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Washington State Route 9

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State Route 9 marker

State Route 9
SR 9 highlighted in red
Route information
Defined by RCW 47.17.040
Maintained by WSDOT
Length98.17 mi[2] (157.99 km)
Existed1964[1]–present
Major junctions
South end SR 522 near Woodinville
 
North end Hwy 11 at Canada–US border in Sumas
Location
CountiesSnohomish, Skagit, Whatcom
Highway system
SR 8SR 10

State Route 9 (SR 9) is a 98.17-mile (157.99 km) long state highway traversing three counties, Snohomish, Skagit and Whatcom, in the U.S. state of Washington. The highway extends north from an interchange with SR 522 in the vicinity of Woodinville north through Snohomish, Lake Stevens, Arlington, Sedro-Woolley and Nooksack to become British Columbia Highway 11 (BC 11) at the Canada–US border in Sumas. Three other roadways are briefly concurrent with the route: SR 530 in Arlington, SR 20 in Sedro-Woolley and SR 542 near Deming. A spur route in Sumas serves trucks traveling into British Columbia.

Before SR 9 was created, several other roads used the route of the current highway. The first was a roadway extending from the current southern terminus to Snohomish established by 1895 and another road between Arlington and Sedro-Woolley by 1911. The current SR 542 concurrency was first established in 1925, when a branch of State Road 1 from Bellingham to Mount Baker was added to the state highway system. These roads were combined and several other roads were added to create Secondary State Highway 1A (SSH 1A), which originally ran from Woodinville to Blaine in 1937. A branch of SSH 1A connected the mainline to the Canada–US border in Sumas, but was later included into SSH 1A when the Blaine to Sumas segment was deleted in 1953. A highway renumbering in 1964 introduced the sign routes that would be co-signed with the existing system until 1970, one of which would replace SSH 1A, SR 9. SSH 1A / SR 9 extended south to Woodinville until 1965, when it was shortened to SR 202, later SR 522, which wasn't complete yet. SR 9 was not complete between Lake Stevens and Arlington until after 1966.

Between 2004 and 2009, nine complete construction projects, arranged by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), have improved the roadway. The projects ranged from expanding the current weigh station at the Soper Hill Road intersection in 2005 to realigning the highway between Nooksack and Sumas in 2006 to eliminate 90-degree turns. WSDOT is also widening SR 9 in Snohomish County from 2 lanes to a four-lane divided highway. Between 2009 and 2013, WSDOT plans to complete six other projects in Snohomish County to improve the corridor from SR 522 to Bryant. Some projects include widenings, adding a roundabout at SR 531, realignments south of Snohomish and the addition of web cameras.

Route description[edit]

SR 9 begins less than one mile (1.6 km) north of the KingSnohomish county line near Woodinville at a partial cloverleaf interchange with SR 522. The roadway continues south as Woodinville–Snohomish Road, while SR 522 connects the area to Seattle, Bothell, and Monroe. SR 9 travels north along the west side of the Brightwater sewage treatment plant and a community park in Maltby.[3] The four-lane highway continues north and intersects SR 524 at Turners Corner before turning northeast towards Clearview and Cathcart. SR 9 travels along the eastern ridge that overlooks the Snohomish River valley and has several sections with median barriers to form a divided highway.[4]

Shortly after passing Cathcart, SR 96 terminates at the road. SR 9 passes Harvey Airfield and crosses another BNSF rail line and the Snohomish River to enter Snohomish. North of the Snohomish River Bridge, the highway encounters a diamond interchange with 2nd Street and Riverview Road and turns northeast to intersect Bickford Avenue, which once was U.S. Route 2 (US 2).[2][5] Curving north out of Snohomish, the route interchanges with US 2 in a modified diamond interchange, with a westbound US 2 offramp routed onto New Bunk Foss Road.[6]

In suburban West Lake Stevens near the Lake Stevens shoreline, SR 204 ends at the highway.[7] After the intersection, the roadway had an estimated daily average of 25,000 motorists in 2007, making this stretch of road the busiest on the whole highway.[8] SR 9 also forms the western boundary of Lake Stevens and the eastern boundary of Marysville while passing a weigh station and the SR 92 junction. After Lake Cassidy, the road intersects SR 528 and continues into North Marysville, where the roadway passes over the Snohomish County Centennial Trail.[9] After intersecting SR 531 at a roundabout, and several residential subdivisions near the Arlington High School, the highway enters downtown Arlington as Hazel Street. After a brief concurrency with SR 530, SR 9 crosses the Stillaguamish River and passes Bryant to enter a heavily forested area and leave Snohomish County.[4][10]

The Lake McMurray Store, established in 1889, located on SR 9 in Lake McMurray, a community located in southern Skagit County.

Entering Skagit County, the highway continues northwest through a large forest to Lake McMurray, where it intersects SR 534 and encounters the Lake McMurray Store, established in 1889.[11] The road passes through Big Lake and its community of the same name before intersecting SR 538 at a roundabout east of Mount Vernon. Turning northeast to Clear Lake, the route crosses the Skagit River into Sedro-Woolley. In Sedro-Woolley, the street becomes concurrent with SR 20 and is named Moore Street. At the end of the concurrency, the road turns north as Township Street, paralleling another BNSF rail line,[12] at Cascade Middle School. Continuing north out of the city and into rural areas, SR 9 crosses the Samish River and exits Skagit County.[4][10][13]

The highway enters Whatcom County in a valley located east of Lake Whatcom. Passing Acme and crossing the Nooksack River, the roadway becomes concurrent with SR 542 at a roundabout in Deming. Traveling west with SR 542 along the Nooksack River, the road splits at another roundabout in Cedarville and continues north through a series of 90-degree turns in a plain located near the Sumas River. In Nooksack, the route becomes Nooksack Avenue and encounters SR 544, named Main Street, which travels west to Everson. North of Nooksack, SR 9 intersects SR 546 in a rural area and travels northeast along the Sumas River to Sumas. In Sumas, SR 547 ends at SR 9 and a spur route that serves trucks branches off and SR 9 terminates at the Canada–US border. The road continues north from the Canada–US border, through Abbotsford, BC to Highway 1 (BC 1), as BC 11.[4][10][14]

Spur route[edit]


State Route 9 Spur
LocationSumas
Length0.24 mi (0.39 km)

Within Sumas, SR 9 has a short 0.24 mi (0.39 km) spur route that is used by trucks travelling into Canada.[2] SR 9 Spur starts at SR 9 (Cherry Street) and travels east as Garfield Street and north as Sumas Avenue to the Canada–US border, where it becomes Boundary Avenue and reconnects back to SR 9's continuation in Canada, Highway 11 (BC 11) in Abbotsford, BC.[2][14][15] After the Cherry Street intersection, an estimated daily average of 1,800 motorists used the roadway in 2007.[8]

History[edit]

The current route of SR 9 began as a road extending from Grace (today Woodinville) north to Snohomish, first appearing in an 1895 map.[16] The Snohomish to Arlington segment was not built until after SR 9, but between Arlington and Sedro-Woolley, there was a highway by 1911.[17] The first section of the roadway to be included in the state highway system was the current SR 542 concurrency, which became a branch of State Road 1 extending from Bellingham to Mount Baker in 1925.[18] Secondary State Highway 1A (SSH 1A) was established in 1937 and ran from Primary State Highway 2 (PSH 2) in Woodinville north to Sumas and west to PSH 1 in Blaine. A branch of SSH 1A connected the main highway to the Canada–US border.[19] Between Lynden and Nooksack, SSH 1A was realigned in 1951 and in 1953, SSH 1A between Blaine and Sumas was deleted.[20][21] SSH 1E became concurrent with SSH 1A in 1957 when it was extended east through Arlington to Darrington.[22] A third concurrency was added in 1961 when PSH 16 was extended west, concurrent in Sedro-Woolley, to Fredonia.[23] During the 1964 highway renumbering, a new system of highways, sign routes, was introduced and was co-signed with the existing primary and secondary state highways. SSH 1A became SR 9, but SSH 1A was still signed until 1970.[1][24] In 1965, SSH 1A / SR 9 was shortened from Woodinville to SR 202 in Grace, which was not complete yet.[25][26] By 1966, the highway was not complete between Lake Stevens and Arlington and in 1970, SR 202 became SR 522.[27]

Since 2004, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has completed nine construction projects on SR 9.[28] The Lake Stevens weigh station, located on the west side of the highway at the Sopher Hill Road intersection was expanded to serve two trucks at once in late 2005.[29] The U.S. Route 2 (US 2) interchange was modified to use New Bunk Foss Road as an onramp and traffic signals were added in January 2006.[30] The roadway was repaved between Snohomish and Lake Stevens and also guardrails and turn lanes were added in 2006.[31]< On November 22, 2006, WSDOT opened a new alignment of SR 9 between Nooksack to Sumas that bypassed three 90-degree turns.[32][33] A roundabout was added to the SR 538 intersection east of Mount Vernon in summer 2007.[34][35] Between SR 522 and SR 524, the highway was widened from a 2-lane road to a four-lane divided highway in 2008.[36][37] A curve on the roadway north of Arlington was straightened in late 2008 and turn lanes were added to two intersections near Bryant.[38][39]

Future developments[edit]

Between 1980 and 2000, the population of Snohomish County grew by 80 percent, resulting in increased congestion on the two-lane SR 9. Accidents have increased from an average of 325 collisions per year in the 1990s to 450 collisions per year between 2000 and 2007. Since late 2005, WSDOT has been improving the corridor with six projects located between SR 522 and the Skagit County line that are scheduled to be completed by 2013.[40][41] South of Snohomish, WSDOT is improving the highway in multiple ways including new intersections and alignments, new web cameras and new turn lanes.[42][43] Between SR 524 and Clearview, the 2-lane road is being widened to a four-lane divided highway starting in 2011.[44][45] The SR 531 intersection south of Arlington was scheduled to be rebuilt as a roundabout in 2011.[46][47][48] The roundabout option was chosen over a traffic signal in early October 2009.[49] A route development plan is currently being designed for the highway between SR 522 and Schloman Road north of Arlington.[50][51] During a project to widen SR 9 in Lake Stevens, a left-turn lane to Lake Stevens Road was removed and residents located on the road have protested.[52]

Major intersections[edit]

CountyLocationmi[2]kmDestinationsNotes
Snohomish0.000.00 SR 522 – Seattle, MonroeSouthern terminus; interchange
1.572.53 SR 524 (Maltby Road)
6.9711.22 SR 96 west (Lowell Larimer Road) – Mill Creek
Snohomish9.5815.42Second StreetInterchange
10.8717.49Bickford Avenue / Avenue DFormer US 2
12.2319.68 US 2 (Stevens Pass Highway) – Everett, Monroe, WenatcheeInterchange
Lake Stevens15.7625.36 SR 204 west – Everett
17.4928.15 SR 92 east – Granite Falls
Marysville19.2631.00 SR 528 west (64th Street Northeast) – Marysville
26.0541.92 SR 531 west (172nd Street Northeast) – Smokey PointRoundabout
Arlington29.4647.41 SR 530 west to I-5 / Division StreetSouthern end of SR 530 concurrency
29.5747.59 SR 530 east (Burke Avenue) – DarringtonNorthern end of SR 530 concurrency
SkagitLake McMurray40.0364.42 SR 534 west to I-5
49.7880.11 SR 538 west (College Way) to I-5 – Mount VernonRoundabout
Sedro-Woolley55.8989.95 SR 20 west (North Cascades Highway) – BurlingtonSouthern end of SR 20 concurrency
57.1792.01 SR 20 east (North Cascades Highway) – ConcreteNorthern end of SR 20 concurrency
WhatcomDeming79.41127.80 SR 542 east (Mount Baker Highway) – Glacier, Mt. BakerRoundabout; southern end of SR 542 concurrency
84.01135.20 SR 542 west – BellinghamRoundabout; northern end of SR 542 concurrency
Nooksack90.36145.42 SR 544 west – Everson
93.61150.65 SR 546 west (East Badger Road) – Lynden
Sumas97.50156.91 SR 547 south – Mt. Baker
98.00157.72
SR 9 Spur north (Garfield Street) – Truck Crossing
98.17157.99 Hwy 11 north – Abbotsford, Mission, Maple RidgeNorthern terminus at Canada–United States border
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Spur intersections[edit]

The entire spur is in Sumas, Whatcom County.

mi[2]kmDestinationsNotes
0.000.00 SR 9 (Cherry Street) – Nooksack, Sedro-Woolley, ArlingtonSouthern terminus
0.240.39Boundary StreetNorthern terminus at Canada–United States border
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Washington State Legislature (1970). "RCW 47.17.040: State route No. 9". Retrieved August 3, 2009.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Washington State Department of Transportation (2008). "State Highway Log: Planning Report, SR 2 to SR 971" (PDF). Retrieved August 3, 2009.
  3. ^ Haglund, Noah (December 22, 2015). "Snohomish County buys former horse farm in Maltby for future park". The Everett Herald. Retrieved March 8, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d Google (March 8, 2019). "State Route 9" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved March 8, 2019.
  5. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (September 17, 2004). "SR 9; Junction 2nd Street / Riverview Road" (PDF). Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  6. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (April 24, 2009). "SR 2; Junction SR 9" (PDF). Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  7. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (July 1, 2009). "SR 9; Junction SR 204" (PDF). Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  8. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation (2007). "2007 Annual Traffic Report" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 26, 2009. Retrieved August 5, 2009.
  9. ^ Snohomish County Centennial Trail (PDF) (Map). Snohomish County. 2009. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  10. ^ a b c Washington State Highways, 2008–2009 (PDF) (Map) (2008–09 ed.). 1:842,000. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. Washington State Department of Transportation. 2008. § A3, B3, C3, D3. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  11. ^ Cohen, Aubery (August 6, 2008). "Highway 9: Enjoy the pace of memory lane". The Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  12. ^ Washington State Rail System (PDF) (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. 2008. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  13. ^ Skagit County: Mount Vernon, Anacortes (Map) (2004 ed.). City Street Map. G.M. Johnson. 2004. ISBN 1-894570-90-1. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  14. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation (August 30, 2004). "SR 9; Junction SR 9 SP Sumas" (PDF). Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  15. ^ Google (August 4, 2009). "State Route 9 Spur" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  16. ^ Snohomish, 1895 (Map). 1:125,000. Washington 1:125,000 topographic quadrangles. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. Washington State University. 1895. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  17. ^ Mount Vernon, 1911 (Map). 1:125,000. Washington 1:125,000 topographic quadrangles. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. Washington State University. 1911. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  18. ^ Washington State Legislature (February 18, 2009). "Chapter 26". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1925 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 60. Retrieved August 4, 2009. Section 1. A primary state highway, to be known as State Road No. 1 or the Pacific Highway, is established as follows: Beginning at the international boundary line at Blaine in the County of Whatcom; thence by the most feasible route in a southerly direction through the cities of Bellingham, Mt. Vernon, Everett, Seattle, Tacoma, Olympia, Chehalis, Kelso and Vancouver to the interstate bridge over the Columbia River between Vancouver and Portland; also from a junction in the city of Bellingham; thence by the most feasible route in an easterly direction to Austin Pass in Whatcom County.
  19. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 18, 1937). "Chapter 207: Classification of Public Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 994. Retrieved August 4, 2009. (a) Secondary State Highway No. 1A; beginning at Blaine on Primary State Highway No. 1, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to a point east of Van Buren, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route to an intersection with Primary State Highway No. 1 in the vicinity west of Deming, thence following the route of Primary State Highway No. 1 to a point east of Deming, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route by way of Sedro Woolley, Arlington and Snohomish to an intersection with Primary State Highway No. 2 in the vicinity southeast of Bothell; also beginning at a junction with Secondary State Highway No. 1A in the vicinity east of Van Buren, thence in a northerly direction by the most feasible route to the international boundary in the vicinity west of Sumas.
  20. ^ Washington State Legislature (1951). "Chapter 273". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1951 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature.
  21. ^ Washington State Legislature (1953). "Chapter 280". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1953 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  22. ^ Washington State Legislature (1957). "Chapter 172". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1957 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  23. ^ Washington State Legislature (April 3, 1961). "Chapter 21: Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1961 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 2618. Retrieved August 4, 2009. SEC. 3. Section 47.16.160, chapter 13, Laws of 1961 and RCW 47.16.160 are each amended to read as follows: A primary state highway to be known as primary state highway No. 16, or the North Cross State highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning in the vicinity of Pateros on primary state highway No. 10, thence in a northerly and westerly direction by the most feasible route by way of Twisp, Diablo dam, Marblemount, Concrete, Sedro Woolley and Burlington to a junction with primary state highway No. 1 east of Whitney; also beginning at a point in the vicinity south of Twisp on primary state highway No. 16, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to a junction with primary state highway No. 10 in the vicinity south of Okanogan; also, beginning at a wye connection with primary state highway No. 16, southwest of Okanogan, thence southwesterly to a junction with primary state highway No. 10 in the vicinity of Malott; Provided, That until such times as primary state highway No. 16 from southwest of Okanogan to the vicinity of Malott is actually constructed on the location adopted by the highway commission, no existing county roads shall be maintained or improved by the highway commission as a temporary route of said primary state highway No. 16.
  24. ^ C. G. Prahl (December 1, 1965). "Identification of State Highways" (PDF). Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  25. ^ Washington State Legislature (1965). "Chapter 170". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1965 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature.
  26. ^ Seattle, 1965 (Map). 1:250,000. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. University of Texas at Austin. 1965. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  27. ^ Victoria, 1966 (Map). 1:250,000. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. University of Texas at Austin. 1966. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  28. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "Agency Projects: Completed Projects". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  29. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2005). "SR 9 – Lake Stevens Weigh Station – Complete November 2005". Archived from the original on June 29, 2010. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  30. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2006). "SR 9 – US 2 Interchange Modifications – Complete January 2006". Archived from the original on June 29, 2010. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  31. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2006). "SR 9 – 56th Street SE to 60th Street NE Paving and Safety – Complete June 2006". Archived from the original on June 29, 2010. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  32. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2006). "SR 9 – Nooksack Road Vicinity to Cherry Street – Complete November 2006". Archived from the original on December 13, 2006. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  33. ^ SR 9 – Nooksack Road to Cherry Street (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. 2006. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  34. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2007). "SR 9 – SR 538 Intersection Improvements – Complete August 2007". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  35. ^ SR 9 – SR 538 Intersection Improvements (Map). Cartography by Tele Atlas. Washington State Department of Transportation. 2005. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  36. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2008). "SR 9 – SR 522 to 212th Street NE – SR 524 – Stage 1B and 2 – Complete May 2008". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  37. ^ SR 9 – SR 522 to 212th (Maltby Road) (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. 2008. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  38. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2008). "SR 9 – Schloman Road to 268th Street NE – Complete November 2008". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  39. ^ SR 9 Schloman Road to 268th Street NE (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. 2008. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  40. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "State Route 9 Corridor Program". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  41. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "Agency Projects: Highway, Ferry and Rail Construction and Improvement Projects". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  42. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "SR 9 – 176th to Marsh Road". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  43. ^ SR 9 176th to Marsh Rd Map and Graphics (Map). Cartography by Tele Atlas. Washington State Department of Transportation. 2009. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  44. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "SR 9 – 212th Street SE to 176th SE – Widening (Stage 3)". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  45. ^ SR 9 – 212th SE to 176th SE Project Area (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. 2009. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  46. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "SR 9 – SR 531 / 172nd Street NE – Intersection Improvements". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  47. ^ SR 9 – SR 531 / 172nd Street NE – Intersection Improvements (Map). Cartography by Tele Atlas. Washington State Department of Transportation. 2009. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  48. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "SR 9 – SR 531 / 172nd Street NE – Intersection Improvements – Design Options". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  49. ^ "Roundabout selected as preferred option for SR 531 intersection in Arlington" (Press release). Washington State Department of Transportation. October 6, 2009. Retrieved November 10, 2009.
  50. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2009). "SR 9 – Route Development Plan – SR 522 to Schloman Road Vinicity". Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  51. ^ SR 9 Route Development Plan – SR 522 to Schloman Road Vinicity (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. 2009. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  52. ^ Sheets, Bill (November 14, 2009). "Lake Stevens neighbors protest loss of left turn off Highway 9". The Everett Herald. Retrieved November 16, 2009.

External links[edit]

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata