Washington Township, Morris County, New Jersey

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Washington Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Washington
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Morris County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Morris County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°47′05″N 74°47′52″W / 40.784634°N 74.797766°W / 40.784634; -74.797766Coordinates: 40°47′05″N 74°47′52″W / 40.784634°N 74.797766°W / 40.784634; -74.797766[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated April 2, 1798
Named for George Washington
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Body Township Committee
 • Mayor Kenneth W. "Bill" Roehrich (R, term ends December 31, 2017)[3][4]
 • Administrator Andrew Coppola[5]
 • Municipal clerk Nina DiGregorio[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 44.771 sq mi (115.957 km2)
 • Land 44.387 sq mi (114.963 km2)
 • Water 0.384 sq mi (0.994 km2)  0.86%
Area rank 42nd of 566 in state
2nd of 39 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 988 ft (301 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 18,533
 • Estimate (2016)[11] 18,695
 • Rank 138th of 566 in state
9th of 39 in county[12]
 • Density 417.5/sq mi (161.2/km2)
 • Density rank 457th of 566 in state
36th of 39 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07853 - Long Valley[13]
Area code(s) 908[14]
FIPS code 3402777240[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882198[1][17]
Website www.wtmorris.org

Washington Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 18,533,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 941 (+5.3%) from the 17,592 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,000 (+12.8%) from the 15,592 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

It is one of six municipalities (five of which are townships) in the state of New Jersey with the name "Washington Township".[19] Washington Borough, in fact is only 10 miles (16 km) away. To add to the confusion, Washington Borough is surrounded by another municipality that is also called Washington Township.

U.S. Route 46, County Route 513, and County Route 517 pass through town. It is only minutes away from Interstate 80 in neighboring Mount Olive and Interstate 78 in neighboring Tewksbury Township. U.S. Route 206 is also accessible in nearby Bedminster and Chester townships.

History[edit]

Washington Township was incorporated as a township by the New Jersey Legislature on April 2, 1798, from portions of Roxbury Township.[20] Portions of the township were taken to form Chester Township as of April 1, 1799.[21] The township was named for George Washington, one of more than ten communities statewide named for the first president.[22][23]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 44.771 square miles (115.957 km2), including 44.387 square miles (114.963 km2) of land and 0.384 square miles (0.994 km2) of water (0.86%).[1][2]

Long Valley (2010 population of 1,879[24]) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Washington Township.[25][26][27] The Long Valley section — the heart of the township — was called German Valley when it was first settled in the 18th century by people from Saxony, in Germany,[28] until its name was changed around 1917 in the wake of anti-German sentiment following World War I.[29]

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Bartley, Bettystown, Crestmoore, Drakestown, Fairmount, Four Bridges, German Valley, Lake George, Middle Valley, Naughright, Parker, Pleasant Grove, Pottersville, Scrappy Corner, Springtown and Stephensburg.[30]

Schooley's Mountain is an unincorporated community in Washington Township named for the Schooley family, who owned a considerable amount of land there during the 1790s. The natural springs in the area helped attract visitors to the Schooley's Mountain section in the 1800s.[31]

Neighboring municipalities include Morris County communities Chester Township to the east, Mount Olive to the north, Hunterdon County communities Tewksbury Township to the south and Lebanon Township to the southwest as well as Warren County communities Mansfield Township to the west and Hackettstown to the northwest. Also in Somerset County in the extreme southeast corner of the town there is a border with Bedminster Township.[32]

Demographics[edit]

The Zion Lutheran Church in Washington Township located near the intersection of Route 513 and Route 517.
Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,793
1820 1,876 4.6%
1830 2,188 16.6%
1840 2,451 12.0%
1850 2,502 2.1%
1860 2,504 0.1%
1870 2,484 −0.8%
1880 2,681 7.9%
1890 2,367 −11.7%
1900 2,220 −6.2%
1910 1,900 −14.4%
1920 1,779 −6.4%
1930 1,615 −9.2%
1940 1,870 15.8%
1950 2,147 14.8%
1960 3,330 55.1%
1970 6,962 109.1%
1980 11,402 63.8%
1990 15,592 36.7%
2000 17,592 12.8%
2010 18,533 5.3%
Est. 2016 18,695 [11][33] 0.9%
Population sources:
1810-1920[34] 1840[35] 1850-1870[36]
1850[37] 1870[38] 1880-1890[39]
1890-1910[40] 1910-1930[41]
1930-1990[42] 2000[43][44] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 18,533 people, 6,237 households, and 5,195 families residing in the township. The population density was 417.5 per square mile (161.2/km2). There were 6,488 housing units at an average density of 146.2 per square mile (56.4/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.06% (17,247) White, 1.39% (257) Black or African American, 0.06% (11) Native American, 3.30% (612) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 0.69% (127) from other races, and 1.49% (277) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.57% (847) of the population.[8]

There were 6,237 households out of which 43.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.7% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.7% were non-families. 13.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.95 and the average family size was 3.27.[8]

In the township, the population was spread out with 28.7% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 19.6% from 25 to 44, 34.5% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.0 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 93.3 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $112,651 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,207) and the median family income was $124,818 (+/- $8,669). Males had a median income of $92,019 (+/- $5,016) versus $66,302 (+/- $11,089) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $49,154 (+/- $2,492). About 0.1% of families and 0.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.2% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.[45]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 17,592 people, 5,755 households, and 4,874 families residing in the township. The population density was 392.1 people per square mile (151.4/km²). There were 5,890 housing units at an average density of 131.3 per square mile (50.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.16% White, 0.83% African American, 0.09% Native American, 1.87% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.35% from other races, and 0.65% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.21% of the population.[43][44]

There were 5,755 households, out of which 47.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 76.1% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 15.3% were non-families. 12.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.02 and the average family size was 3.31.[43][44]

In the township the population was spread out with 30.2% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 8.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.5 males.[43][44]

The median income for a household in the township was $97,763, and the median income for a family was $104,926. Males had a median income of $76,791 versus $41,759 for females. The per capita income for the township was $37,489. About 1.8% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 4.0% of those age 65 or over.[43][44]

Schooley's Mountain in Washington Township.

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Washington Township is governed under the Township form of government. The five-member Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][46] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Vice Mayor.

As of 2016, the members of the Washington Township Committee are Mayor Kenneth W. "Bill" Roehrich (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2018; term as mayor ends 2016), Vice Mayor Kenneth W. Short (R, term on committee ends 2018; term as deputy mayor ends 2016), Donald H. Babb (R, 2016), James LiaBraaten (R, 2016) and Matthew Murello (R, 2017).[3][47][48][49][50][51][52]

The 2013 property tax rate for Washington Township was $2.328 per $100 of assessed value, with an equalization ratio of 97.57%.[53]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Washington Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[54] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[55][56][57]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[58] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[59] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[60][61]

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton Town) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[62] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[63] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[64]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[65] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[66] As of 2016, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, term ends December 31, 2016),[67] Deputy Freeholder William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2017),[68] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[69] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[70] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (Montville, 2016)[71] Christine Myers (Mendham Township, 2018),[72] and Deborah Smith (Denville, 2018).[73][66][74] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[75] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[76] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2019).[66][77]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 12,709 registered voters in Washington Township, of which 1,999 (15.7%) were registered as Democrats, 5,295 (41.7%) were registered as Republicans and 5,401 (42.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 14 voters registered to other parties.[78]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 64.0% of the vote (6,021 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 34.9% (3,278 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (107 votes), among the 9,451 ballots cast by the township's 13,373 registered voters (45 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 70.7%.[79][80] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 61.1% of the vote (6,323 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 37.6% (3,887 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (94 votes), among the 10,342 ballots cast by the township's 13,315 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.7%.[81] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 64.7% of the vote (6,402 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 34.1% (3,377 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (79 votes), among the 9,894 ballots cast by the township's 13,048 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 75.8.[82]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 75.5% of the vote (4,467 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 22.5% (1,330 votes), and other candidates with 2.0% (120 votes), among the 5,981 ballots cast by the township's 13,294 registered voters (64 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 45.0%.[83][84] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 69.1% of the vote (5,076 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 21.5% (1,582 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.4% (618 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (39 votes), among the 7,348 ballots cast by the township's 13,037 registered voters, yielding a 56.4% turnout.[85]

Education[edit]

The Washington Township Schools is a public school district that serves students in kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its four schools had an enrollment of 3,589 students and 202.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 17.8:1.[86] Schools in the district (with 2014-15 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[87]) are Benedict A. Cucinella Elementary School[88] (521 students; in grades K-5), Flocktown-Kossmann School[89] (501; K-5), Old Farmers Road School[90] (358; K-5) and Long Valley Middle School[91] for grades 6-8 (892).[92][93]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend West Morris Central High School, which is located in the township, but has a Chester mailing address. The school is part of the West Morris Regional High School District, which also serves students from the surrounding Morris County school districts of Chester Borough, Chester Township, Mendham Borough, Mendham Township, who attend West Morris Mendham High School.[94] As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,299 students and 100.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.9:1.[95]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 149.44 miles (240.50 km) of roadways, of which 129.99 miles (209.20 km) were maintained by the municipality, 18.25 miles (29.37 km) by Morris County and 1.20 miles (1.93 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[96]

U.S. Route 46 passes through in the northwestern area.

The closest limited access roads are at least 20 minutes away in neighboring Tewksbury and Mount Olive: Interstates 78 and 80, respectively.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit offered local bus service on the MCM5 route, which was terminated in 2010 as part of budget cuts.[97][98][99]

Local media[edit]

Radio station WRNJ has studios, offices and its transmitter in Washington Township, broadcasting at 1510 AM. The station is licensed to nearby Hackettstown. The official newspaper of Washington Township is The Observer-Tribune.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Washington Township include:

References[edit]

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  29. ^ Karcher, Alan J. "MORRIS COUNTY'S MUNICIPAL MADNESS", Daily Record (Morristown), February 7, 1999. Accessed December 23, 2012. "However, the strong anti-German sentiment generated during World War I caused the name to be changed to Long Valley around 1917."
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  72. ^ Christine Myers, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  73. ^ Deborah Smith, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
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  86. ^ District information for Washington Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
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  88. ^ Benedict A. Cucinella Elementary School, Washington Township Schools. Accessed March 19, 2017.
  89. ^ Flocktown-Kossmann School, Washington Township Schools. Accessed March 19, 2017.
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  91. ^ Long Valley Middle School, Washington Township Schools. Accessed March 19, 2017.
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  99. ^ Private Carrier Bus Service reductions, NJ Transit. Accessed August 3, 2015.
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  105. ^ via Associated Press. "Celeste Holm, Oscar-winning actress, dies at 95", The Express-Times, July 15, 2012. Accessed October 22, 2015. "Celeste Holm married her fourth husband, actor Robert Wesley Addy, in 1966. The couple lived in Washington Township., Morris County, N.J."
  106. ^ Summary of Preserved Farms - EG Jewett / Holm Farm, Morris County Agriculture Development Board, October 12, 2012. Accessed October 22, 2015. "Owned since 1922 by the family of actress Celeste Holm, this large farm atop Schooley's Mountain is in wheat and tree fruit production."
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  110. ^ About Paul Schmidtberger, Marly Rusoff & Associates. Accessed October 22, 2015. "Paul Schmidtberger was born and raised in Schooley's Mountain, New Jersey."
  111. ^ Smith, Jessica. " TV news reporter recalls how her career took offOBHS grad became first helicopter reporter to win national Emmy", Suburban, July 3, 2008. Accessed October 22, 2015. "Though Sohn now lives in Dan's hometown of Long Valley with her family, her mother Alexsandra still lives in Old Bridge."
  112. ^ Franze, Anthony. "A Between The Lines Interview with Lisa Unger by Anthony J. Franze", The Big Thrill, January 1, 2014. Accessed May 18, 2016. "My teen years were spent in a small town in New Jersey called Long Valley. When I turned eighteen, I left for college in Manhattan and spent the next thirteen years in New York City. My brother swears that Long Valley was my inspiration for The Hollows."

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