^ Washington State Legislature (1955). "Chapter 383". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1955 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. 
  41. ^ Seattle, 1958 (JPG) (Map). 1:250,000. United States Geological Survey. 1958. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  42. ^ Prahl, C. G. (December 1, 1965). "Identification of State Highways" (PDF). Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  43. ^ Seattle, 1965 (JPG) (Map). 1:250,000. United States Geological Survey. 1965. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  44. ^ "Owners Told Look Locally". Tri-City Herald. August 21, 1963. p. 5. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  45. ^ "Bremerton Freeway Opening First Section". Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways. February 8, 1968. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  46. ^ "Bremerton loses gas". Tri-City Herald. September 7, 1973. p. 85. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  47. ^ Ferguson, Adele (August 7, 1974). "Report from Olympia: The skunks are getting it the hard way". Daily Record. p. 6. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  48. ^ "Freeway planned for Trident base". The Spokesman-Review. September 22, 1977. p. 5. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  49. ^ Friedrich, Ed (December 29, 2012). "35 years ago, Trident subs changed face of Kitsap". Kitsap Sun. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  50. ^ Cook, Jeff (November 2007). "SR 3 - SR 303 Interchange (Waaga Way) - Complete November 2007". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  51. ^ Dayton, Kevin (June 23, 2010). "Belfair Bypass Provisio Report" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 2, 7. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  52. ^ Fuchs, Steve. "SR 3 - Belfair Area - Widening and Safety Improvements". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google

KML is from Wikidata