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Washington State Route 432

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State Route 432 marker

State Route 432
SR 432 is highlighted in red.
Route information
Auxiliary route of SR 4
Defined by RCW 47.17.625
Maintained by WSDOT
Length: 10.32 mi[2] (16.61 km)
Existed: 1964[1] – present
Major junctions
West end: SR 4 in West Longview
  SR 433 in Longview
SR 411 in Longview
East end: I‑5 in Kelso
Location
Counties: Cowlitz
Highway system
SR 411 SR 433

State Route 432 (SR 432) is a 10.32-mile-long (16.61 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Washington, serving the cities of Longview and Kelso in Cowlitz County. The highway travels east along the Columbia River from an intersection with SR 4 in West Longview through the Port of Longview and the termini of SR 433 and SR 411 in Longview. SR 432 crosses the Cowlitz River on a divided highway and ends at an interchange with Interstate 5 (I-5) in Kelso. SR 432 was established during the 1964 highway renumbering as SR 832, replacing a branch of Primary State Highway 12 (PSH 12) that had been routed through Longview and Kelso since 1937. SR 432 was established in 1968 and originally routed on Nichols Boulevard within Longview and was re-aligned onto its current route in 1991 after the opening of Industrial Way.

Route description[edit]

I-5 northbound at the Longview Wye in Kelso, the eastern terminus of SR 432
Longview Wye Interchange

SR 432 begins at an intersection with the Ocean Beach Highway, signed as SR 4, in West Longview in Cowlitz County.[3] The two-lane highway travels southeast as Willow Grove Connection Road and Industrial Way around Mount Solo and into the city of Longview.[4][5] The four-lane SR 432 parallel to a Columbia and Cowlitz Railway line and the Columbia River through the Port of Longview and intersects the northern terminus of SR 433, which travels on Oregon Way and the Lewis and Clark Bridge to Rainier, Oregon.[6][7] The highway turns northeast onto 3rd Avenue and crosses a BNSF rail line before it intersects the Tennant Way divided highway and the southern terminus of SR 411 in a partial cloverleaf interchange.[8] The SR 432 designation travels onto four-lane Tennant Way grade-separated highway and continues southeast, parallel to a BNSF rail yard, before intersecting Dike Road in a partial cloverleaf interchange and crossing over the Cowlitz River into Kelso.[9][10][11] The highway travels south of Southwest Washington Regional Airport and intersects Talley Way in a partial cloverleaf interchange before intersecting I-5.[12][13] The partial cloverleaf interchange, nicknamed the Longview Wye,[14] serves as the eastern terminus of SR 432 while the roadway continues south as the Old Pacific Highway.[15][16][17]

Every year, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) conducts a series of surveys on its highways in the state to measure traffic volume. This is expressed in terms of average annual daily traffic (AADT), which is a measure of traffic volume for any average day of the year. In 2011, WSDOT calculated that the busiest section of SR 432 is the bridge over the Cowlitz River, serving 30,000 vehicles, while the least busy section is the western terminus at SR 4 in West Longview, serving 3,500 vehicles.[18] The entire route of SR 432 is designated as an Intermodal Connector within the National Highway System,[19] a highway system that includes roadways important to the national economy, defense, and mobility;[20] and as a Highway of Statewide Significance by WSDOT,[21] which includes highways that connect major communities in the state of Washington.[22] SR 432 forms part of the Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic, serving as the link between Longview and the Lewis and Clark Bridge via 3rd Avenue on the 202-mile-long (325 km) bicycle race held annually.[23][24]

History[edit]

Shields of former PSH 12 and WA 832

SR 432 has been part of the Washington state highway system since 1937, when it was designated as a branch of PSH 12.[25] The LongviewKelso branch of PSH 12 traveled 5.47 miles (8.80 km) east from an intersection with the Ocean Beach Highway, signed as PSH 12 and U.S. Route 830 (US 830), onto Nichols Boulevard around Lake Sacajawea and Tennant Way in Longview and crossed the Cowlitz River to Kelso, where the highway ended at an intersection with the Pacific Highway, signed as PSH 1 and US 99.[26][27][28] The Longview–Kelso branch of PSH 12 was replaced by SR 832 during the 1964 highway renumbering and existed until US 830 was decommissioned in 1967,[29] as SR 432 was established as an auxiliary route of SR 4 before the highway system was codified in 1970.[1][30][31] SR 432 was re-aligned onto its present route, Industrial Way,[32] in 1991 to end at SR 4 in West Longview and to serve the Port of Longview.[1][33][34] The eastern terminus of SR 432, an interchange with I-5 nicknamed the Longview Wye,[14] was reconstructed by WSDOT beginning in December 2009.[35][36] WSDOT removed the northwest loop ramp, which connected Old Pacific Highway to southbound I-5,[37] and replaced it with an improved interchange with Talley Way that opened on October 28, 2011.[13][17][38]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire highway is in Cowlitz County.

Location mi[2] km Destinations Notes
West Longview 0.00 0.00 SR 4 (Ocean Beach Highway) – Cathlamet, Long Beach, Longview Western terminus
Longview 6.10 9.82 SR 433 south (Oregon Way) to US 30 – Port of Longview, Oregon Northern terminus of SR 433
7.47–
8.16
12.02–
13.13
SR 411 north (3rd Avenue) – Kelso Southern terminus of SR 411, interchange
West end of freeway
9.08–
9.65
14.61–
15.53
Dike Road
Kelso 9.75–
9.88
15.69–
15.90
Talley Way – Kelso Industrial Area
9.92–
10.32
15.96–
16.61
I‑5 – Seattle, Portland Eastern terminus, interchange, continues as Old Pacific Highway
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "47.17.625: State route No. 432", Revised Code of Washington, Washington State Legislature, 1991 [1970], retrieved February 17, 2013 
  2. ^ a b Staff (2012), State Highway Log: Planning Report 2012, SR 2 to SR 971 (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, pp. 1471–1475, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  3. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: West Longview", Geographic Names Information System, United States Geological Survey, May 15, 2000, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  4. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Mount Solo", Geographic Names Information System, United States Geological Survey, September 10, 1979, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  5. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Longview", Geographic Names Information System, United States Geological Survey, September 10, 1979, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  6. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Port of Longview", Geographic Names Information System, United States Geological Survey, September 10, 1979, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  7. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Lewis and Clark Bridge", Geographic Names Information System, United States Geological Survey, May 22, 1986, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  8. ^ SR 432: Junction SR 411/3rd Avenue (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, February 16, 2007, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  9. ^ SR 432: Junction Dike Road/Pioneer Bridge (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, October 15, 2001, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  10. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Cowlitz River", Geographic Names Information System, United States Geological Survey, September 10, 1979, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  11. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Kelso", Geographic Names Information System, United States Geological Survey, September 10, 1979, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  12. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Kelso-Longview Airport", Geographic Names Information System, United States Geological Survey, March 1, 1990, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  13. ^ a b SR 432: Junction Talley Way (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, May 10, 2012, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  14. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation (August 23, 2011), Road work to close portion of Longview Wye, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  15. ^ Google (February 17, 2013). "State Route 432" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  16. ^ 2011 Washington State Rail System (PDF) (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 2012. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  17. ^ a b SR 5 - Exit 36: Junction SR 432/Kelso/Longview (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, May 10, 2012, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  18. ^ Staff (2011), 2011 Annual Traffic Report (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, p. 182, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  19. ^ National Highway System: Longview, WA--OR (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. October 1, 2012. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  20. ^ What is the National Highway System?, Federal Highway Administration, September 26, 2012, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  21. ^ Transportation Commission List of Highways of Statewide Significance (PDF), Washington State Transportation Commission, July 26, 2009, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  22. ^ Lorenzo, Judy, Highways of Statewide Significance, Washington State Department of Transportation, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  23. ^ Group Health Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic (PDF) (Map). Cascade Bicycle Club. 2010. p. 17. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  24. ^ Finman, Alice (July 10, 2012), Annual event brings 10,000 bike riders to Western Washington roadways, Washington State Department of Transportation, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  25. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 17, 1937), "Chapter 185: Establishment of Primary State Highways", Session Laws of the State of Washington, Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.), Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature, pp. 939–940, retrieved February 17, 2013, SEC. 12. A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 12, or the Ocean Beach Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Also beginning at Longview on Primary State Highway No. 12, as herein described, thence in a southeasterly direction by the most feasible route to a junction with Primary State Highway No. 1, south of Kelso. 
  26. ^ Staff (1960), Annual Traffic Report, 1960 (PDF), Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways, p. 126, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  27. ^ Hoquiam, 1951 (JPG) (Map). 1:250,000. United States Geological Survey. 1951. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  28. ^ Hoquiam, 1958 (JPG) (Map). 1:250,000. United States Geological Survey. 1958. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  29. ^ Prahl, C. G. (December 1, 1965), Identification of State Highways (PDF), Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  30. ^ Hoquiam, 1968 (JPG) (Map). 1:250,000. United States Geological Survey. 1968. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  31. ^ Washington Oregon Road Map (Map). 1 in ≈ 17.3 mi. Cartography by Rand McNally. Union 76. 1972. § H5. 
  32. ^ Washington State Highways, 2011–2012 (PDF) (Map). 1:842,000. Washington State Department of Transportation. 2011. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  33. ^ Washington State Legislature (May 21, 1991), "Chapter 342: Engrossed Senate Bill 5801 - State Highway Routes -- Revisions To", Session Laws of the State of Washington, Session Laws of the State of Washington (1991 ed.), Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  34. ^ Staff (1992), 1992 Annual Traffic Report (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, p. 147, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  35. ^ Tak, Denys (October 2011), I-5 - SR 432 Talley Way Interchange - Open October 2011, Washington State Department of Transportation, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  36. ^ Longview Wye ground-breaking ceremony set for Friday, Longview, Washington: The Daily News, December 15, 2009, retrieved February 17, 2013 
  37. ^ I-5 - SR 432 Talley Way Interchange - Closures Map (Map). Cartography by TeleNav. Washington State Department of Transportation. 2006. Retrieved February 17, 2013. 
  38. ^ Sause, Heidi (October 28, 2011), Reconstructed Longview Wye opens to drivers six months ahead of schedule, Washington State Department of Transportation, retrieved February 17, 2013 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google

KML is from Wikidata